Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • How much do you know about reductions?

  • How much do you use them when speaking English?

  • Reductions are one of the best ways to sound natural when speaking English,

  • and knowing them will also be one of the best ways to improve your listening comprehension.

  • In this video, were going to dive deep on some of my favorite reductions

  • and youll get so many examples of these reductions in real spoken English

  • that you will absolutely be able to start identifying these in conversation better

  • and feel more confident using these reductions when speaking English.

  • Function words that begin with H likehe’, ‘him’, ‘her’, ‘have’ — theyre often pronounced WITHOUT the H sound.

  • I realized that I have lots of videos from real English conversations where we study these reductions,

  • but that in any one of these videos, you may hear a reduction just once or twice.

  • I thought, I’ve been making videos for 10 years now,

  • I have to make a compilation of all the examples from real life English that I have of these reductions.

  • When you hear many examples of a reduction that youre studying,

  • it almost guarantees that youll start to identify it in other English

  • conversation, movies, TVto improve your listening comprehension.

  • Youll also have lots of examples to study with.

  • Watch the video once, then go back and watch the examples again and pause after each sentence.

  • Say it out loud.

  • Train your mind to think of this reduction.

  • First, let’s play the video where I go over how to make these reductions and how theyre used.

  • Youve got to know that first.

  • Then well jump into the examples.

  • Today were going to talk about the situation with the letter H beginning a word.

  • Let’s look at the following sentence as an example: I’ll tell her were leaving.

  • I’ll tell her were leaving.

  • I’ll tell her were leaving.

  • I’ll tell her were leaving.

  • Could you tell a difference in the two different ways I pronounced this?

  • I’ll tell herer … I didn’t pronounce the H inher’.

  • I’ll tell her were leaving.

  • I reduced the wordherby leaving out the H.

  • Perhaps youve noticed this.

  • Native speakers do it quite a lot.

  • Now, if you drop the H, you have to be certain that you link it to the word before.

  • Tell her, tell her, it’s almost like it becomes one word.

  • Teh-ler, tell her.

  • How do you think I’m going to pronounce this phrase?

  • I’m going to drop the H, reducing the wordhe’.

  • And because I’m going to do that, I want to make sure that I really link things.

  • So I’m actually going to almost think of the Z sound as beginning a wordzi’.

  • Wuh-zi there?

  • Was he there?

  • Was he there?

  • Try saying that all very smooth and linked.

  • Was he there?

  • Was he there?

  • Before we go further, let’s talk quickly about punctuation.

  • A period, a comma, a colon, a semicolon, a dash: these things will all signify a stop, a break, a pause.

  • So, we don’t want to link sounds over that kind of punctuation.

  • Let’s take a look at an example sentence.

  • At first he never came; he now comes regularly.

  • Notice there was that pause there where the semicolon is.

  • And because of that I didn’t link, and I didn’t drop the H inhethe second time.

  • He now comes regularly.

  • At first he never came: I do drop that H, reducing the word and linking.

  • At first he, at first he, at first he never came; he now comes regularly.

  • So weve looked atheandher’, what are some other possibilities?

  • If were going to reduce a word, it has to be an unstressed word.

  • So let’s review what words will be stressed and which ones will be unstressed.

  • Content words are stressed.

  • These are nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs, in general.

  • Function words will be unstressed.

  • These are words that don’t have a meaning on their own, likewithorif’.

  • These are prepositions, conjunctions, articles, and helping verbs.

  • So, common function words beginning with H: has, have, had.

  • These are helping verbs.

  • Example: What have you done?

  • What have you done?

  • Notice that the H is dropped inhave’, and the vowel is actually reduced from AA to the schwa: uv, uv, uv.

  • That is how were pronouncing the wordhavein the sentence.

  • What have, what have, what have you done?

  • And do note that it’s linked to everything around it.

  • What have you, what have you, what have you done?

  • Another example: my friend has seen it twice.

  • The wordhasis pronounced without the H and again, the vowel sound is reduced to the schwa.

  • My friend has, has, has, my friend has seen it twice.

  • Also, again, it is linked to everything around it.

  • My friend has seen it twice.

  • How do you think I will pronounce 'her' here?

  • If you guessed 'er', you're right.

  • I saw her sister in Chicago.

  • I saw -er sister.

  • Saw her sister, saw her sister.

  • I saw her sister in Chicago.

  • And here, how will I pronouncehis’?

  • Iz, iz, I will drop that H.

  • What was his name again?

  • What was, iz, name again?

  • What was his name again?

  • What was his name again?

  • And how will I pronouncehim’?

  • I will drop that H.

  • Im, ‘Im.

  • I told him no.

  • I toldimno.

  • I told him no.

  • I told him no.

  • How will I pronouncehis’?

  • I’m going to drop the H.

  • Do you remember John?

  • This is his sister.

  • This isissister.

  • This is his sister.

  • This video was made at a Christmas party I had with my housemates.

  • Youll hear a ‘herreduction.

  • Jovan, that's also some excellent handiwork.

  • Tell her about the dots.

  • Tell her about the dots.

  • Did you notice the dropped H?

  • It's not uncommon to drop the beginning H in unaccented words like her, him, and his.

  • If you do this, always link it to the word before.

  • Tell her, tell her. Tell her about the dots.

  • Listen again.

  • Tell her about the dots.

  • Tell her about the dots.

  • Tell her about the dots.

  • Yes, this is actually Braille for cookie.

  • This video I shot at Coney Island with friends.

  • Youll hear anotherherreduction here.

  • We want funnel cake but we don't know if we can use our tickets!

  • Aaah! The frustration!

  • Why don't you just ask her?

  • It's common practice in english to drop the h in words like her, his, him.

  • So her becomes er, er.

  • Make sure that you link this to the word before.

  • Ask her, ask her, just ask her.

  • This smooths out the language and sounds more natural.

  • Why don't you just ask her?

  • Why don't you just ask her?

  • Why don't you just ask her?

  • I made this video when I was baking with my friend Laura.

  • Notice the dropped H inhave’.

  • So this needs to be 3 minutes...

  • Oh yeah, let that stand for 3 minutes and I took the clock out of the room because it was so freaking loud.

  • Okay.

  • Don't you have a watch on?

  • Did you notice that Laura dropped the H in 'have'?

  • This is a common reduction.

  • Dropping the H in function words like have, had, her, his.

  • You have a, you have a.

  • Don't you have a watch on?

  • Don't you have a watch on?

  • Don't you have a watch on?

  • Don't you have a watch on?

  • Don't you have a watch on?

  • Here’s another video where I’m baking with my same friend Laura, only a few years later.

  • Were still using dropped H reductions!

  • Here, it’s the dropped H inhim’.

  • And the baby’s up.

  • Okay, let me go get him.

  • Let me go get him.

  • A couple reductions here.

  • Let mebecomes lemme.

  • And the H is dropped inhim’.

  • Dropping the H in this word is a really common reduction.

  • When we do this, it sounds just like when we dropped the TH inthem’.

  • 'Get him' becomes get im, just like 'put them' was put em.

  • The flap T links the words and the reduction of 'them' and 'him' are the exact same sounds schwa and m.

  • Get em.

  • Put em.

  • Okay, let me go get him.

  • Okay, let me go get him.

  • Okay, let me go get him.

  • Can you look right there?

  • Say Hi! I just had a nice nap.

  • Can you say: Hey everybody!

  • Here, were watching a tennis match between members of my family.

  • Youll hear a dropped H inhimandher’.

  • Don't go easy on him Ernie!

  • Easy on him.

  • What do you notice about the word 'him'?

  • No H.

  • We pronounce 'him' this way a lot.

  • Just like 'our', when it's reduced, think of adding an extra syllable to the end of the word before it.

  • On him, on him.

  • Easy on him.

  • Listen again.

  • Don't go easy on him Ernie!

  • Don't go easy on him Ernie!

  • Don't go easy on him Ernie!

  • Let me go check on him.

  • Here's another 'him' reduction.

  • Check on him.

  • On him, on him, on him.

  • Listen again.

  • Check on him.

  • Check on him.

  • Check on him.

  • Same vacation, no more tennis.

  • Another dropped H in 'him'.

  • Is he messing up your coloring?

  • Is he messing you up?

  • Should we move him?

  • Move him.

  • Dropped H in 'him'.

  • Move him.

  • Move him.

  • Should we move him?

  • Should we move him?

  • Should we move him?

  • Yeah!

  • No. No.

  • Tell him no!

  • In this video, my family is meeting my first son for the first time.

  • It’s another dropped H inhim

  • How is it to hold him?

  • Oh, how is it?

  • Oh, I don’t know. It’s beyond description.

  • How is it to hold him?

  • What do you notice about the word him in this phrase?

  • How is it to hold him?

  • How is it to hold him?

  • How is it to hold him?

  • The h was dropped.

  • Hold him, hold him.

  • And the two words linked together with no gap in between.

  • This is a very common conversational pronunciation of function words that begin with H like him,

  • her, his, have, has, and had.

  • How is it to hold him?

  • In this video, I’m at a nature reserve with my family.

  • A dropped H inhave’.

  • First, we chatted with a ranger.

  • Wait, we came, he's never, some of these people have never seen a gator before.

  • Here's an example of a dropping the H reduction.

  • Instead ofpeople have’, i said: people uv--

  • dropping the h and reducing the ah vowel to the schwa.

  • Nowhavejust sounds like a third unstressed syllable at the end of people.

  • People uv, people uv.

  • Try that with me.

  • People have, people have.

  • Listen again.

  • Wait, we came, he's never, some of these people have never

  • Some of these people have never

  • Some of these people have never seen a gator before.

  • There you go, many examples from my past 10 years of making videos on these reductions.

  • He, him, her, have, had, has.

  • Dropping the H in these words is so common in natural English.

  • Watch this video a few times, pause, and say the examples out loud.

  • This will focus your brain on the reductions

  • and youll start to notice it more and more as you hear them around you.

  • You look like youre interested in a full playlist of other reductions in American English.

  • You know I’ve got that covered for you.

  • Click here or in the description below.

  • That’s it, and thanks so much for using Rachel’s English!

How much do you know about reductions?

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

A2 初級

FLUENT ENGLISH: The "H" Reduction in American English Pronunciation | Rachel's English (FLUENT ENGLISH: The “H” Reduction in American English Pronunciation | Rachel’s English)

  • 8 1
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日