Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • RETO MEIER: All right.

  • Good afternoon, everyone.

  • Welcome to this year's Android Fireside Chat.

  • My name is Reto Meier.

  • I'm part of the developer relations team at Google

  • and I'm joined by some of the most important people

  • on the Android Engineering, Design and Product teams.

  • The purpose of the fireside chat is basically

  • to let you guys ask questions from these people, all

  • of the stuff that you want to know about Android,

  • where it is, what we've announced today,

  • how things have been done, how some of those decisions

  • have been made, all of those sorts of things.

  • So it is a Q&A session.

  • We have mics at the front and middle of the room.

  • If you have a question, please line up, ask.

  • If there are no questions, it'll be a really short session.

  • We do have a few from online which

  • we've collected in the weeks leading up.

  • So I'm going to ask some of those as well.

  • While you guys are getting ready to ask questions yourself,

  • I'll ask the panel to introduce themselves,

  • just who you are and a little bit

  • about what you do at Google.

  • Maybe start with you, Gabe.

  • GABE COHEN: I'm Gabe Cohen.

  • I'm a product manager on the Android OS.

  • I also work on Google Play services

  • and a few other things.

  • XAVIER DUCROHET: Hello, I'm Xavier Ducrohet.

  • I'm the lead for the Developer Tool and the SDK.

  • ADAM POWELL: I am Adam Powell I'm

  • a framework engineer on the UI Toolkit.

  • RACHEL GARB: Hi.

  • I'm Rachel Garb and I'm an interaction designer

  • on the Android OS.

  • JHILMIL JAIN: Hi.

  • My name is Jhilmil Jain and I lead user research for Android.

  • CHET HAUSE: I'm Chet Hause.

  • I'm an engineer on the UI Toolkit team.

  • DIANNE HACKBORN: I am Dianne Hackborn.

  • I'm an engineer on the Android Core Framework team.

  • DAVE BURKE: Dave Burke.

  • Engineering Director.

  • I work on the Platform and Nexus devices.

  • FICUS KIRKPATRICK: I'm Kirkpatrick.

  • I work on the Play Store apps and games and hardware.

  • MILES BAR: I'm Miles Bar, I'm the engineering manager

  • for the apps part of Google Play.

  • RETO MEIER: Thanks everyone.

  • All right.

  • Let's get started.

  • We've got a line at the back.

  • So, why don't we start with you, sir.

  • AUDIENCE: My question is about Java 8.

  • Will it be coming to Android?

  • And if so, when?

  • And will it be supported on all the versions as well?

  • RETO MEIER: It's like a hot potato question.

  • Oh, the mic's going to Xav.

  • CHET HAUSE: Usually any question that has the word will in it,

  • you might want to think about it.

  • Because I'm not sure the answer is going to be what you want.

  • In general, can we say the general policy, which is,

  • we don't really talk about stuff that we will do in the future.

  • Just so you know.

  • Let's just lay the groundwork out there.

  • Xav, go.

  • RETO MEIER: Now, answer the question,

  • Xav, What will happen and when?

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • XAVIER DUCROHET: I have no comment.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • RETO MEIER: Perfect.

  • All right.

  • Now you can all see me as well.

  • All right.

  • Let's try another question.

  • Hopefully one which we can actually answer.

  • AUDIENCE: Hi.

  • This is for Dianne.

  • First off, I really appreciate all

  • of the work you've done on Binder.

  • And I know that it sits at the heart of everything that

  • is Android at all.

  • And I just wanted to ask you, you've

  • been involved in Binder development

  • even before Android was Android.

  • Can you talk a little bit about the history of Binder

  • and your work with it?

  • DIANNE HACKBORN: OK.

  • Well, thank you.

  • Oh, well I, So Binder started out in BOS

  • and has been something that I was--

  • I was not main person who did Binder.

  • I worked on it as an engineer at BE, then at Palm Source.

  • And then we kind of adopted it just for IPC in Android.

  • But actually, I don't even think it's the core of Android.

  • It's a convenient way to do IPC on the Android.

  • Previous versions of the Binder were actually much more core

  • to the platform design.

  • So today it's a really nice way to do capability based IPC.

  • RETO MEIER: Fair enough.

  • Thank you.

  • All right, I'm going to ask one of the questions we received

  • online earlier.

  • I think material design is one of the most interesting things

  • that I saw come out of the keynote today.

  • So I was wondering, what sort of research

  • did we do to be able to come up with some of those ideas?

  • JHILMIL JAIN: Thanks.

  • I think for the first time at Google,

  • the researchers came together across the company

  • to work on medieval design.

  • So we had researchers from 15 different groups

  • and four different Google offices come together

  • to do research.

  • And we conducted research on four main areas.

  • The first was components, which is containers and elements,

  • patterns and layouts, which is like the floating action

  • button, motion and accessibility.

  • So some examples of the types of research

  • that we did, was first, we explored and validated

  • key design principles, such as really figuring out

  • the motion curve and speed.

  • Second was that we highlighted key usability issues

  • that designers should be mindful of.

  • For example, when picking the color of the floating action

  • button, making sure that it doesn't

  • blend into the background like it was in some mocks

  • that we exploded earlier.

  • Or making sure that the fabs, the size of the fab

  • wasn't, or floating action button

  • wasn't like varying within the app

  • because that would confuse users.

  • And third is that we conducted a whole bunch

  • of accessibility studies that led

  • to a number of design changes.

  • And one such design change is that we

  • have now a much improved color palette, which

  • takes into account the color contrast that

  • is required between type and the background.

  • So now our low, vision impaired users

  • can actually read the text a lot better.

  • DAVE BURKE: If you're wondering what a floating action

  • button is, because I didn't know what it was until a week ago,

  • it's actually an image view.

  • It's where someone's called set elevation on the view.

  • Just thought you should know.

  • But it looks cool.

  • And it's round.

  • Does it have to be round?

  • So the dialer one's the floating action button.

  • We need a translation between you and engineering.

  • RETO MEIER: Question for Xav, I think.

  • I will quote it out to you.

  • Considering its performance, why not offer Genymotion

  • as the official emulator for Android?

  • [LAUGHTER AND CHEERS]

  • XAVIER DUCROHET: It's a good question.

  • First of all, I think it's a great product.

  • I think they are not quite free, though.

  • So there is a demo version.

  • I don't know exactly what the demo is.

  • But I think that's what I sense, that you

  • have to pay for to get some things.

  • So we can't quite distribute that.

  • The other thing is that, obviously, we

  • need to improve a lot, the story there.

  • We have, one other thing that we really want to do

  • is a low eliminating already, all the ecosystem.

  • And that means also AUM and MEEPS.

  • And they go mostly with x86 for performance reasons

  • which totally makes sense.

  • But we have to sleep on that.

  • And we do want to support a lot more hardware in the long term,

  • like Bluetooth, multi-touch, and things like that.

  • And it's a lot better, if we control

  • the own stack, the whole stack for that.

  • And so we want to keep all technology to do that.

  • But it's a great product.

  • You should definitely try it out and use it

  • if it fits your needs.

  • RETO MEIER: Thanks.

  • Let's take another question from the crowd, at the back.

  • AUDIENCE: Sure.

  • Just curious in Android L, what's

  • new with adaptive bit rate video and HLS support?

  • DAVE BURKE: OK.

  • So, let's see.

  • The most interesting thing we're doing.

  • And I'm not sure if it's launched yet

  • but it's imminent is, we're going

  • to open source something we call XO Player.

  • This is the player that's in YouTube and in Play Movies

  • and TV.

  • And it's built on MediaCodec, MediaDRM, and MediaExtractor,

  • MediaCrypto.

  • It's a really good adaptive bit rate player.

  • It uses Dash.

  • So that's one thing to know.

  • And then I'm pretty sure we've updated to the latest internet

  • draft of HLS in L. And that's all

  • I can remember that we've done so far.

  • AUDIENCE: Thank you.

  • RETO MEIER: From the front.

  • AUDIENCE: Hello.

  • I've seen the new UI and UX you have

  • prepared for the L release.

  • I was wondering, I've seen that in the action bar, where

  • we used to have the up navigation affordments, now

  • we have what looks like a back button.

  • What's going on there?

  • Is it changing?

  • Are we giving up on the app navigation?

  • So what's going to happen?

  • ADAM POWELL: So the short answer is that structurally nothing

  • is changing in that navigation.

  • Some of the stuff that was shown,

  • I think during the keynote, there

  • was a demo of multiple Chrome tabs opening

  • in different documents within recents as well.

  • So some of that is going to subtly change just

  • as a result of that new feature.

  • In terms of the iconography, unfortunately I

  • don't think we have a representative

  • from our visual design team here,

  • but Rachel do you want to talk to that?

  • RACHEL GARB: Yeah, I believe it's just that an arrow really

  • clearly says for most people, this is what I wanted to do.

  • want do what I was doing before.

  • Whether it's hierarchical or historical.

  • AUDIENCE: Don't we have the back button for that?

  • ADAM POWELL: There is.

  • And what, Go ahead Feel free.

  • So what we found is that, and again, even just

  • in terms of some of the research that we've done with this,

  • users tend to really think either in terms

  • of the system or the app at a given point in time.

  • And having that extra affordance be sitting there

  • in the app, very clearly in the app in the bar,

  • is something that they much more closely tie to,

  • I'm going to continue acting within the context of this app.

  • Whereas the Back button in the system

  • is really seen as more of kind of meta action

  • that can act between apps.

  • Even though a lot of users aren't

  • able to clearly articulate the difference between these two,

  • and even though the iconography is very similar, what we found

  • is a lot of users tend to develop this really intuitive

  • understanding of what to expect when they press either one.

  • Now, of course for developers, this is really interesting

  • because it means that there's a lot of subtlety to really get

  • this right.

  • And we're really hoping that some of the new functionality

  • that we've exposed to open documents in more recents tabs

  • will really help iron out some of the rougher cases that