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  • Welcome to the show.

  • What's going on, man?

  • This is, uh, one of my favorite moments in life.

  • -Ooh! -Having you on the show because--

  • you know why-- because I grew up watching you

  • and your cast on In Living Color

  • as one of the funniest group of human beings ever assembled.

  • (cheering and applause)

  • You know...

  • That's not a compliment

  • 'cause you said, "I was a little baby."

  • -I didn't say that. I said I grew up. -"I was a child."

  • I said I grew up. Why are you putting words in my mouth?

  • -I did not say that. -"I was a toddler watching you,

  • -a middle to late-middle-aged negro." -I didn't say that.

  • (laughter)

  • "At the end of your career,

  • still peddling those stereotypic jokes."

  • -I did not say that. -No, thank you.

  • Well, I-I changed it a little bit,

  • -but thank you. -Just a little. Just a little bit. Editorial.

  • Um, no, but congratulations.

  • -Yep. -This year is gonna be 30 years...

  • The 30-year anniversary of In Living Color,

  • -which, for many people... -Yes. Yes.

  • (cheering and applause)

  • Which, for many people, reshaped the ideas

  • of, like, what sketch comedy could be,

  • how a joke could be told.

  • Some people feel like it was almost, like,

  • a moment of protest, but do you ever see it like that?

  • Did you ever see In Living Color as a political statement?

  • You know, at the time, we didn't,

  • but, uh, you know, the moment we were going through it,

  • it was very much about the stuff

  • that we as people of color-- black people--

  • would laugh about amongst ourselves.

  • -Right. -We were able to put it on TV.

  • So it became political, you know?

  • Sometimes you do an action as a...

  • an expression of freedom, which becomes political

  • -just because of its point of view. -Wow. Right.

  • So-so that's really what it was.

  • But in the moment, we just wanted to get off, man.

  • We just wanted to finally tell that joke.

  • You know that joke I always been telling backstage?

  • -I want to bring it here. -Right.

  • And we just threw it out there, man. But it was a ball.

  • It was a ball. I don't think I ever missed a day of work.

  • Uh, never. I mean, it was...

  • We had more fun than people watching it.

  • -It was really great. Yes. -(laughter)

  • -It felt like it. It genuinely, genuinely felt like it. -Yes.

  • And you've gone on to make people laugh.

  • I mean, like, you are one of the funniest human beings

  • -I've ever seen onscreen. -Thank you. Thank you.

  • (cheering and applause)

  • -What I... what I... -But, wait, you know, Trevor...

  • No, but what I d-- what I didn't know-- what I didn't know is

  • I-I genuinely didn't know until a few years ago

  • -how powerful you were as a dramatic actor as well. -Mm.

  • -You know? -I try to be. I try to be.

  • I don't think you try to be. I think you succeed in doing that.

  • And-and, you know, that's what this-this--

  • that's what this Broadway play's about.

  • A Soldier's Play is-is coming to Broadway,

  • and it's a powerful story.

  • Well, you know, I didn't even know

  • it had never been on Broadway.

  • I was in the original production.

  • -Right. -I took over for Larry Riley. I played C.J. Memphis.

  • And I was onstage with Sam Jackson,

  • Denzel Washington, Adolph Caesar.

  • Right. This was-- this was the play many people say

  • actually broke their careers, in many ways.

  • Yes, man. Yeah. So, I did that for about six months.

  • Then I did the movie,

  • uh, and I played Cobb, which was a different role.

  • -Mm-hmm. -And when Kenny Leon called me,

  • he said, "You know, this is the Broadway debut."

  • And I assumed it had already been on Broadway.

  • And he said, "Would you play Waters?"

  • And I had to do it, man. I had to do it.

  • So, it's been a complete circle.

  • -It's been a complete circle. -It's a--

  • it's a powerful story as well

  • that seems to-to live eternally.

  • -Mm-hmm. -You know? It-It's the story that takes place--

  • if-if I'm not mistaken-- in 1944, and...

  • -Yeah, '43. Mm. -'43. '44.

  • -'43. -Actually, '44, because it's after--

  • -Yes, you're right. -Okay.

  • -(laughter) -And so...

  • And-and it's the story, specifically, from-from--

  • you know, it's-it's a telling of a story

  • -about black soldiers -Mm-hmm.

  • -who are on a base, -Yeah. Yes.

  • dealing with the dichotomy of fighting for their country

  • -that oppresses them -Mm-hmm.

  • as second-class citizens.

  • Yeah, and there's very much this belief,

  • um, that was there historically

  • that is there with their characters that,

  • by letting us black men fight and die for our country,

  • then maybe this country will view us

  • as whole human beings and whole citizens.

  • So, uh, there's a lot of that talk

  • of, "This will change everything."

  • You know? "Just our-our participation

  • -in this war." -Right.

  • So, we deal with all that.

  • -Yeah, and-and what's interest... -And there's music.

  • -(laughing) -No, I'm just-- I'm just kidding. I'm just kidding.

  • -There's no music. -♪ It's a musical! ♪

  • (laughing)

  • (cheering and applause)

  • -There's no music! There's no music. -No, there's no music.

  • -No music. -No, but-but-- but it's a-- it's a...

  • I-I-- You know, I-I think it's a powerful story

  • not just because of what happens

  • but because it's a story that also shows you,

  • -you know, that black people are not a monolith. -Mm-mm.

  • You know, because, you know, it's not a story where it's

  • like, black versus white, it's like, no, no,

  • it's so much more complex than that.

  • It's black people themselves saying,

  • "I define myself as this, this is how I see America.

  • This is how I see America, this is how I see myself in America."

  • Well, you know what, um, I remember going to see...

  • -the original production. -Mm-hmm.

  • -Um, my college roommate Reg E. Cathey... -Oh, wow.

  • who has since passed away, but he auditioned for this role.

  • And he called me up and he said, "Listen, man.

  • "I'm not gonna get this part.

  • "But you should call your agent, tell him to send you in.

  • 'Cause I know you could get this part."

  • So, I did just that, and I went to the theater

  • the night before my audition for Douglas Turner Ward,

  • and I'm watching the play.

  • What you said was one of the unique things.

  • Back, especially back in '82,

  • -where you have these 12 ch--, uh characters. -Mm-hmm.

  • All black, but with all different opinions.

  • -Right. -All different political points of view.

  • -Mm-hmm. -So, that's really what was unique.

  • And they're all spouting it, I mean, and it was amazing

  • to see on stage, and that's really what-what gives it

  • all that meat, you know, to the story.

  • Are you ever shocked or-or disappointed

  • in any way to think that a story

  • -that was written and created in the '80s... -Mm-hmm.

  • could be as pertinent to life in America today?

  • Yeah, I mean, that, there is a sadness there.

  • And I know that, uh, talking to Kenny Leon,

  • he said that Charles Fuller, the author...

  • the playwright really...

  • his great regret to this day

  • is, I'm paraphrasing, but he said, you know,

  • "I'm still not able to be free;

  • "to walk freely in this country

  • as my true self."

  • So, that points to that.

  • You know, I'm... I'm weary.

  • I am tired of talking

  • about the same racial issues.

  • These same...

  • uh, incidents of eq-- inequality.

  • -Mm-hmm. -Uh, uh...

  • It-it's wearying, but...

  • this is where we're at.

  • We've come some way as a society,

  • but we have a lot more work to do.

  • Well, it's gonna be exciting to see you in this play

  • -playing a third character this time. -Mm-hmm.

  • The play, uh, runs until March.

  • Thank you so much for being on the show.

  • -Man... absolutely! -A true honor.

  • -Happy to be here. -A Soldier's Play.

  • Currently in previews, opens January 24

  • at the American Airlines theater on Broadway.

  • Make sure you go and see it.

  • David Alan Grier, everybody.

Welcome to the show.

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大衛-艾倫-格里爾--《阿兵哥的遊戲》的持續相關性|每日秀 (David Alan Grier - The Continued Relevance of “A Soldier’s Play” | The Daily Show)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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