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  • Have you experienced déjà vu?

    你有過既視感嗎?

  • It's that shadowy feeling you get when a situation seems familiar.

    這是一種當你處在一個似曾相似的情況下會有的模糊感覺。

  • A scene in a restaurant plays out exactly as you remember.

    腦袋浮出一幕,跟你記憶裡的餐廳相同。

  • The world moves like a ballet you've choreographed, but the sequence can't be based on a past experience because you've never eaten here before.

    整個世界像跳起了芭蕾舞,而你就是編舞者,但因為你從沒在這吃過飯,所以不能根據過去的經驗來跳。

  • This is the first time you've had clams.

    這是你第一次吃蛤蜊。

  • So, what's going on?

    究竟是怎麼回事?

  • Unfortunately, there isn't one single explanation for déjà vu.

    可惜目前既視感沒有單一的解釋。

  • The experience is brief and occurs without notice, making it nearly impossible for scientists to record and study it.

    這個感覺很短暫,且會在沒有預料下發生,讓科學家幾乎沒辦法紀錄和研究。

  • Scientists can't simply sit around and wait for it to happen to themthis could take years!

    總不能讓科學家整天坐在那等待既視感發生,有可能要花好幾年!

  • It has no physical manifestations, and in studies, it's described by the subject as a sensation or feeling.

    既視感沒有具體的證據,且在研究中,人們也總是把它歸類為一種感覺或知覺。

  • Because of this lack of hard evidence, there's been a surplus of speculation over the years.

    因為缺乏確鑿的證據,多年來都充斥著各種臆測。

  • Since Emile Boirac introduced déjà vu as a French term meaning "already seen", more than 40 theories attempt to explain this phenomenon.

    從埃米勒·博伊萊克將既視感用法文定義為「似曾相識」後,有超過 40 種理論試圖解釋這個現象。

  • Still, recent advancements in neuroimaging and cognitive psychology narrow down the field of prospects.

    然而,近代的神經成像和認知心理學的發展壓縮了這個領域的可能性。

  • Let's walk through three of today's more prevalent theories using the same restaurant setting for each.

    讓我們套用前面餐廳的假設,用三種目前最普遍的說法來解釋。

  • First up is dual processing.

    首先是雙重歷程理論。

  • We'll need an action.

    用一個動作解釋。

  • Let's go with a waiter dropping a tray of dishes.

    服務生打翻了一盤的菜餚。

  • As the scene unfolds, your brain's hemispheres process a flurry of information: the waiter's flailing arms, his cry for help, the smell of pasta.

    隨著畫面出現,你的腦半球開始處理一連串的資訊: 服務生揮舞雙臂、大喊求援、義大利麵的香味。

  • Within milliseconds, this information zips through pathways and is processed into a single moment.

    在千分之一秒內,這個訊息透過路徑迅速穿梭, 最後合為一個獨立的動作。

  • Most of the time, everything is recorded in-sync.

    大多數的時間,所有事都會被同步記錄在大腦。

  • However, this theory asserts that déjà vu occurs when there's a slight delay in information from one of these pathways.

    這個理論主張若有資訊在大腦途徑之中出現些微延誤,就會出現既視感。

  • The difference in arrival times causes the brain to interpret the late information as a separate event.

    訊息抵達的時間差會使大腦將晚期的資訊解讀成獨立的事件。

  • When it plays over the already-recorded moment, it feels as if it's happened before because, in a sense, it has.

    當大腦播放已記錄過的記憶,感覺就像以前有發生過一樣,因為就某種情況而言,的確是如此。

  • Our next theory deals with a confusion of the past rather than a mistake in the present.

    下個理論是處理過去的混淆,而不是現在的錯誤。

  • This is the hologram theory, and we'll use that tablecloth to examine it.

    這就是全像原理,我們用這張桌布來檢視它。

  • As you scan its squares, a distant memory swims up from deep within your brain.

    你細看上頭的格紋,一段模糊的回憶從你的大腦深處浮現。

  • According to the theory, this is because memories are stored in the form of holograms, and in holograms, you only need one fragment to see the whole picture.

    根據這個理論,是因為記憶是以全像圖的形式儲存在腦中,你只需要一個片段就能看見全部。

  • Your brain has identified the tablecloth with one from the past, maybe from your grandmother's house.

    你的大腦認為以前看過這張桌布,也許和奶奶家裡的是同一張。

  • However, instead of remembering that you've seen this pattern at your grandmother's, your brain has summoned up the old memory without identifying it.

    然而你並沒有想起你在奶奶家中見過這圖案,大腦是喚起了一段久遠的記憶,卻沒有辨認出它。

  • This leaves you stuck with familiarity, but no recollection.

    這讓你產生熟悉感,卻毫無記憶。

  • Although you've never been in this restaurant, you've seen that tablecloth, but are just failing to identify it.

    雖然你從沒去過這間餐廳,但有看過那張桌布,可是卻無法辨認它。

  • Now, look at this fork.

    接下來看看這把叉子。

  • Are you paying attention?

    你有專心看嗎?

  • Our last theory is divided attention, and it states that déjà vu occurs when our brain subliminally takes in an environment while we're distracted by one particular object.

    最後是分散性專注力理論,主張既視感發生於我們分心在某個物件上時,大腦下意識接受了外在環境。

  • When our attention returns, we feel as if we've been here before.

    當我們注意力回歸時,我們會覺得自己以前有來過這裡。

  • For example, just now, you focused on the fork and didn't observe the tablecloth or the falling waiter.

    例如剛才你正專注盯著叉子,完全沒有注意到桌布和要跌倒的服務生。

  • Although your brain has been recording everything in your peripheral vision, it's been doing so below conscious awareness.

    你的大腦以邊緣視野記錄了一切,但都是在自我知覺的狀況下進行。

  • When you finally pull yourself away from the fork, you think you've been here before, because you have, you just weren't paying attention.

    當你終於把注意力從叉子上移開,你會以為你有來過這裡, 因為你有過,只是沒注意到而已。

  • While all three of these theories share the common features of déjà vu, none of them propose to be the conclusive source of the phenomenon.

    儘管以上三種理論皆有掌握既視感常見的特點,卻沒有任何一個能提出這個現象的確定來源。

  • Still, while we wait for researchers and inventers to come up with new ways to capture this fleeting moment, we can study the moment ourselves.

    我們期待研究員與發明家能提出更好的方法,來捕捉這稍縱即逝的瞬間,我們也能自行研究此現象。

  • After all, most studies of déjà vu are based on first-hand accounts, so why can't one be yours?

    畢竟多數既視感的研究都來自第一手的描述,那何不把你的經驗分享出來?

  • The next time you get déjà vu, take a moment to think about it.

    當既視感再度出現時,花點時間想看看。

  • Have you been distracted?

    你是否分心了?

  • Is there a familiar object somewhere?

    四周有沒有熟悉的景物?

  • Is your brain just acting slow?

    是你的大腦突然慢半拍嗎?

  • Or is it something else?

    還是另有其因?

Have you experienced déjà vu?

你有過既視感嗎?

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B1 中級 中文 TED-Ed 大腦 理論 似曾相識 既視感 記憶

【TED-Ed】 既視感到底是怎麼發生的? (What is déjà vu? What is déjà vu? - Michael Molina)

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    Ingo Yang 發佈於 2022 年 04 月 27 日
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