Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Pick uppick up, pick up pick up…” “Hello, hey this is Niharika here, can you

  • put me through Mr. Johnson please?” “Hello? Hello? Hello?” “Ah! Bad connection…”

  • well I got jarred off.” Hey this is Niharika here, welcome back in today's lesson we are

  • gonna look attelephone phrasal verbs.” Hi friends welcome back well in today's lesson

  • we are gonna look attelephone phrasal verbs.” Now we have learnt about telephone

  • skills, we have learnt about different telephone phrases that we end up using when we are having

  • a conversation with someone over the phone, but then what are phrasal verbs? Now here

  • I have eight phrasal verbs that you can use when you are talking to someone or when you're

  • trying to get connected to someone over the phone. So let's see what they are and how

  • you would end up using them. The first phrasal verb that I have for you is, “pick up”.

  • Now what does this really mean? Well pick up means, to answer a telephone call. So when

  • you want someone to answer the call, your phone is ringing and you want someone to answer

  • the call, you can end up using the phrasal verb, ‘pick up’. “Hey, could you please

  • pick up the call for me?” So which means you're asking someone to answer the call for

  • you. Or when you are trying to get connected to someone and that person is not answering,

  • then you think to yourself that, “ah, why he is not picking up?” So which means that,

  • why is he not answering the call?’ okay? So that's how you can use this phrasal verb.

  • Moving on to the next phrasal verb that we have related to telephone is, “put through”.

  • When do you use this? Well put through is when you are trying to connect someone to

  • somebody. Okay so probably someone calls you and asks for a person that they want to speak

  • to, so they would use the phrasal verb, ‘put through’. For example, “hey could you

  • please put me through the doctor, it's an emergency.” So you want to get connected

  • to the doctor because you want to speak to him, okay? So when you want to get connected,

  • or when you want to talk to someone, you end up using the phrasal verb, ‘put through’,

  • okay? “Could you please put me through to the dentist please?” Okay that's how you

  • can use this phrasal verb. Moving on to the next one that I have for you which is, “hang

  • on”. Now we have two phrasal verbs that you can use when you want to ask someone to

  • wait, okay? Or to hold the line. So if you want to use an informal phrasal verb, then

  • you can use, ‘hang on’. “hey could you please hang on for a minute, I'll put him

  • through.” Okay, ‘hang oncan be used in an informal way, but in informal way the

  • phrasal verb that you can use is, “hold on”. “could you please hold on for a minute?”

  • Okay, so when you want to ask someone to wait for a minute or so, for a short period, over

  • that phone, then you can usehang onorhold on’, alright? Let's move on to

  • the next phrasal verb that we have for you which is, “get through”. “I can't get

  • through the operator, what's wrong?” So what does get through really mean? Well get

  • through means that you are unable to connect to someone. Okay so you desperately want to

  • talk to someone and you're just not able to get connected, for various reasons. Maybe

  • someone is not picking up the call, someone is not putting you through, okay so for example

  • you call someone and it's the operator and you know, she's not putting you through so

  • yes you can't get through Mr. Johnson. Okay, so there are various reasons that you're not

  • able to get connected to the person that you want to speak to. So get through is, to get

  • connected. Of course over the phone, alright? To get connected over the phone and that is

  • when you can use the phrasal verb, ‘get through’, alright? The next phrasal verb

  • that I have for you is, “ring back”. “oh I am really busy and I have to ring back or

  • I'll have to call you back.” So there are two phrasal verbs that you can use when you

  • are telling someone that yes I will call you or I will return your call. So you can either

  • use that, “hey, I'll have to ring you back, I am extremely busy right now.” Or you can

  • use the phrasal verb, ‘call back’. “I'll have to call you back because I'm very busy

  • right now”, okay? So when you are telling someone that, ‘yes I will return your call’,

  • these are the two phrasal verbs that you can use in English. Alright, moving on to the

  • next phrasal verb that we have is, “speak up”. “Could you be speak up, hello?”

  • “I can't hear you, could you please speak up?” Well when you say that speak up or

  • when you are asking someone to speak up, it means that you're asking someone to speak

  • a little louder, you can't hear him. Maybe there's bad Network or the person just speaks

  • very slow and you can't really hear him. So he's not audible to you, so you would ask

  • that person to speak up. Okay, so speak up means when you're asking someone to speak

  • louder, right? Now you don't have to really scream on top of your lungs, when you're asking

  • someone else to be louder you can just say that hey I'm unable to hear you, could you

  • please speak up? Okay, so be nice, you don't have to shout. Moving on to the next phrasal

  • verb which is, “jarred off”. Now you can either use the phrasal verb, “jarred off

  • or you can use, “cut off”. Now when a telephone conversation is interrupted, probably

  • because the call got disconnected or are probably there’s bad network and you're not able

  • to get through that person, then you can either use the phrasal verb, “jarred off”, “oh,

  • well the conversation was jarred off”, well because the conversation was interrupted,

  • maybe because of a bad network, bad connection or maybe because someone just hung up. So

  • jarred off or cut off. “Oops! Well the telephone call was cut off.” So cut off again it means

  • when the conversation is interrupted, okay? And then the last phrasal verb that I have

  • for you is, “hang up”. Now hang up can be used in two different ways, when you just

  • disconnect the call you say, “okay, I'll talk to you later, I'll have to hang up right

  • now.” So hang up is when you're telling a person that, yes I'm gonna go ahead and

  • disconnect the call. But it is also used when you are really mad at someone, you're angry,

  • you just don't want to speak to that person and you hang up, so you disconnect in a very

  • rude manner without even saying a bye. So my mom was so upset with me, because I was

  • out all night long with my friends and when I called her well she hung up on me. So, “hang

  • upcan be used to disconnect the call. “oh yes, it's time to get to work, so I'm

  • gonna hang up, I'll talk to you later.” That is when you can use this phrasal verb

  • but you can also use it when you are telling someone that yes this person was so angry

  • was so mad at me that she hung up on me, okay? So when someone is angry and disconnects the

  • call then you can use the phrasal verb, ‘hang up’. Alright, so these are the eight telephone

  • phrasal verbs that you can use on daily basis. So it's not just about using various telephone

  • phrases but yes when it comes to talking over the phone or when you're trying to get connected

  • to someone, then these are the eight phrasal verbs that you can use in English. So start

  • using them if you aren't using them and I'll be back with a new lesson soon, till then

  • you take care.

Pick uppick up, pick up pick up…” “Hello, hey this is Niharika here, can you

字幕與單字

單字即點即查 點擊單字可以查詢單字解釋

A2 初級

電話英語☎️短語動詞 - 提高英語口語|職場英語口語流利度 (Telephone English ☎️ Phrasal Verbs - Improve English Speaking | Speak English Fluently At Workplace)

  • 6 3
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字