Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hello World, Greg here.

  • Ever wondered what a brand new Japanese home looks like?

  • Well you're watching this, so I guess so, let's go check one out.

  • But first we'll have one of our friendly neighbourhood real estate agents

  • introduce himself.

  • I'm Tomita from Sanshin Realty. Nice to meet you.

  • The most popular house with buyers is a 4LDK with a garage.

  • Oh right, what does 4LDK mean?

  • L is for Living room, D is for dining room,

  • and K is for kitchen.

  • 4 is the number of bedrooms.

  • Homes usually have two toilets, and what's common and a big selling feature

  • is a big large living room, dining room, and kitchen area.

  • Ok, now it's time to enter, please meet our guide.

  • I'm Junichi Goto from Sanshin Realty.

  • Is this a normal, average new house?

  • It's a new detached house.

  • Is it a typical house?

  • It's a typical house.

  • Hahaha.

  • Alright, I should explain the laughter.

  • We were laughing a bit because John and I thought this was a bit more expensive

  • than the average house, or at least what the average household could afford.

  • How much is this house?

  • It's ¥45,800,000.

  • And we weren't wrong. These homes, which as of today

  • works out to be about $400,000 US dollars

  • are about $100,000 above being affordable for families

  • making the median household income (¥4,880,000JPY/$43,500USD)in Edogawa,

  • which is a ward within Tokyo Metropolis.

  • I think the average annual income of buyers are between

  • ¥3,000,000 and ¥5,000,000 (USD$26,000 to USD$44,000)

  • But to be fair to Goto-san,

  • it's fairly close to the average price of new homes I saw

  • when touring around Edogawa.

  • Anyways, let's get back to the tour.

  • Here's where you can park your car.

  • You can even park a pretty big van.

  • Up here is a light.

  • Over here you can place your family name plate.

  • This is an intercom.

  • It has a camera

  • so you can see visitors.

  • This is the entrance area.

  • This might be unique to Japanese homes.

  • And this is where you have to take off your shoes.

  • This is a door stopper.

  • This protects the walls from being damaged.

  • There's a magnet

  • on both the door and the floor

  • and you can step right on it without it being in the way.

  • Wow, amazing!

  • Sorry, if you've ever watched Japanese tv,

  • that oo, sugoi is a pretty typical reaction :-)

  • Something that might be surprising, is that until recently,

  • single pane windows were the norm in homes,

  • but times have changed.

  • Over here is the window in a bedroom on the first floor.

  • This is a special double-pane window.

  • This is the same window, but

  • this one makes it hard to see inside from the outside.

  • Windows like this use special glass

  • so that you can have

  • privacy from neighbours.

  • This is a 24-hour vent that can circulate air throughout

  • the whole house. When you push, it opens.

  • In order to get air into the room from outside,

  • you push it open.

  • When you're away like on a family trip,

  • you can circulate the air.

  • Just push this panel to close it.

  • Push it a little bit, a little bit, a little bit.

  • Now we're going to enter the second room

  • on the ground floor.

  • This access panel is inside this room on the first floor.

  • So what you can do with this,

  • is open it up here.

  • From this access point,

  • service people can maintain

  • the gas and water pipes.

  • And here's the 3rd room on the first floor.

  • There is the TV outlet.

  • This is the closet.

  • Talking about houses in Tokyo,

  • land is limited,

  • so you may have neighbours close to you.

  • So on the first floor,

  • there are special shutters on the windows.

  • You close it and you're fine.

  • You do it like 1, 2, 3.

  • If you try to open it,

  • it won't.

  • As I was watching the demonstration,

  • I thought, the locks are nice and all,

  • but are home burglaries even an issue in Japan?

  • Turns out nope, they're not.

  • Now let's peruse the last room on the first floor, the restroom.

  • This is a toilet washlet.

  • On this single panel, you have buttons for males and females,

  • for the strength of water,

  • to move the spray forwards or backwards,

  • and to flush the toilet.

  • On the panel there's a button to warm up the seat.You'll really like it in winter.

  • Hot water's next. You can change the temp. This washlet has functions like this.

  • And I agree 100% that a warm seat on a cold day is glorious,

  • especially since central heating is virtually non-existent in Japanese homes.

  • This is called barrier free

  • and this railing is for elders to hold on to for their safety.

  • When we go up to the second floor, we see the living room.

  • As you can probably imagine,

  • you can put a TV here,

  • a sofa here,

  • and the family can gather.

  • This is an intercom

  • with a camera.

  • When you hit this button,

  • the outdoor camera

  • will show who's visiting,

  • and you can see the face on the monitor.

  • And you can also talk to the person.

  • From my experience touring new houses,

  • interphones are quite standard,

  • but I'd say this next floor heating feature is not.

  • Over here is the floor heating.

  • This control panel is for setting

  • the floor heating in the living room area.

  • This is the dining and kitchen area.

  • A mother can cook the food over here,

  • and the children can wait here,

  • and get the food like this

  • and eat here.

  • Ah, the good old image of the stay-at-home mom making meals for the kids.

  • The space is designed so you can see everywhere.

  • You can easily watch kids playing;

  • it's very convenient.

  • Over here, behind me, you can put the fridge.

  • And here, you can put the cupboard.

  • In the cupboard you can put your rice cooker.

  • You can use the space for whatever you want, like storing food.

  • You can spray all around the sink with the shower head.

  • Inside the sink faucet there's a water purifier cartridge.

  • It's in shower mode now, and this changes it to regular water,

  • and then purified water.

  • Down here is a gas stove.

  • You can take apart this stove and it's easy to clean.

  • Down here you can push buttons like this.

  • In here you can cook fish.

  • You can use these to control the temperature.

  • This is a lock in case your child pushes this.

  • It won't work when it's locked.

  • As you can see, full sized ovens are not usually built-in,

  • but sometimes you will see small dishwashers.

  • In the kitchen you can find a dishwasher.

  • There's a plenty of storage space. You can store pots like this.

  • On the side of the kitchen, there's a remote control panel for the bathtub.

  • You don't have to go to the bathroom. From the kitchen you can do everything.

  • By the way, you need a control panel,

  • because the water heater is on demand and tankless.

  • Over here's the washroom.

  • Of course, you can use this for the water temperature,

  • and then shower...

  • There's a 3 panel mirror here.

  • If you do this, you can see your whole body.

  • Haha, we can see ourselves, look.

  • Oh, are you in the mirror? Sorry.

  • It's OK, it's OK.

  • Over here you can put the washing machine.

  • You guys don't use dryers in Japan, right?

  • You can plug in the hair dryer here.

  • Oh, I'm not talking about a hair dryer.

  • Ah, a laundry dryer? No.

  • While there is typically no spot for a vented dryer,

  • you can get 2-in-1 washer/dryer models that

  • don't require a vent and can fit in a space like that.

  • Instead, we have this over here, isn't this good?

  • From here you can go straight into the bathroom.

  • Like the kitchen, there's a control panel.

  • On a cold day, you can put the heater on,

  • and on a hot day, you can push this cold air button.

  • When it's moist in the bathroom, there's a fan.

  • And for laundry on a rainy day, if you hit this dryer button,

  • you can dry your laundry on a rainy day.

  • This is the bathtub.

  • Maybe it's unique to Japan,

  • there's not only a shower, there's also a tub.

  • Over here, when you take a bath with little children,

  • you can still have space and sit down.

  • There'd be water up to here,

  • and you can take a bath with your children like this.

  • In case you didn't know, bathing with family members is quite common and normal in Japan.

  • Over here's the shower.

  • You take a shower standing up, and when sitting down, can control the height.

  • From here you can sit down and take a shower.

  • Over here there's a shower and underneath there's a faucet.

  • You can place a bucket here to keep water in.

  • This is for when you want to put water in the bath,

  • this is to reheat the water when it gets cold.

  • And over here there's more settings.

  • The bathroom floor is easy to clean.

  • The water will swirl around and this will catch stuff like hair.

  • You can then unscrew it and clean it.

  • In older bath units, the drainage area also goes under the bath tub.

  • Thankfully newer units seal off the bath tub and there's only

  • this one small drainage area to worry about cleaning.

  • From the washroom, you can use this door to get to the bathroom.

  • So you enter and when you come out you can put your towel here.

  • I don't know if this is completely obvious,

  • but in Japan, the bathing room is separate from the sink,

  • which is separate from the toilet, so three people can use the area at the same time.

  • In addition to the 1st floor toilet, there's one on the 2nd floor. Inside it's the same.

  • From the 2nd floor, you can go upstairs to the 3rd floor. So let's go up.

  • On the third floor in the hallway there's a closet.

  • This is the third floor bedroom.

  • There are so many laws when you build a house in Japan,

  • and because builders have to follow the laws,

  • over here you can see how the ceiling in this room is slanted.

  • If we take a look at the outside, you'll see the slant he's talking about.

  • While houses can be built extremely close to each other,

  • there are rules to ensure that each house can receive

  • a certain amount of daylight sun hours.

  • This closet over here is different from the closet on the first floor.

  • It's a walk-in closet and it even has a light.

  • From the room on the 3rd floor you can access this balcony.

  • On this balcony you hang your laundry out.

  • Every room, the stairway, the kitchen, and so on,

  • have a smoke detector.

  • Over here in this room up here is a smoke detector.

  • Here I go!

  • You can do it! You can do it!

  • Peep. It's working.

  • That was a test.

  • This is a room on the third floor,

  • and just like the other rooms, it has no lock.

  • In Japan, only the toilets and bathing rooms have locks.

  • I think that while you want privacy in your room,

  • it's only really family living in the house, so there are no locks.

  • Another reason for no locks in rooms is

  • so that the kids can't lock themselves in.

  • When houses are built in Japan,

  • they're built according to building codes and laws.

  • In order to ensure the house is structurally sound,

  • but still has a wide open space like this,

  • the four beams at the corners need to be exposed.

  • Even though it needs to be designed like this, isn't it stylish?

  • On the balcony, laundry racks are attached.

  • First, you can adjust the height. This makes it level.

  • To use it, you can raise it like this, and also adjust the height down.

  • The third stage is for when it's not in use, and you store it like this.

  • While we previously saw that the bathroom has a heater fan built-in,

  • the most common method for drying clothes is still to hang dry them outside.

  • As such, balconies are a standard feature.