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  • Hey everyone!

  • We've reached the land of 1/8 of my own heritage, Ireland,

  • which means I'm probably a far-off distant cousin of our favorite Irishman:

  • PEADAR!!!

  • For those who don't know,

  • PEADAR has helped us out with many of the animations in the past

  • and PEADAR been such a great guy

  • so we decided to fly PEADAR out here

  • to literally be in PEADAR'S own country's video.

  • PEADAR, you rock man!

  • Peadar: It's pronounced ''Padder''!

  • (Uhhh... what?)

  • [intro]

  • Barby: Ehh too late, I've been calling you Potter for like two years now.

  • I'm not changing my mind.

  • Anyway, we've reached Ireland!

  • Peadar: And I'm here to correct him if he gets on anything wrong. So don't worry lads.

  • Barby: Yeah, that is so true Potter.

  • [Peadar punches Barby]

  • Peadar: Ah so that's how that feels like.

  • POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY

  • Ahh the Emerald Isle, Europe's rain shield, the McNugget.

  • Ireland is loaded with so many notable spots and regions

  • Barby: Hehe, and there's a town called ''Dingle''.

  • First of all, Ireland is the third largest island in Europe located in the North Atlantic Ocean

  • separated from Great Britain by the North Channel, the Irish Sea and St. George's Channel

  • Barby: Ehehehaha, did you notice how I deliberately avoided British Isles?

  • Peadar: Yeah. Good call.

  • Barby: Now here is where things get a little confusing... Ireland's subdivisions...

  • Let's just get it over with quick and fast.

  • Peader: So when discussing the independent sovereign state,

  • most people are referring to the Republic of Ireland which makes up these 5/6 of the island and, unless mentioned otherwise,

  • this is the Ireland will be mostly discussing in this episode.

  • Barby: To this day, the last fifth Northern part of Ireland here is actually part of the UK

  • and it doesn't even quite know exactly what to label itself.

  • Some call it a province,

  • some say it's a region,

  • some say it's a constituent country,

  • but the point is, UK holds on to it.

  • Peadar: Which as you can imagine has created some interesting feelings in the past with the Irish.

  • Barby: It's weird though because the people here can choose their own citizenship:

  • be a British, Irish or both.

  • On the west side, the North Ireland border just juts into the farmlands ending at a small village called Manger

  • and provides a 7 kilometer wide quarter to the town of Bundoran

  • for the rest of the Republic to enter into Donegal County.

  • Peader: And then you have the strange pene-enclave, right across the Fin River

  • with only a tenth of a kilometer wide entrance,

  • the Ireland Grahdens is still part of Monaghan County.

  • This in return gave a small exclave to the UK, an unnamed patch of land with only three small farming homes.

  • Barby: The only way to get in besides swimming across the river would be by taking the most name switched International Road on the island,

  • the Irish N54

  • which turns into the A3 highway once you cross into Northern Ireland,

  • then it switches back into the N54 once you cross into the exclave

  • and it reverted back to the A3 again for about two kilometers

  • and then back to the N54 once you cross back into the Republic of Ireland.

  • So literally it's like Irish, British, Irish, British, Irish!

  • Peadar: Or as I like to call it...my dating life!

  • Also, the UK was like: ''Argh, instead of following the Foyle river all the way up to the Foyle lock,

  • why don't we just swerve left through the Farmland to take the entire city of Derry

  • because hey...

  • LOGIC!

  • Basically to an Irish person, the entire island of Ireland, including Northern Ireland is just...

  • IRELAND!

  • Barby: So if you consider the administrative divisions,

  • the Republic of Ireland is divided into 26 counties,

  • however, many also include the extra 6 from Northern Ireland and call it 32,

  • but then there's the two city and county councils, Limerick and Waterford,

  • and the three city councils: Dublin, Galway and Cork,

  • making 31 local authorities in the Republic of Ireland

  • and technically 37 again if you include Northern Ireland's counties

  • and the capital of Dublin.

  • Peader: Says, is that right?

  • Barby: OK, yeah, you know. I got that right, whoo!

  • Peadar: Historically though, Ireland was also kind of split into four provinces that many people still refer to today.

  • They are Connacht, Leinster, Munster and Ulster.

  • Northern Ireland is often referred to as Ulster as it encompasses most of the counties that make up the historical province.

  • Otherwise, the largest cities after Dublin are Cork and Limerick

  • with the largest airports being Dublin, Cork and Shannon airports.

  • Keep in mind, if Northern Ireland was included in this, Belfast would take the number two spots on each of those lists.

  • Peadar: In addition to being an island itself, Ireland also hosts hundreds of smaller little islands and islets.

  • The most populated one being Great island by Cork, Achill Island in Mayo and Gorumna and the Aran islands in Galway.

  • Barby: Finally some places of interest across Ireland might include places like:

  • Trinity College,

  • the Guinness storehouse,

  • the Neolithic tomb of Newgrange which is older than the pyramids of Giza

  • Rock of Cashel,

  • Glendalough in Wicklow,

  • Blarney Stone of Cork,

  • Peadar: That island that was filmed up the end of Star Wars. It's called Skellig Michael,

  • Tory Island which kinda has like its own king,

  • Scotia's grave, where an Egyptian princess is buried supposedly

  • I didn't know about that one.

  • Barby: You didn't even know that. Wow!

  • I just found it off of Atlas Obscura.

  • The Mound of Hostages,

  • the Ceide Fields,

  • the Sky Garden,

  • the Hook Head lighthouse, the oldest continuously used lighthouse still operating in Europe.

  • Barby: You live right next to it?

  • Peadar: Yeah!

  • Barby: Sean's bar, the oldest surviving pub and possibly in the entire world.

  • Peadar: And of course way too many churches, abbeys, castles, dolmens, tombs, everything else to list.

  • Barby: Way too many of them.

  • Peadar: Way too many.

  • Barby: Oh, and avoid Temple Bar, right, in Dublin?

  • That's like a tourist trap and you can't actually meet any real Irish people there, it's...

  • just don't go there,

  • don't go to Temple Bar.

  • Peadar: Yeah, give it a miss. Go to Coppers

  • Barby: Coppers.

  • Ahhh beer! You guys know your way around the pint. Don't you?

  • Peadar: Oh, well Irish people do, but I don't actually drink...

  • Barby: No? Ok.

  • Peadar: ...after that man I killed.

  • Barby: Oh, yeah... wait, wha...?

  • PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

  • Ireland is very green.

  • THE END!

  • Peader: Alright, so there's a little bit more to it than that.

  • Ireland is a post-glacial carved mineral and sandstone island with about 12 small mountain ranges,

  • the majority of which are located in the north, west and south.

  • Peadar: You'll notice looking at the map that the east coast Ireland seems to be relatively smooth and straight

  • whereas the west coast of Ireland seems to be all choppy and surrounded with inlets and peninsulas.

  • Almost like if you took a ball of clay

  • and just spread it across a flat surface in one direction.

  • Barby: Hehe, One Direction...

  • Anyway the tallest peak is Mount Carrauntoohil, at about a thousand meters

  • Barby: and the longest and most important river being the river Shannon

  • Peader: and the largest large lake on the entire island being Loch Neagh in Northern Ireland,

  • However, if we're talking about the Republic of Ireland, the largest would be Loch Corrib in West Galway.

  • Barby: The west side is also home to the most notable natural landmark, the cliffs of Moher that rise about 120 meters straight up from the ocean

  • Peadar: Otherwise, you have the Slieve league cliffs, a bit further up north and in the UK's Northern Ireland, used to-

  • You have the Giant's Causeway, a series of hexagonal volcanic plug steps that just jot into the ocean side.

  • Barby: I love how you say that, Hexagonal.

  • Peader: Hexagonal.

  • Barby: Hexagonal, hexagonal.

  • Now despite being located fairly north in latitude,

  • Ireland actually experiences a strange weather phenomenon

  • in which it actually kind of acts like a rain shield for the UK.

  • It takes all the warm air released by the North Atlantic Gulf stream that starts all the way from the Caribbean.

  • This means that although Ireland is on the same relative latitude as Newfoundland, Canada,

  • they remain about 9 degree Celsius or about 17 degrees Fahrenheit warmer

  • rarely reaching the freezing point, which in return means they hardly ever get snow.

  • However that again in return, means Ireland gets a ton of rain.

  • Like seriously, over half the year is drenched,

  • you only get like two months of sunshine, and then it's back to the downpour.

  • I mean wouldn't that make you guys like kind of depressed?

  • Peadar: What do you think? Drinking is a thing in Ireland.

  • Speaking of which, the abundance of rain allows Ireland to actually flourish in flora and agriculture

  • giving it its trademark green colour.

  • Common crops being spuds (potatoes), sugar beets and grains like Barley oats and wheat

  • which as you can imagine has a large portion that goes for the most famous product beer,

  • BEER!!!

  • Barby: Ireland without beer is like Mexico without Tacos, Koreas without Kimchi

  • Argentinians without -salsa- (correction: tango),

  • Bob Saget without his telekinetic laser vision.

  • Peader: Yeah, beer culture is such an integral part of being Irish that even

  • priests and nuns get in on the action and share with a guest.

  • Barby: Which by the way, the Bible never condemns alcohol, just drunkenness.

  • So, know your limits.

  • Peader: Yeah, we go to confessional a lot.

  • Peader: Otherwise some top notable Irish dishes might include things like:

  • Boxty,

  • potato bread,

  • brown soda bread,

  • bacon and cabbage

  • too many soups to list like coddle and Irish stew,

  • black pudding

  • Oysters and Guinness

  • and overall you can find potatoes cooked in various ways would like everything.

  • Barby: In addition, Ireland is also the perfect habitat for about twenty six species of mammals like

  • the red fox,

  • European hedgehog,

  • the stoat,

  • Pygmy shrew

  • and badger

  • and the one land reptile that is native to the country: the viviparous lizard.

  • Peader: Speaking of which, no. The set story of St. Patrick driving all the snakes out of Ireland was probably not true.

  • Ireland most likely never had snakes due to its geographic isolation from the rest of Europe

  • and also St. Patrick probably wasn't Irish, he was Welsh.

  • Barby: Yeah, lots of misconceptions when it comes to Irish people,

  • Which brings us to:

  • DEMOGRAPHICS

  • Barby: Hey, so Potter, I-

  • [Peadar punches Barby]

  • Sorry, Peadar! So what does it mean to be Irish?

  • Peader: Oh, we're all about the craic in Ireland, so we are.

  • Barby: Yeah... cra- "craic?"

  • Peader: Craic every day and night of the week. We love the craic so and...

  • Police officer: DEA! FREEZE! Hands where I can see 'em!

  • Peader: Common misconception - see, we're not actually talking about drugs. We're talking...

  • Police officer: RESISTING ARREST!

  • Peader: DOOGH!!

  • Barby: First of all, Ireland has about 4.8 million people, over 6 million if you include Northern Ireland

  • and has the highest birth rate in the EU.

  • About 83% of the country identifies as ethnically Irish,

  • whereas about 9.5% are white of other nationalities,

  • whereas the remainder of the country is other groups like Asians, Blacks

  • and who knows, probably some magical wizards or something.

  • Peadar: So the country uses the Euro as their current currency,

  • they also use the type G plug outlet

  • and they drive on the left side of the road.

  • Barby: Now thanks to modern media, everyone probably has at least a little bit of exposure to the stereotypical Irish culture, one way or another.

  • You know like Riverdance or leprechauns or

  • river dancing leprechauns...

  • But there's an entire world to the deep-rooted Irish identity

  • First of all, the language.

  • Peadar: Technically Ireland or at least the "Republic of Ireland" is a bilingual country

  • that uses both Irish and English

  • although English is used far more often than Irish ever is.

  • The Irish language is related to other Celtic-based languages

  • spoken in Scotland, Wales

  • and to so extent, Brittany in France.

  • Barby: Just when you thought you were safe after the Iceland episode,

  • Irish comes along and suddenly, 'M' and 'H' make a 'V' sound.

  • ' D' and 'H' make a 'G' or 'Y' sound,

  • 'B', 'H' and 'F' sometimes make like a ''woo'' sound.

  • Peadar: Alright Paul, let's say you take a shot at saying these words.

  • Barby: All right!

  • [Barby is trying to pronounce the Irish words]

  • Peader: Nope, Ar Aghaidh Leat, it means ''Go on''

  • [Barby tries again]

  • Peader: Nice try. It's Tabhachtach, it means ''important''

  • [Third try]

  • Peader: No! Leithris. It means ''toilet''.

  • [Fourth try]

  • Peader: Actually that was just one I made up.

  • But I strike!

  • Barby: For a long time, the language was suppressed and discouraged by the English-speaking rulers

  • to the point where a couple of generations were greatly affected and grew up barely knowing their own native tongue.

  • Peadar: Today the language has seen a huge resurgence and is one of the core subjects in most primary and secondary schools.

  • Although less than half the population claims to be fluent in Irish,

  • there are only a few communities that actually speak it regularly in daily life.

  • The Irish language is still survives into the 21st century.

  • Barby: All the public signs are posted in both languages

  • They even have an Irish-speaking TV channel, radio station and even an online newspaper.

  • In order to get a real feel of Ireland though,

  • you kind of have to know a little bit of history, which will take way too long to explain,

  • but in the quickest way we can put it:

  • Stone Age,

  • Celtic culture comes in,

  • Chiefdoms,

  • High Kings,