Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • This is me at age seven.

    譯者: Lilian Chiu 審譯者: Helen Chang

  • And this is also me.

    這是我七歲的時候。

  • (Applause and cheering)

    這也是我。

  • To be standing here in Kakuma refugee camp feels so surreal,

    (掌聲與歡呼)

  • and I'm overcome with so much emotion.

    站在卡庫馬難民營這裡, 感覺好不真實,

  • These very grounds are where I was born

    我現在有著滿滿的情緒。

  • and spent the first seven years of my life.

    這就是我出生的地方,

  • I think many people are surprised to hear

    我人生的前七年也都待在這裡。

  • that I had a great upbringing here at Kakuma.

    我想,很多人會覺得無法相信

  • But I was happy,

    我在卡庫馬有受到很好的養育。

  • I was smart, I had friends

    但我那時很開心,

  • and above all, I had hope for a brighter future.

    我很聰明,我有朋友,

  • That's not to say that we didn't have our obstacles.

    最重要的是, 我嚮往著更明亮的未來。

  • I mean, boy were there struggles.

    並不是說我們沒有遇到阻礙。

  • I would sometimes get sick with malaria

    我的意思是,真的有過掙扎。

  • and didn't always know where our next meal would come from.

    我有時候會得到瘧疾,

  • But the sense of community that is here in Kakuma

    且不見得都知道下一餐會從哪裡來。

  • and the pride that everyone here possesses

    但在卡庫馬這裡,共同體的感覺

  • is simply unparalleled.

    以及這裡每個人所擁有的驕傲

  • When I was younger, I remember conflicts breaking out.

    實在是空前未有的。

  • That tends to happen when people come from different backgrounds

    我比較小的時候,我記得衝突爆發。

  • and don't speak the same language.

    當有來自不同背景的人 說著不相同的語言時,

  • Eventually, Swahili --

    本來就很容易發生衝突。

  • the main language here --

    最終,斯華西里語——

  • became our common ground.

    這裡的主要語言——

  • I made friends with the kids at the camp

    變成了我們的共同點。

  • and even started embracing some of their cultures,

    我和難民營的孩子交朋友,

  • celebrating holidays like Christmas even though I was raised Muslim.

    甚至開始接受一些他們的文化,

  • The other kids would embrace my culture as well,

    雖然我成長過程都信回教, 我也慶祝像是聖誕節等節日。

  • sometimes even praying right alongside me.

    其他的孩子也會接受我的文化,

  • It was easy, as children, to come together,

    有時甚至就在我旁邊一起禱告。

  • blend all of our beliefs

    身為孩子,很容易就能團結,

  • to form our own unique, multicultural environment.

    融合我們的信仰,

  • My name is Halima Aden

    形成我們自己 獨一無二的多文化環境。

  • and I'm a black, Muslim, Somali-American from Kenya.

    我的名字叫哈利馬阿登,

  • (Applause)

    我是個索瑪利裔美國黑人, 來自肯亞,信奉回教。

  • Some have called me a trailblazer --

    (掌聲)

  • I was the first Muslim homecoming queen at my high school,

    有些人把我稱為先驅——

  • the first Somali student senator at my college

    在我的高中,我是第一個 信奉回教的返校日皇后,

  • and the first hijab-wearing woman in many places,

    在我的大學,我是第一個 索瑪利裔的學生會委員,

  • like the Miss Minnesota USA beauty pageant,

    在許多地方,我是 第一個戴頭巾的女性,

  • the runways of Milan and New York Fashion Weeks

    比如明尼蘇達州小姐選美比賽、

  • and even on the historic cover of British "Vogue."

    米蘭及紐約時裝週的伸展台,

  • As you can see,

    甚至上了具有里程碑意義的 英國《時尚》雜誌封面。

  • I'm not afraid to be the first, to step out on my own,

    如你們所見,

  • to take risks and seek change,

    我並不害怕自己站出來當第一個,

  • because that's what being a minority is about.

    我敢承擔風險和尋求改變,

  • It's about using yourself as a vessel to create change

    因為那就是身為少數族群應該做的。

  • and being a human representation for the power of diversity.

    重點是要把自己當作 創造改變的媒介,

  • And now I use my platform to spread an important message of acceptance.

    把多樣性的力量 在人的身上展現出來。

  • But it hasn't always been easy.

    現在,我用我的平台來散播一則 關於接受的重要訊息。

  • When we first arrived to the United States and made St. Louis, Missouri home,

    但過程並非都很容易。

  • I remember asking my mom, "Is this really America?"

    當我們初次抵達美國, 以密蘇里的聖路易斯為家時,

  • There were things that were sadly familiar,

    我記得我問我母親: 「這真的是美國嗎?」

  • like hearing gunshots at night

    有些事物,有著悲傷的熟悉感,

  • and the streets looking impoverished.

    比如在夜間聽到槍聲,

  • But there were things that were also very different.

    及街道看來赤貧無創造性。

  • Like when I started first grade,

    但也有些非常不同的地方。

  • I noticed how the kids played in groups.

    比如,當我上一年級時,

  • In America, we call them "cliques."

    我注意到孩子們如何分群玩耍。

  • Back here, we all played together.

    在美國,我們稱他們為「朋黨」。

  • Gender didn't matter,

    以前在這裡時,我們全都玩在一起。

  • and race most certainly never mattered.

    性別無所謂,

  • I remember asking myself,

    種族也肯定從來都無所謂。

  • "Why don't they understand Swahili?

    我記得我會問我自己:

  • Swahili is the language that brings people together."

    「他們為什麼不懂斯華西里語?

  • To make matters worse,

    斯華西里語是讓人 團結在一起的語言。」

  • the school I was enrolled in didn't have an English immersion program.

    更糟的是,

  • So everyday I would get up,

    我就讀的學校並沒有沉浸英語學程。

  • go to school, sit in my desk

    所以,我每天爬起床,

  • and never learn a thing.

    去上學,坐在我的座位上,

  • This is when I started losing hope,

    什麼都學不到。

  • and I wanted nothing more than return to Kakuma,

    這時,我開始失去希望,

  • a refugee camp.

    我只想返回卡庫馬,

  • Soon, my mother learned that many Somalis found refuge

    回到難民營。

  • in a small town in Minnesota.

    很快的,我母親得知 有許多索馬利人

  • So when I was eight, we moved to Minnesota.

    在明尼蘇達的一個小鎮安定下來。

  • My life changed as I met other students who spoke Somali,

    所以,我八歲時, 我們搬到明尼蘇達。

  • attended a school that had an English immersion program

    我的人生改變了, 因為我遇到了其他索瑪利學生,

  • and found teachers that would go above and beyond,

    我就讀的學校有沉浸英語學程,

  • staying there after school hours and lunch breaks,

    也找到一些老師,願意額外付出,

  • dedicated to helping me find success in the classroom.

    在學校放學之後 以及午餐時間留下來,

  • Being a child refugee has taught me that one could be stripped of everything:

    努力協助我能在教室中有所成。

  • food, shelter, clean drinking water,

    身為難民小孩,我學到的是, 一個人隨時可能被奪走一切:

  • even friendship,

    食物、庇護所、乾淨的飲用水、

  • but the one thing that no one could ever take away from you

    甚至友誼,

  • is your education.

    但有一樣東西,是別人 無法從你身上奪走的,

  • So I made studying my top priority

    就是你的教育。

  • and soon started flourishing within the classroom.

    所以我把讀書放在第一優先,

  • As I grew older, I became more aware of others

    很快就開始在教室裡有好的表現。

  • and how they viewed my race and background.

    隨著我長大, 我越來越能意識到其他人

  • Specifically, when I started wearing the head scarf known as a hijab.

    及他們如何看待我的種族和背景。

  • When I first started wearing it, I was excited.

    特別是當我開始包頭巾, 也就是希賈布時。

  • I remember admiring my mother's, and I wanted to emulate her beauty.

    我一開始包頭巾時,我很興奮。

  • But when I started middle school,

    我記得我很欣賞我母親的頭巾, 想要模仿她的美麗。

  • the students teased me about not having hair,

    但當我讀中學時,

  • so to prove them wrong,

    其他學生會嘲笑我沒有頭髮,

  • I started showing them my hair --

    為了證明他們錯了,

  • something that goes against my beliefs, but something I felt pressured to do.

    我開始讓他們看見我的頭髮——

  • I wanted so badly to fit in at the time.

    這是違背我的信仰的, 但我感到有壓力迫使我去做。

  • When I reflect on the issues of race, religion, identity,

    那時我非常想要融入大家。

  • a lot of painful memories come to mind.

    當我反思關於種族、 宗教、身分的議題時,

  • It would be easy for me to blame those of another culture

    許多痛苦的記憶會浮現腦海。

  • for making me feel the pain I felt,

    對我來說,把我所感受到的痛苦

  • but when I think deeper,

    怪罪其他文化的人是比較容易的,

  • I also recognize that the most impactful,

    但當我更深入思考,

  • positive, life-changing events that have happened to me

    我也了解到,這些事是我所遇過

  • are thanks to those people who are different than me.

    最有影響力、最正面、 改變我人生最多的事,

  • It was at this moment that I decided to step outside of my comfort zone

    這一切都要感謝那些和我不同的人。

  • and compete in a pageant wearing a hijab and burkini.

    在那一刻,我決定 要踏出我的舒適圈,

  • I saw it as an opportunity to be a voice for women

    包著頭巾,穿著蒙面罩袍 去參加選美比賽。

  • who, like myself, had felt underrepresented.

    我把它視為一個機會,讓我可以

  • And although I didn't capture the crown,

    為和我一樣的弱勢女性發聲。

  • that experience opened so many doors for me.

    雖然我沒有贏得后冠,

  • I was receiving emails and messages from women all over the world,

    那次的經驗為我打開了好多扇門。

  • telling me that I've inspired them by simply staying true to myself.

    我收到世界各地女性 寫給我的電子郵件和訊息,

  • The other "firsts" kept coming.

    她們說,光是看到我能夠 忠於自己,就讓她們受到鼓舞。

  • I was invited to New York City by fashion icon Carine Roitfeld

    我不斷繼續當「第一個」。

  • to shoot my very first editorial.

    我受到時尚界代表人物 卡琳洛菲德的邀請,前往紐約,

  • It was around this time that I became the first hijab-wearing model,

    拍攝我的第一張時尚雜誌照片。

  • and in my first year,

    大約在這個時期,我成為了 第一個包著頭巾的模特兒,

  • I graced the covers of nine fashion magazines.

    在我的頭一年,

  • It was a whirlwind, to say the least.

    我上了七本時尚雜誌的封面。

  • But with all the overnight success,

    至少可以說,這是場旋風。

  • there was one thing that remained constant --

    但在這所有的一夜成名的成功中,

  • the thought that this could be what brings me back here to Kakuma,

    有一樣東西是維持不變的——

  • the place that I call home.

    認為我能夠因此有機會 回到卡庫馬的想法,

  • And just a few months ago, something incredible happened to me.

    回到我稱為家的地方。

  • I was in New York City, on a photo shoot,

    幾個月前,很不可思議的事 發生在我身上。

  • when I met South Sudanese model Adut Akech,

    我當時在紐約,正在拍照,

  • who also happened to be born right here in Kakuma.

    我遇見了南蘇丹的模特兒 阿度特艾凱奇,

  • That experience in itself is the definition of hope.

    她剛好也出生在卡庫馬。

  • I mean, just imagine:

    那段經驗本身就是希望的定義。

  • two girls born in the same refugee camp,

    我的意思是,想像一下:

  • reunited for the first time on the cover of British "Vogue."

    出生在同一個難民營的兩個女孩,

  • (Applause and cheering)

    在英國《時尚》雜誌的封面上 第一次團聚在一起。

  • I was given the distinct pleasure of partnering up with UNICEF,

    (掌聲與歡呼)

  • knowing firsthand the work that they do for children in need.

    我有非常獨特的榮幸, 能和聯合國兒童基金會合作,

  • And I want you to remember

    直接了解他們為 有需要的兒童做了什麼。

  • that although the children here may be refugees,

    我希望各位能記住,

  • they are children.

    雖然這裡的孩子可能是難民,

  • They deserve every opportunity to flourish, to hope, to dream --

    他們仍然是孩子。

  • to be successful.

    他們應該要有機會去成長、 去希望、去夢想——

  • My story began right here in Kakuma refugee camp,

    去成功。

  • a place of hope.

    這裡,卡庫馬難民營, 是我的故事的起點,

  • Thank you.

    它是個希望之地。

  • (Applause)

    謝謝。

This is me at age seven.

譯者: Lilian Chiu 審譯者: Helen Chang

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級 中文 美國腔 TED 頭巾 難民營 時尚 雜誌 封面

TED】哈利瑪-亞丁:我是如何從兒童難民變成國際模範的(我是如何從兒童難民變成國際模範的|哈利瑪-亞丁)。 (【TED】Halima Aden: How I went from child refugee to international model (How I went from child refugee to international model | Halima Aden))

  • 1661 90
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字