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  • Hi, everybody.

  • Welcome back to Know Your Verbs.

  • My name is Alisha.

  • In this episode, we're going to talk about the verb, "move."

  • Let's look at the basic meaning of the verb, "move."

  • So, the basic definition of the verb, "move" is to go to a different place or a different

  • condition.

  • Let's look at the conjugations of this verb.

  • Present, “move,” “moves.”

  • Past, “moved.”

  • Past participle, “moved.”

  • Progressive, “moving.”

  • Now, let's talk about some additional meanings of this verb.

  • The first additional meaning for today is to persuade or to prompt someone to do something.

  • Some example of this, “We were moved to act when we saw the destruction after the

  • disaster.”

  • The documentary moved me to volunteer in my community.”

  • In both of these examples, we used the verb, "moved," in this case, to explain being prompted

  • to do something.

  • In the first example sentence, I said, “We were moved to act,” means to take action,

  • to do something, “because of a disaster.”

  • So, in this case, the speaker saw disaster, the horrible damage from a disaster and the

  • speaker and someone else were moved, they were persuaded or prompted to take action.

  • So, in the second example sentence, we see the same thing.

  • The documentary moved me to volunteer in my community.”

  • Here we see the same pattern, “movedplus the infinitive form.

  • Moved to act,” moved to volunteer in my community.

  • So, in this case, “I was moved to volunteer in my community because of a documentary.”

  • So, the documentary prompted me or persuaded me to volunteer.

  • So, we can usemoveto mean like push us or persuade us to do something.

  • So, meaning 2 is to activate emotions or feelings.

  • Example of the second meaning, “The movie moved me to tears.”

  • We were so moved by your generosity.”

  • So, here, we're usingmovedto refer to an activation of our emotion.

  • In the first example sentence, “The movie moved me to tears.”

  • In this case, moved me to tears is like, it moved me so much, it activated my emotions

  • so much that I began to cry.

  • Actually, that's a common set expression, “move me to tears.”

  • Something was so emotionally charged that I began to cry as a result.

  • In the second example sentence, “We were so moved by your generosity,” means that

  • your generosity,” the listener, did something very generous and that caused the speaker

  • to feel strong emotions or their emotions were activated or stirred or roused.

  • So, in these example sentences, “moved,” refers to strong emotional responses to something.

  • The third meaning is to make a make a formal proposal for something.

  • We usemoveto suggest something.

  • It's often used in law or legal proceedings but we can use it as well in casual situations

  • if we want to make the proposal seem more formal somehow.

  • Examples, “I move to end this discussion.”

  • He moved to postpone the next meeting for the week.”

  • Here, in the first example sentence, “I move to end the discussion,” it means, I

  • propose that we end the discussion.

  • But, to say, “I movesounds more formal, actually, kind of more legal a bit.

  • In the second example sentence, “He moved to postpone the next meeting for a week.”

  • We're seeingmovedused to mean proposed again.

  • He proposed that we postpone the meeting,” in other words.

  • Propose is fine but you could substitute that like, “He proposed we postpone the meeting,”

  • or, “I propose we end this discussion,” but, “movejust have kind of a legal

  • sound to it.

  • The fourth meaning I want to talk about in this episode is to change residence or just

  • to change your house, in other words.

  • Examples, “I'm thinking about moving this summer.”

  • Have you ever moved to a new city?”

  • Here, “movejust means move your house but we only usemove.”

  • We don't say, “move apartmentormove house.”

  • Maybe in British English, “move houseis used.

  • But, in American English, we just usemove.”

  • “I need to move,” “I have to move,” or, “I hate moving,” for example.

  • So, just use move to mean changing your house.

  • Usually, from the context, from the discussion, we can understand which kind of move is meant.

  • It doesn't mean that you're taking your house and you're moving your house somewhere.

  • It means that you're taking your body, you're moving your body to a new residence, a new

  • home and go in there.

  • Let's talk about some variations of the verb, “to move.”

  • The first variation isto move [products].”

  • This means to sell things or to have transactions in something.

  • Some examples, “The sales team has been moving a lot of merchandise lately!”

  • We need to move a lot of inventory next month.”

  • These example sentences mean sell something.

  • The sales team has been moving a lot of merchandise,” means the sales team has been

  • selling a lot of things, has been doing transactions of some kind.

  • In the second example sentence, “We need to move a lot of inventory next month,”

  • means we need to sell a lot of things from our inventory but we just used the verb, “move

  • to make that shorter.

  • So, instead of, “We need to sell a lot of products,” we can say, “We need to move

  • a lot of inventory,” instead.

  • Those are a few new meanings of the verb, “move.”

  • If you have any questions or if you want to try to make a sentence with this verb, please

  • feel free to do so in the comments section.

  • If you like the video, please make sure to give it a thumbs up, subscribe to the channel

  • if you haven't already and check us out at EnglichClass101.com for some other good

  • resources.

  • Thanks very much for watching this episode of Know Your Verbs and I'll see you again

  • soon.

  • Bye.

  • I really have other variations but just couple of pop culture references.

  • We see the verb, “movelike in Star Wars.

  • Obi Wan Kenobi says to the Storm Troopers, they had that famous line, “These aren't

  • the droids you're looking for.

  • Move along.

  • Move along.”

  • Ahh.

  • He's referring to kind of like move your body.

  • Leave from this place.

  • There is a meaning of this verb which is like to leave or to depart somewhere.

  • But, I think we can understand that pretty much with just the basic form of the verb,

  • to move,” like, “Let's move.”

  • Let's go,” in other words.

  • The same thing with Obi Wan's line, “Move along.”

  • Move yourself.

  • Yeah, there is that.

  • To move out,” to move out of a place means to leave a residence or to move out

  • of an apartment, to move out of the house means to leave that apartment or to leave

  • that house.

  • So, “I'm moving out of my apartment.”

  • We could say that or “I'm moving to a new house,” “I'm moving out of my apartment.”

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MOVE - 基本動詞 - 學習英語語法 (MOVE - Basic Verbs - Learn English Grammar)

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