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  • >>WEISS-MALIK: Hi, everyone. I'm not quite as famous as everybody else

  • here, so instead of looking at my face, we're going

  • to actually get to look at Google Earth and look at Moon

  • and Google Earth, and hopefully, that's a little more interesting.

  • If you haven't used it, Google Earth is kind of a little virtual reality globe,

  • so you can drag it around, you can zoom in and out,

  • you can go find your house is the usual thing. I quite encourage you to try it, but what

  • we're really going to talk about today, of course, is Moon

  • and Google Earth. Moon and Google Earth is easily accessed.

  • There's a button on the top tool bar that looks like a planet.

  • You pull it down, and you pick Moon. It will transition here, and basically we

  • have the same experience as Google Earth, but we're on the moon.

  • You can do all the same things except for finding your house, basically.

  • You can zoom in, you can look around; there's imagery;

  • the base terrain is from the Clementine Orbiter. The USGS, the U.S. Geological Survey, put

  • together the mosaic. This strip through the middle is from the

  • lunar metric camera, or the Apollo metric camera, sorry, that was

  • taken in the Apollo age. If we zoom in, we can find craters.

  • There's this crater here that's kind of interesting. Unlike the map's experience, Earth is actually

  • fully 3D. So we can actually tilt and fly around, and

  • actually get a sense of the space around these objects, instead

  • of just viewing the imagery. Additionally, on the left hand side, there's

  • this list of layers. So we're going to do a lot of play between

  • the 3D view in the middle and the layers. The layers basically turn on and off things,

  • and double-clicking something goes to it.

  • It's pretty intuitive. If we zoom out at this point, there's also,

  • the name of the crater there… I'm sure I'm going to pronounce it wrong…

  • but it's Timocharis, or something like that.

  • You click on them, you find out info about them.

  • If you keep zooming out, there's actually, these little red squares

  • are featured satellite images. If you click on those, you get these wonderful,

  • basically, magazine article style descriptions of what's

  • going on with annotated images, and you can read all about what's going on

  • in these images. It's great for classrooms.

  • Then, if we keep zooming out, there's also these little red squares,

  • kind of dotting the planet…I'm sorry, blue squares dotting the planet.

  • These are actually donated video by the Jackson Space Agency

  • from the [unable to understand] Orbiter. We won't play these now; we'll play some high

  • definition versions for you later on the full screen.

  • Because that screen is amazing; it's huge. If we move along here, there's… I'm

  • going to go through each of the layers on this left panel, basically.

  • We have global maps…These are, basically, global alternate versions.

  • The view that we initially had is what your naked eye would see.

  • But these are color-coded according to altitude…this terrain map.

  • And the blue dark areas are basically low-lying areas,

  • and the brighter colors are the highlands. There's a key on the left.

  • Let's go out of the global maps; let's get into some of the best stuff here.

  • Let's go look at Apollo 11. If we pop open the Apollo layers, you'll see

  • these mission badges for each of them.

  • We've got, basically, stories for every landing. If we double-click the mission badge, we're

  • actually going to zoom in and fly right down to the Apollo 11 landing

  • sites. Give it a second here to finish.

  • Every place mark on the map, once we get down here,

  • is something that the Astronauts did. There's basically stories of all the major

  • activities. The red dots are basic stories with info.

  • The camera icons are actually photos that we can fine-tune.

  • We'll do that in a minute. The You Tube ones are You Tube videos of their

  • activities. If we click on the name, Apollo 11, we get

  • this little thumbnail gallery. This is the way you navigate.

  • Each of these little thumbnails is something that they did, in sequence.

  • If we click on, say, the TV camera, you can read about

  • how they deployed the TV camera and how they tripped over the wiring,

  • almost, and it presented some challenges. There's little ‘next' and ‘previous'

  • buttons, so you can actually step along in sequence and see everything that they did.

  • We click ‘overview' to get back. Let's go next, maybe, to the lander.

  • These little photo icons you can see on the thumbnails.

  • So now we're going to fly into a street view style image.

  • This is a 360 degree panorama that the Astronauts themselves took.

  • What they actually did was take lots and lots of photos.

  • They stood in place and rotated around. And, in concert with NASA, we've stitched

  • them all together into these mostly seamless mosaics.

  • Although, if we pan down here, you can kind of catch a little piece of a leg.

  • We left many things on the moon. We did not leave part of Buzz Aldrin's leg,

  • I assure you. This is just a stitching artifact.

  • But you can zoom in and you can see the footprints. There's tons of really awesome, really cool,

  • imagery here to explore. Let's exit the photo, and we'll move on to

  • some video. So we pop open the Apollo 11 overview button

  • again. That first video is actually Neil Armstrong

  • taking his first step. Let's listen to that, and play that for a

  • second:

  • >>VIDEO: That's one small step for man…"

  • >> WEISS-MALIK: It looks like our audio feed isn't working, but we all know what he says.

  • Let's try that one more time real quick. Well, that's all right; we'll keep moving.

  • So, as we exit the Apollo 11 segments, let's zoom out.

  • This is really exciting. Somebody described…Laurie described

  • earlier that Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  • Just last week, it took images of the Apollo 11 landing site.

  • The moon is much more than just a single product. It's a platform.

  • It's very easy to put content onto it. It's like a web browser.

  • And, so, on quick turnaround over the weekend, we actually put the images from Lunar Reconnaissance

  • Orbiter into the product.

  • So we can zoom in and actually see…what we're going to see here

  • once we zoom in…that strip, that vertical strip that just loaded

  • is this image that was taken by LRO just this week.

  • We're going to zoom in and try to spot… that little flag guy

  • is where the 11 site is. As we get closer, there's a long, black shadow.

  • That's actually the shadow of the lander. These images are really amazing.

  • I'm delighted that we were able to turn them around really quickly

  • and make them in for the product.

  • [applause]

  • Now, let's pick another mission. How about we head over to Apollo 17?

  • Apollo 17…this is Jack Schmidt and Eugene Cernan…

  • they landed in the Valley of S/L Toris Litro. We can zoom in and, again, this 3-D is really

  • powerful because it actually gives you a sense of some

  • of the scale of these features. There's their spacecraft.

  • There is the valley that they landed in. We're going to pan around here.

  • And, of course, as LRO…Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter…

  • gathers better and better data, we'll be able to improve this

  • and give an even better view. Let's, real quick, click on the Apollo 17

  • overview, and we'll visit… how about the image of the Rover?

  • Where is it? That one…Yep.

  • Just up one. Now we're going to fly into it.

  • We're going back into one of these street views.

  • This is the Lunar Rover. We can zoom in again, just like that footprint

  • view, and take a look at things.

  • As we look at it, actually, we'll pan over to the right.

  • You'll notice that there's an odd-looking fender on the real right wheel.

  • We can actually learn a little bit more about that.

  • Let's exit the photo. As we exit the photo, we can then go back

  • to the thumbnail gallery, and on the top line of the thumbnail gallery,

  • there's actually a story on this fender. This was an ad hoc engineering on the moon.

  • I won't go into detail, but I encourage you to go look it up.

  • There's a really great story here. So let's go out of Apollo 17, and hit the

  • historic maps. This is a historic maps layer.

  • This is really cool. The U.S. Geological Survey put together a

  • series of 20-some poster size charts of the moon.

  • They describe the geology of the moon, and there's also

  • some topographic layers, as we zoom out here. These are really colorful wall charts.

  • Each one describes a small segment of the moon.

  • But what we've done is paste them all together so that

  • you can see them on the whole globe in context. And, in fact, you'll see that they end.

  • They only cover half of the moon because we only had

  • information on the side of the moon that faced us at the time.

  • If we click on one of them, we can actually zoom in even further.

  • This is kind of unique. And open up the original poster.

  • So what it's going to do is zoom in and give us the whole poster,

  • including the key, so these color-coded areas represent

  • different types of rock; different types of geology.

  • And we can actually zoom in and read all about what the green stuff is versus what the blue

  • stuff is. These are great for science classrooms.

  • These are great for real science. These are great for actual mission planning

  • for going to the moon. And, indeed, they were used in the Apollo

  • era for that sort of thing. And my favorite little anecdote here, if we

  • go all the way down to the very bottom right-hand corner

  • and zoom in… they are for sale for the fine price of $1.

  • But you can get them for free from us in Lunar Google Earth.

  • So it's a real bargain. Let's exit out of here.

  • And let's open the human artifacts layer. This is really cool.

  • This is a list of all the objects that have been thrown at the moon.

  • Most of them crashed, either deliberately or by accident.

  • But some of them did land successfully, very notably.

  • So let's go find Surveyor 3, because it has a very particular story behind it.

  • This is a U.S. Lander that landed in 1967. [unable to understand short phrase] it was

  • a successful project. As it loads here, we're going to have an actual

  • little 3-D model of Surveyor. But what's really cool is, you can zoom around

  • it, but if we pan up, what is that in the background but Apollo

  • 12? So, in case you didn't know, Apollo 12 actually

  • landed. They were shooting for Surveyor 3, and they