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  • Hello everyone, in this video I'm going to show you how to make a knife using only very

  • basic, everyday tools.

  • So if you're someone who wants to get into knifemaking but you don't have the forge or

  • anvil or grinder or anything like that, I just wanted to show you that it can be done

  • using only minimal tools.

  • So here are the materials we're going to use for our knife.

  • This is a bar of 1080 steel, 1/8 inch thick by 1 1/4 inch wide.

  • If you want to use something like O1 or 5160 that's just as good, 1080 is easy to heat

  • treat so it's very simple.

  • For the handle I have a piece of walnut I had laying around.

  • And some 1/8 inch brass rod for the pins.

  • And I'll also be showing you how to make a knife sheath, so get some vegetable tanned

  • leather for that.

  • So these are all the tools we're going to use to make the knife.

  • First of these are some files for shaping the metal and wood.

  • The most important of these is probably going to be this flat bastard file for shaping steel.

  • And a word of advice, make sure your file is sharp, if you use a dull file to shape

  • your metal you're going to spend hours and hours filing and in the end your product is

  • going to look worse because you can't get as accurate of a cut.

  • So if you haven't already, treat yourself to a good file before you start.

  • Secondly are some saws, a wood saw and a hacksaw for cutting metal, and again make sure make

  • sure you have sharp blades, otherwise you'll spend hours.

  • We'll also need some clamps for clamping the material down while we work with it.

  • I just have some C-clamps here.

  • Also a vise is very handy if you have one, but not strictly necessary.

  • A cordless drill for drilling holes, and a sharpening stone.

  • And if you're going to make a sheath you'll need some needles for sewing it together.

  • You'll also need some sandpaper of various grits, 2-part epoxy for gluing the knife together,

  • some vegetable oil for hardening the knife, and heat treating it.

  • And some boiled linseed oil or other wood finish for finishing the handle.

  • So we have the basic shape cut out, and now we'll just file the rest of it to shape.

  • Now we have to mark out where we want to grind the steel.

  • So I want my grind to be about here, and about here.

  • And we also want to scribe a center line down here so our bevel is straight.

  • So a trick to do that is to color in the edge with a Sharpie.

  • Or use layout dye, if you're fancy and you have layout dye.

  • And just take a drill bit.

  • This is 1/8 inch steel so 1/8 inch drill bit, lay it on its side and-

  • And I don't know if this drill bit is centered so I'll flip it over halfway and mark another

  • one.

  • Then we have a nice little center line that we can file to.

  • And now we're just going to file the bevel in.

  • There are jigs for this where it keeps the file at a certain angle but I'm just going

  • to give it a shot by hand.

  • It shouldn't be too bad as long as you keep the file straight and even as you file.

  • Alright, so I'm going to lay out where I want the pins to be in my handle.

  • I'm going to center punch these holes prior to drilling them.

  • If you have a center punch I'd highly recommend doing this.

  • But if you don't, just try to be accurate.

  • Okay, so here I'm going to drill the holes.

  • Notice how I have it on a pretty low surface so I can bear down on the drill and sight

  • to make sure I have the drill straight.

  • You don't want the pins to be at an angle.

  • So here's our knife blank, you can see it has all the holes drilled in it.

  • You can see there I drilled the hole in the wrong spot so we're going to use that one.

  • So now we need to heat treat it.

  • And in order to do that we need to heat it up to critical temperature, which is a bright

  • red heat, and quench it in oil in order to harden it.

  • So if you have some method of heating it up, if you have a propane torch or an oxy-acetylene

  • torch that would be great, but if you don't, let me show you: how to make your own forge

  • with this one simple trick!

  • We'll want to normalize the metal, which means heat it up to critical temperature like this,

  • and then let it cool off slowly in the air.

  • This will reduce the stress in the metal so it won't crack or have any deformities when

  • we heat treat it.

  • So while the knife is cooling off I'm just going to heat up this piece of rod and quench

  • it in the oil to preheat it.

  • Alright, so you can actually see how hot this is, this is like forge welding temperature.

  • So you could actually use this forge for pretty much anything.

  • It gets really hot, and this actually pretty similar to iron age forges, like would be

  • used in the Middle Ages or by the Vikings.

  • So we're just going to warm the oil up a little bit.

  • A good way to check for critical temperature in these steels is by using a magnet.

  • In 1080 and steels like that, by the time it gets to critical temperature it will no

  • longer stick to a magnet.

  • So you can use that to confirm your temperature.

  • We want to check for any warping after we harden it.

  • This steel looks pretty straight, so I think we're good.

  • Alright, so I've just tempered the knife, and you can see it's got the entire thing

  • to kind of this straw color.

  • And I've just hit the back with a blowtorch, just to soften the spine of it a little bit.

  • Again, if you don't have a blowtorch this shouldn't be a problem.

  • So now I'm going to clean the knife up by giving it a good wire brush, and then putting

  • it in here with a bit of vinegar to dissolve the scale off of it.

  • Bit of vinegar, leave it for about an hour, should be cleaned up nicely.

  • I'm just going again with the 150 grit until we get a sharp edge on it, then I'll go to

  • 220 and probably 400.

  • I've rounded slightly the edge which is going to go on here.

  • Just because it will be hard to finish this area when it's clamped together.

  • It's just going to go together like that, and like that.

  • Knife sandwich.

  • Now we'll cut some pieces of brass rod for the pins in the handle.

  • Just measure measure it out right there like so.

  • And pro tip, if you have some acetone, it's useful just to- or even rubbing alcohol would

  • work- just de-grease and get all the dirt off of your knife and pieces of wood you're

  • using.

  • Just to make sure there's nothing getting in the way of the glue.

  • Okay, now we just mix this up.

  • This is it so far, and we'll just use a bit of linseed oil to finish the handle, seal

  • it from any moisture.

  • And now for a final step we'll just give it a quick sharpen on the sharpening stone.

  • Here's our knife, more or less completed.

  • Walnut handle, brass pins, and 1080 steel.

  • As you can see, it's very sharp.

  • Very sharp.

  • So, now we need to make a sheath for it.

  • What we'll also want to do is make a welt, which is a piece that goes inside the seam

  • here.

  • So that when we put our knife in it doesn't cut into the stitching, it cuts into the leather

  • welt.

  • I'll just trace the edge.

  • A

  • trick you can use for marking out where you want the stitching to go is to use a fork,

  • because we know the tines of the fork are pretty evenly spaced, so we can use the fork

  • to mark out on the edge where we want the stitching to be.

  • Alright, so we're just going to drill the holes for our stitching.

  • You can use an awl if you want to, to just poke the holes through, but I like to use

  • a 1/16 inch drill bit.

  • And just drill through...

  • So you can do it by hand just like that, drilling the welt, but if you have super glue I would

  • recommend gluing them together so they're not slipping around as you try to work with

  • it.

  • That will make it a bit easier to drill the holes, and you could do this before you drill

  • all of these holes if you want to.

  • That might have been a good idea.

  • So we'll need a belt loop on the sheath, and normally what I would do is make the knife

  • sheath like this with a belt loop as part of the leather and simply fold it over and

  • stitch it onto the back.

  • But with the piece of leather I used for this it was too small so I couldn't do that.

  • So I've cut out another piece of leather and I will just stitch it here and there, like

  • that.

  • So I have this part stitched on and now I'm just going to fold it over and make the stitching

  • again, right here.

  • Same process as before, use the fork just to mark out the holes, drill it, and stitch

  • it.

  • I'll go over how to stitch in just a minute when I'm stitching up this part.

  • Also important tip, stitch this part before you stitch this part, and stitch the belt

  • loop before you stitch this.

  • You'll never get the needles through here for the stitching.

  • You'll also have a hard time stitching this if you've already done this.

  • So, be careful of the order in which you do things.

  • Okay, so now I'll explain how I'm stitching it in a little more detail.

  • So firstly the needles we'll want to use, you'll want some pretty thick needles.

  • And secondly the thread you'll want to use, this is some waxed, I believe linen, thread.

  • This isn't the thread you use for stitching up your clothes, you want some pretty fat

  • thread.

  • And you'll also want to wax it.

  • So if you have some wax, just lubricate the thread and make it a bit stiffer.

  • Although the thread does come pre waxed in this case.

  • We want to measure out three, I don't know, four times the length, and a bit extra...

  • And use two needles, one on each end.

  • And then what you'll want to do is go through the first one.

  • Then put both needles through the second stitch.

  • Through like this, and then the first one through this hole.

  • Then tighten, and continue in that fashion all the way down the sheath.

  • This is called a saddle stitch.

  • Now that we've stitched all the way until the end, it stops the stitches from coming

  • apart if you back stitch one or two so we'll take this and put it through the next one

  • back.

  • Now we can just cut off the stitching, and there we go.