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  • On this episode of China Uncensored,

  • Taiwan's new president needs to lean in.

  • Welcome to China Uncensored, I'm your host Chris Chappell.

  • Two weeks ago,

  • Taiwan's first female president, Tsai Ing-wen,

  • was sworn into office.

  • And despite the fact that Tsai

  • promised to maintain the status quo between China and Taiwan,

  • her inauguration speech did not explicitly endorse the "one China" policy.

  • That's the agreement where both China and Taiwan agree

  • that they both belong to the same China,

  • while being intentionally vague about which China each one is talking about.

  • So Chinese officials threatened to stop communication with Taiwan

  • unless Tsai publicly acknowledges that there is only one China.

  • And then last week,

  • criticism of Tsai took a more personal turn.

  • State-run Xinhua News published a commentary that accused Tsai

  • of being emotional, extremist, and erratic because she's single.

  • This completely levelheaded and non-emotional article

  • was written by Wang Weixing,

  • a PLA officer and member of

  • the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits,

  • the semi-government body that deals with Taiwan.

  • And his article got so controversial that the propaganda department

  • ordered for it to be deleted.

  • But thanks to webcache,

  • it will live on the internet forever.

  • Like that embarrassing photo of me from college.

  • Here to talk about cross-straits relations and extreme emotional reactions,

  • here’s the only woman on the China Uncensored team, Shelley Zhang.

  • Thanks Chris.

  • What are you doing?

  • Finding balance, Chris.

  • It's what I do, as a woman.

  • It's in my yoga.

  • It's in my work-slash-life.

  • It's even in my tea.

  • So you're not surprised that Wang Weixing accused Tsai Ing-wen of being unbalanced?

  • It's hardly the first time an unmarried female leader has been through this.

  • Look at South Korean president Park Geun-hye.

  • Or former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard.

  • Frankly, I think Wang is probably the kind of guy

  • who would find any woman who became the leader of a country unbalanced,

  • even this woman:

  • That's pretty good.

  • I wonder if I could learn to do that.

  • No.

  • Anyway, do you think the Xinhua article

  • revealed a difference in sexism across the two straits?

  • In a way, yes.

  • If the All-China's Women's Federation

  • considers educated 27-year-olds "leftover women",

  • then 59-year-old Tsai,

  • who has a master's degree from Cornell,

  • and a PhD from the London School of Economics,

  • is the moldy lasagna in the back of my fridge that I'm afraid to look at.

  • Also, Taiwan has a much higher portion of women politicians than mainland China,

  • almost double the percentage in their legislature.

  • But all this is ultimately a distraction.

  • How so?

  • The Party doesn't really care about Tsai being an unmarried woman.

  • What they're really worried about is how she keeps using the "c" word

  • when talking about Taiwan.

  • Which "c" word is that?

  • Country,” Chris.

  • Tsai called Taiwan a country several times during her inauguration speech.

  • The same speech where she didn't refer to China and Taiwan as "one China."

  • Yep.

  • And Party officials are getting worried that their plan to subtly retake Taiwan

  • with economic incentives and promises of autonomy

  • aren't looking so good lately.

  • Yeah, especially since Hong Kong is turning out

  • to not be the shining example ofone country, two systems

  • that they were hoping would convince Taiwan.

  • So that's why Wang called Tsai erratic.

  • Classic distraction.

  • Look at that craaaazy woman,

  • taking out her repressed need to have a family by calling Taiwan a country.

  • And, in a way, I don't blame Wang for his article, Chris.

  • You see, mainland Chinese of his generation

  • grew up being told that China and Taiwan weren't really separated.

  • They were just, on a break.

  • They were both still part of one big, happy China.

  • And people like Wang hoped that someday,

  • Taiwan and China were going to get back together.

  • It was looking up, for a while there.

  • Closer economic ties.

  • Increasing tourism.

  • Their leaders met in person for the first time ever.

  • But now, it's looking like that break might have been a break up after all.

  • Thanks Shelley...

  • for opening the wounds of divorced families everywhere.

  • And thank you for watching China Uncensored.

  • Leave your comments below.

  • And if you liked this episode,

  • please support China Uncensored on Patreon.

  • Once again, I'm Chris Chappell. See you next time.

On this episode of China Uncensored,

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臺灣總統 "不平衡 "只因她是女人|中國無刪減網 (Taiwan’s President “Unbalanced” Because She’s a Woman | China Uncensored)

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    Pedroli Li 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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