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  • not much changes on the stroke of 11 in any practical sense, but Britain could no longer go into council.

  • Meetings at ministerial level prime ministerial level in the U Seats in the European Parliament have been withdrawn from us.

  • At that moment on Monday, something interesting starts happening in terms of defining the future relationship.

  • The prime minister here is gonna give a a speech on the U is going to unveil some of its plans for how it sees those negotiations.

  • The prime minister, I understand very much, sees the future relationship with the you as the sort of trade relationship that Canada has, and that is pretty pissed at the distant end of the scale.

  • In terms of expectations and where they were not so many months ago, when Theresa May was in number 10 he sinks.

  • Therefore, if he's going for that kind of deal, the only restrictions the you can put on Britain a pretty light ones, the sort of ones that they put on Canada that you expect is gonna come back and say, Who are you kidding?

  • Thing's gonna be pretty subdued here tonight with a light show which doesn't look like it's gonna be that extravagant and some drinks in side here.

  • This is how the day was marked around London way two sides were back one last time.

  • I've already seen some people dressed in very garish union jacks that make me feel quite shivering.

  • Battle is done with divisions remain.

  • I'm gonna very right and you gonna wear.

  • Have you split the country into other Brexit Prime minister?

  • Prime Minister, You could lean in a little bit of a symbolic cabinet meeting in Sunderland where leave triumphed where Brexit swung Labour votes to Tory's last month.

  • On Monday, in a speech, the prime minister will say he wants a trade deal like Canada has with you openly acknowledging the first time that approach means expensive delays as products up check to the border to the U.

  • The government estimates on the consensus amongst economists that will hurt areas like the Northeast.

  • I think for many people that voted in Brexit, I don't think money even came into their minds to be of the way elections were run people.

  • You put up a program and voted depending on how it will make them and their family better off.

  • But this was different.

  • This was different.

  • And these voters in your calls might even take a hit and be okay with that.

  • If it came to that, if it came to it, they would Oh yes, if it came to it, many of them in Brussels, Some of his parties MBPs were milking the moment as they left the European Parliament for the last time.

  • The U.

  • K's you office lowered its you flank.

  • Its staff numbers now go up with the extra pressures of being outside the U Club.

  • That club today put on a show of chin up unity.

  • As the sun rises tomorrow, a new chapter for our union off 27 will start.

  • Why have any other countries followed us?

  • Truth is this very temple to them because what it did three years ago, three years ago we had.

  • So we had Salvi in Italy and others talking about leaving the euro et cetera.

  • And then they watched what happened here.

  • They don't know that there's a contagion.

  • They watch the total utter Hall IX the British government made of Brexit because of that, because of that, they part of withdrawal of it from their positions.

  • What I do know it's not that they watch what happens when you negotiate and how that you gets the upper hand it out, use a bigger force than an individual country.

  • He was enormously powerful, hugely powerful things guys.

  • But that's why there hasn't been contagion, isn't it?

  • That's why people aren't following us out the door.

  • This is the beginning of the end of the European Project.

  • As I've said Thio, fellow Socialist Party leaders all across Europe, the conditions that led to the no vote in Britain also exist in France exist in Germany.

  • They exist in the Czech Republic, Italy and Spain.

  • Don't run away with the idea that the anger in Britain about the way the establishment treated them isn't replicated all across Europe.

  • It sounds like you've got more sympathy there for the leave argument.

  • What I've got is sympathy for the way, way and why people voted in that referendum.

  • I campaigned all over the country in that referendum.

  • I know hard enough, some people say Well, people said that afterwards.

  • Nobody said that during the campaign, nobody said that at that time Whitehall was lit up this evening, day of the referendum, civil servants spoke of distress and despair.

  • Back then, nearly 3/4 of all MPs back to remain were one of the biggest economies in the world.

  • Six biggest economy in the world.

  • We could make a success of the choice that we make.

  • And I'm sure that's exactly what we will do.

  • And I wish the government well in all their endeavors to make sure that happens.

  • Ah, a couple of 100 pro remain demonstrators serenaded the use office in London Once it will be back, you officials look touched.

  • Not sooner sooner rather than later.

  • Some people who fought alongside you for leave try to reach out to remain.

  • Er's today on DDE not gloat and not bask in their victory.

  • Well, that's because they got a split party.

  • You're talking about the conservatives?

  • Look, come on.

  • You and I both know that sound like you're up for half the cabinet.

  • You won't be doing that reaching out, Karthik.

  • I will half the cabinet voting.

  • Give me a rehearsal of it Now you are watching out missing half the cabinet.

  • Very remained there.

  • Embarrassed for what's going on?

  • They you were gonna gloat Mode.

  • Give me your reach out.

  • This is Look, I tell you what, I'll quit.

  • The Financial Times This is now happening.

  • Let's join together and let's make the best of it.

  • And I would say to people who voted remain.

  • We are living in a functioning democracy that the war is over.

  • Horace Johnson must now shape a new relationship with Europe, making a reality of that word.

  • Brexit, which convulsed our politics, divided the nation.

  • And as of four hours time, his law well, we've now on would come from the Brexit party and Tony Blair's former director of communications, Alistair Campbell, on Whitcomb.

  • This is the happiest day of your life.

  • Well, it's certainly one of the happiest.

  • I feel very, very jubilant.

  • But I'm also conscious of the great relief because I think like an awful lot of other people that happy in time to have the last 3.5 years when I thought, Well, I wonder if this really is going to happen on today.

  • It's happened or is happening.

  • So Alistair Campbell, you sad or angry or well, I'm very sad.

  • I think that the country is taking a wrong turn.

  • I think we will live to regret it I think that the promises that were made or not being delivered and now we're entering the hard part.

  • Now look, I'm British and a patriot.

  • I really hope that the country does well in the future, but I really fear that we've chosen our own decline and it makes me sad and yes, angry as well.

  • Do you have any anxiety that he may be right on time?

  • Of course we'll tell.

  • But we're the world's fifth largest economy.

  • We can open up trade deals with the rest of the world.

  • We take control of our own borders, our in laws.

  • What does worry me is if Boris doesn't actually stick to the red lines that he says he has drawn.

  • Now we know Boris, come talk big.

  • The question is, will you also walk big?

  • So that already known it'll be his fault, Not yours.

  • Depends what goes wrong.

  • I'm worried about the next 12 months.

  • The negotiations.

  • Now, if he gives away too much like if he gives in to Wanda Lyons demand for regulator realignment for a level playing field, then it will be useful.

  • And I hope he doesn't do that.

  • But, Mr Campbell, you could also have made a historic mistake all these years, and it could be a roaring success.

  • Well, you can't.

  • You can.

  • You can worry about the future.

  • You can be confident by the future's an is.

  • But I think the fact that we're already talking about this, depending upon the trustworthiness of Boris Jobson underlines just how father is to go.

  • He won the election.

  • Okay, fair play.

  • He won the election.

  • The message was, get breaks it done.

  • Brexit has not bean done.

  • We're leaving European Union.

  • What that now actually means in practice, I think does give me cause for concern.

  • And I worry that for all the red, white and blue on Downing Street in the 50 p coins when you read the text of that is his peace, prosperity and friendship with all nations.

  • I worry that we've undermined all three of those by what we're doing today.

  • You're really gonna be handing those 50 p's back if you get them in the chill.

  • While I'm going to suggest that shops have a little charity box in every single shop that handles cash people.

  • But they do exactly and allow.

  • My 50 piece will go one of those boxes.

  • What?

  • What if you give one to me in case I don't think you got one yet?

  • No, I'm looking forward to it.

  • I mean, there there is a risk.

  • Here is no his historic gamble.

  • We're on our own.

  • What does that say about our place in the world?

  • I don't believe it's a gamble.

  • I believe it's carefully thought through decision, which is different from a gamble.

  • I think what it says about our place in the world is that we're free and independent on can do deals with the rest of the world.

  • And I'm particularly hopeful for Africa because actually you think of you as benign.

  • But it is a great big protectionist block on.

  • I'm hoping that we'll be able to do deals which will benefit from it is very little were doing what I just said that we can do now.

  • And I think that the we are turning our back on European Union.

  • I think you've seen in the graceful way that the Europeans have handled our exit, that actually I think people will see that that's where our friendships are.

  • I think relying on Trump is gonna be a big mistake, particularly right now.

  • You're already seeing the worries in that relationship.

  • So I think to to use a phrase I think we could have by staying.

  • We could have had our cake and eating it eating it, and that's what we were doing.

  • We have no control over their own affairs, and I spent seven years.

  • Alistair also spent is in government in a different way.

  • But I spent seven years in government actually seeing on an almost daily basis that we couldn't do anything that wasn't compatible with EU law, that if they gave us a directive that we didn't want, we nevertheless had to implement it.

  • I watched how helpless we were and that was one my views on the you really hardened until then, moderately ambivalent.

  • You've always style yourself as you know, something of radical, shaking things up a little part of you That sort of sniffs the air and things for freedom revolution.

  • If I felt that this was genuine freedom, if I thought that this was revolution But I do worry that is choosing decline now, as I say, if they make it work fine and great.

  • But I've seen very little coming out of the mouths of our politicians.

  • That actually suggested me.

  • They thought that through.

  • So listen, I hope it works.

  • I hope I'm wrong, but I don't think I will be everything I've heard coming from the man's of politicians.

  • At least the politicians were gonna be responsible for implementing it encourages May.

  • But my big concern is will they actually do it?

  • Will they stick to becoming a competitors on the EU's doorstep?

  • Or will we just have a level playing field, In which case we might as well, a lot of bother coming up?

  • Is this a revolutionary or a reaction?

  • Remove The end of the day I die.

  • Just believe is an entirely sensible move.

  • Is that conservative a conservative sensible is taking the country back?

  • Is taking the country power is something that we thought we had before, but actually it probably never existed insofar as when we talk about peace, prosperity and friendship of nations.

  • The European Union helped the U K Do that I mean first of all pieces kept by NATO, not by the U.

  • Secondly, prosperity.

  • With the world's fifth largest economy, we could be very prosperous in need and more prosperous.

  • S O.

  • I do believe that you would do so.

  • I believe there's a really, really chance opening up before us.

  • And I think we want to go in there and take it on.

  • Not just be afraid.

  • I think you're a bit timid, Alice.

  • I'm not gonna be very briefly.

  • Will you ever come to terms with this?

  • Yeah, course you don't.

  • You have to.

  • You know, it's just like when you know, when Margaret Thatcher get winning elections, you have to accept it.

  • So except it's happening.

  • But what it won't make me do is kind of eternal of six months and say that I didn't believe I don't believe today What I believe.

  • Yesterday we rejoin.

  • I don't know what I suspect.

  • A lot in my life, Absolutely.

  • But the next generation is not gonna have this.

  • The next generation next generation era will never go through this again.

  • We'll never get through this.

  • And we're talking to the next generation.

  • Later pregnant Alistair Campbell am would completely, very much for joining Sporting.

  • Welcome back to Berlin and the Brandenburg.

  • Now, here's just a small sample off the German newspapers this morning on Devil got Brexit on the front page goodbye, and good luck is for by its all over says another one on da goodbye.

  • So long, says 1/3.

  • Most of the German newspapers are dealing with this issue, and they all have a similar tone.

  • It is regret rather than good riddance.

  • The German chancellor, Angela Merkel, called Brexit a significant blow to US old but promised her country would want it to stay.

  • Is Britain's partner and friend.

  • Meanwhile, President Macron Frantz called Brexit a shock which would send historic alarm signals across Europe.

  • You know the power of Nexus works, you raisins averted.

  • Senator.

  • Your power plants from a hole, Miss Vivian, come Vienna complained.

  • The dummy says I defect the most orange digs Asia.

  • Assume the simplification.

  • Hume.

  • The shake on a comic.

  • You know me it full.

  • Always see ash.

  • I can start a souvenir.

  • The circle of Muslims.

  • Prick.

  • Andrea Don't know democracy.

  • A very punch.

  • You turn there from President Macron Pap, setting the tone for future negotiations.

  • Now, although the big issues like trade and immigration, will dominate the next three months in Germany itself, there really has been more sadness than recrimination.

  • Germans have long appreciated Britain's role in the you, despite some well documented differences along the way.

  • Berlin is a city of scars, mostly self inflicted, many left for show and tell.

  • Like these bullet holes from the last days of the Second World War.

  • This place is a layer cake of uncomfortable history on the ability to move on.

  • Brexit is a new beginning, and Britain is about to reinvent itself.

  • And let's face it, no city knows more about reinvention.

  • Then Berlin take this hideous piece of architecture.

  • For example, when the Berlin Wall fell 30 years ago, there was jubilation across Europe.

  • The Cold War had ended without a single shot being fired.

  • But oddly enough, the fall of this wall also in some ways paved the way for Brexit because it allowed Germany to become united.

  • Germany was now a colossus of almost 90 million people inside the European Union and for many eurosceptics in Britain.

  • That was simply unacceptable.

  • Brexit wise, someone has scrawled on the wall Brexit to has left a small scar, an emotional one, and it's Hunt's heading Horseman's mission to make it heal.

  • It couldn't believe, and that the Brits what abandon ship when we were all in rough waters.

  • But the European Union, yes, but there are a lot of Brits who also voted for Brexit because they just don't like a dominant Germany in Europe, they don't really like the Germans very much.

  • That's the task off mine cessation off the German British society to build that personal trust.

  • And do you think that is not more important than it was before while we were members of the European Union?

  • Much more, much more.

  • But can all that good will survive the bruising months of trade talks to come?

  • Can they?

  • Rachel and Tammy, both married to Germans, both called this place hope I muted because I wanted to exercise my freedom of movement on, you know, when I was expecting to get married and my husband's German, and now it feels like there's this'll barrier now to go back to the UK What are the main challenges for the two of you?

  • Especially being married to right of return is solely within the gift off the UK government.