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  • Normally astronaut training takes about one full year,

  • and it includes such subjects as

  • astronomy,

  • astrophysics,

  • flight physiology,

  • orbital trajectories,

  • or orbital management.

  • Another part of the astronaut basic training is survival training.

  • In the days of Gemini,

  • you never knew for sure where a spacecraft might land

  • if there was an emergency, deorbit.

  • So, we had to take desert training,

  • water training,

  • and jungle survival training.

  • So, we had to learn how to cook and eat snake

  • and all other, such other good things as that,

  • and how to make water in a desert.

  • After that year and a half of astronaut basic training,

  • our names were all put on a list

  • and that list was quite a bit longer at that time

  • then there were seats available.

  • And so, we were all given other duties

  • to keep us occupied

  • and to help continue our training.

  • Five of us were assigned to the lunar module,

  • and our job was to be with these lunar modules

  • as they were being built.

  • So, we spent a lot of time there.

  • I must admit that probably I had more time

  • sleeping on the floor of Lunar Module #6

  • than the crew who flew it on the moon.

  • Well, my next job was to be on the support crew of Apollo 8,

  • and Apollo 8 was the spacecraft that flew to the moon

  • and came back but did not land.

  • When they went behind the moon,

  • they were supposed to do a thrusting maneuver

  • to slow them down

  • so they would be captured into lunar orbit.

  • So we just had to sit and cool our heels

  • when they went behind the moon,

  • and we knew if they came out a little early on the other side,

  • that they had not burned enough,

  • not slowed down enough,

  • and were going to skip out into space,

  • they wouldn't be captured in orbit.

  • If they came out a little bit late,

  • it meant they had over-done it,

  • and they weren't going to be in orbit,

  • but were going to begin a spiral down to the lunar surface.

  • And, of course, without a lunar module,

  • that kind of ruins your whole day.

  • You can imagine how relieved we were

  • at the instant that they were supposed

  • to appear on the other side of the moon

  • that they appeared!

  • My next assignment was again a support crew assignment on Apollo 12,

  • and Apollo 12 was struck by lightning

  • on its way off the pad.

  • A nearby thunderstorm,

  • there was a lightning bolt that went over

  • and hit the very tip of the spacecraft.

  • The charge went down through the spacecraft,

  • through the booster,

  • down the exhaust gases,

  • and grounded out on the launching pad.

  • It killed the electrical power system

  • and the computers all died.

  • You can imagine what it must have been like

  • for them inside because suddenly the lights all went out

  • and then they came back on

  • when the batteries picked up the load.

  • And, every single warning light and caution light

  • in the spacecraft was on and flashing,

  • and all the necessary bells, whistles, and buzzards

  • and things that are in there,

  • all were going off at the same time.

  • The crew was totally confused

  • as to what was going on.

  • When we were settled in orbit,

  • we tested all the various systems

  • and everything looked good.

  • So, that, now I figured this is it,

  • and sure enough, I did get an assignment,

  • a flight assignment.

  • I was assigned to the back-up crew of Apollo 16,

  • which meant that I was to be on the param crew of Apollo 19.

  • And, several weeks into the training,

  • NASA made the surprise announcment

  • that they were going to cancel Apollos 18, 19, and 20.

  • We were in the middle of the Vietnam War,

  • the budget was in bad shape,

  • so you can imagine there were three

  • very, very sad hangdog guys moping around the office

  • because we lost our flight to the moon.

  • But, several weeks later, I got a call from Tom Stafford,

  • the Senior Astronaut at that time,

  • and he wanted me in his office,

  • and I went in,

  • and he told me that he was sorry

  • that I had missed my opportunity for the moon,

  • but he said, "I've got another assignment for you."

  • He said, "I want you to be the commander

  • of the third and final Skylab mission."

  • And, he said, "Do you think you could do the job?"

  • And I said, "Of course, yes!"

  • And, I'll have to admit,

  • a certain lump in my chest and in my stomach,

  • because I was a rookie,

  • and they normally don't assign a rookie to be a commander,

  • usually you have to have at least one flight under your belt,

  • but they assigned me to that,

  • which was really kind of a shock

  • because the last rookie commander was Neil Armstrong on Gemini 8.

Normally astronaut training takes about one full year,

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TED-Ed】太空人的生活--傑瑞-卡爾。 (【TED-Ed】Life of an astronaut - Jerry Carr)

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    阿多賓 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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