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  • David and I are just two peas in a pod.

  • In this video, we're going to go over idioms relating to vegetables.

  • This is a follow-up video to the video we did last week on vegetable vocabulary.

  • 00:00:18,900 --> 00:00:24,000 Two peas in the pod. This means two people that get along very, very well.

  • Yeah.

  • And our son, Stoney, and his little best buddy Elias are two peas in a pod when they're together.

  • We went to the zoo with them recently and the kids are just running around having a great time together.

  • Yeah whenever we tell him that we're going to go see Elias,

  • all he does is say: "Elias! Elias! Elias!" until we get there.

  • That's right.

  • They're so cute.

  • Mushroom.

  • When something mushrooms, this means it gets much bigger.

  • You can think of a mushroom stem, and then the cap of the mushroom is much bigger.

  • Do you have an example of how you can use the verb mushroom in a sentence?

  • We were watching one of our recent guilty pleasures, the TV show about home renovations, and they

  • they were going to take out this wall

  • and it looked pretty simple, and I open up the wall and they found that beehive

  • inside the wall and all these bees shot out.

  • So it look like a little project just moving a wall but the project mushroomed,

  • became much bigger because they had to get rid of the bees.

  • Mm-hmm.

  • You could also use the word 'balloon' as a verb in exactly the same way.

  • When something unexpectedly gets much bigger.

  • The phrase 'to spill the beans' this means to tell a secret.

  • So if you have an important secret, you want to entrust it to somebody that you know will not spill the beans.

  • I had a friend recently tell me she was pregnant, but she wasn't telling everybody yet.

  • So I had to keep it to myself.

  • She said: You're not going to spill the beans, are you? I said: No. My lips are sealed.

  • My lips are sealed, of course, means I won't tell anybody.

  • It doesn't literally mean...

  • It means they're good at keeping a secret.

  • Couch potato.

  • This is somebody who is lazy, who spends a lot of time on the couch,

  • watching TV, and maybe eating potato chips.

  • Right.

  • And are you feeling like that?

  • I'm feeling like that.

  • I am 35 weeks pregnant and there just hits a certain point in the day where I have no energy,

  • and I just lay down on the couch, I have people bring me things as need, I am definitely a couch potato right now.

  • Couch potato.

  • We also have the term 'hot potato'.

  • So if a potato is really hot, `you can't really, you don't want to touch it, you want to throw it up in the air.

  • Idiomatically, it means a topic that is very controversial,

  • and you might not want to touch it because there's such strong opinions on either side of the topic.

  • Yeah and an example would be social security, which is part of our social welfare safety net in the US,

  • and politicians don't want to touch it because it benefits older Americans who vote in high numbers,

  • and who have contributed to that system across their entire working life.

  • And so any threat of decreasing the benefits for Social Security is a political non-starter.

  • It's a hot potato. Nobody wants to touch that.

  • Even know the system, kind of is really in trouble.

  • Needs some help.

  • And the way that it's structured is going to be really problematic, still, nobody wants to touch it.

  • Hot potato.

  • Another potato idiom 'small potatoes'.

  • This is also 'small peanuts'.

  • In our podcast, where we were doing food idioms,

  • I talked about small peanuts ,and it has the exact same meaning.

  • It's... It means not important, or less important.

  • And I sometimes feel this way when I go to a YouTube event and there are other

  • really big YouTubers there with the really big numbers.

  • I feel like I'm pretty small potatoes at a place like that.

  • Cool as a cucumber. Have you heard this one before?

  • This idiom means very level-headed, very...doesn't get anxious, doesn't get stressed out.

  • Just really is able to take things in, do stuff well, stay focused.

  • And my example for this is my friend Justin.

  • So actually, in most of life, I am cool as a cucumber myself, I would say.

  • Pretty even, but on the soccer field,

  • I sort of, I'm kind of a hothead, I have a little bit of a temper, I'm all over the place.

  • It's weird. I noticed that the one time I went to one of your games, I was like who is this guy.

  • Um, I played in college. It's always been something that I'm really competitive about.

  • It's one of the few things.

  • Anyway, I'm a hothead but my buddy Justin, who I always play with, he's cool as a cucumber.

  • Nothing ruffles his feathers.

  • And if he sees me getting a little bit out of line, it'll kind of reign me in.

  • Wow, you used so many good phrases there.

  • Reign me in, you used ruffle... Ruffle his feathers, nothing can ruffle his feathers.

  • >> That's true. >> And you also said you're a hothead.

  • So someone who's a hothead sort of has a bit of a temper is a little aggressive,

  • so you're a hothead only on the soccer field.

  • Right.

  • If someone 'ruffles your feathers', that means they bother you.

  • You could also say they 'get under my skin'.

  • Yeah.

  • So like someone who's playing really aggressively with you may be crossing the line, another idiom,

  • of like a foul.

  • That might ruffle your feathers.

  • Quite a bit.

  • And then Justin reigns you in.

  • That means if you're getting a little too hot-headed, he comes over and he says: hey man, chill out, it's fine.

  • >> That's right. >> Bring it back to normal.

  • >>That's right. >>Okay.

  • Well, sometimes when you're

  • talking about it idiom, it's so hard to describe situations without using other idioms.

  • >> It really is. >> It's incredible.

  • 'Carrot-top' this is a phrase that you might use for somebody who has red hair.

  • Top of the head, carrot.

  • Carrot top.

  • There's actually a comedian who I feel like was somewhat famous when I was growing up,

  • who went by the name Carrot Top. It was his stage name because he had orange hair.

  • The phrase 'to pass or extend the olive branch'.

  • This is like when you've had an argument with somebody, and you make the first move

  • to reconcile with them, to make up, to be friendly, that's you extending an olive branch.

  • Those are some of the vegetable idioms we thought of. Can you think of any other vegetable idioms?

  • Put them in the comments below.

  • And if you missed the video last week on vegetable vocabulary, be sure to check it out.

  • There are some interesting things to learn there.

  • David, thanks so much for joining me for this video.

  • That's it guys and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

David and I are just two peas in a pod.

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成語英語口語練習與9個與蔬菜有關的成語 RACHEL S ENGLISH (IDIOMS ENGLISH SPEAKING PRACTICE WITH 9 IDIOMS RELATING TO VEGETABLES RACHEL S ENGLISH)

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    niv 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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