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  • Today I have some guests on the channel!

  • This is Louis and Dave!

  • You guys might remember Louis from

  • a few videos I did from Istanbul a year and a half ago.

  • They're both in Tokyo right now so

  • I've asked them to help me with a lesson for you guys!

  • I get a lot of tweets asking to explain the difference

  • between British English and American English

  • so today I'm going to have these British guys help me!

  • So we are going to be talking about the difference

  • between ... or differences between

  • British English and American English

  • You both speak British English.

  • We do.

  • We try.

  • Could we get a brief introduction from both of you?

  • Yeah, so I'm Louis Cole

  • and I've got a channel "Fun for Louis"

  • where I do daily vlogs and travel the world

  • and that's where we met,

  • me doing my daily vlogs in Istanbul.

  • and I'm Dave Erasumus

  • and I do experiments.

  • I try all kinds of different things

  • that are new and difficult for me.

  • So they're here with a project,

  • which they'll tell you about later, but

  • let's just get started with some differences.

  • First of all, I really like British English accents

  • What do you guys thing of American English?

  • I think that people from England or Britain

  • are more used to American accents

  • We hear it in all the movies.

  • It's like way more common for us to know about

  • American culture and accents.

  • When we go to America, I find that

  • Americans are more obsessed and excited

  • to meet someone from England

  • or you know, hear our accents.

  • We'll just go over some very basic things

  • like R's at the end of words

  • we pronounce different like the word "color"

  • Oh yeah!

  • I didn't even notice that.

  • Yeah we miss R's off a lot of words, right?

  • but you know, the spelling of color is different as well.

  • Yes, there's a "U" in it.

  • Yeah, we have a "U" in it.

  • We have a "U", I don't know why.

  • Yes, it's just short isn't it?

  • It's very windy.

  • We're on the roof of a building.

  • Don't ask why.

  • I actually think that British English is a little bit more

  • easy for Japanese people to pronounce

  • because Japanese people have a hard time saying R.

  • Oh, I've got an interesting story.

  • When I was last here,

  • I've got a friend who is Japanese and

  • she had an app on her phone that helped her

  • tell the difference between L and R.

  • because it sounds the same.

  • Right.

  • Right and light, we both say...

  • it's ライト for both of them.

  • So they're like, what's the difference?

  • and it's harder to hear because of the way

  • the language is.

  • It's harder to tell the difference between L and R.

  • See, this is why we don't say our R's

  • because we want to help Japanese people understand!

  • It's the only reason I do it.

  • Do you know as well,

  • if you get really lazy in British English

  • you can say... you can drop your T's as well

  • so in america it would be "water"

  • No, we say "water"

  • We say "water"

  • So you cut the T and R!

  • Really??

  • Oh, I thought it was "water"

  • but that's kind of a lazy way to say it.

  • More poshly, you would say, you know,

  • I'd like some water, please.

  • In American English, you say, it's like "water"

  • Water. Yeah, exactly!

  • We would say "water."

  • But it's also different within the UK, right?

  • Yeah.

  • Oh, really different!

  • You both are from?

  • Near London.

  • So south of England is pretty same-ish.

  • and then you get West Country,

  • I can't deal with the accents, but

  • the north of England.

  • and it's not ... geographically it's not that far

  • but the accents get crazy different!

  • Scotland!

  • Sorry, one second.

  • moshi moshi, are you here?

  • We're on the roof.

  • Moshi moshi. What does this mean?

  • It's "hello" just on the phone though.

  • You can't say it in real life?

  • Just on the phone.

  • Is there an equivalent in English?

  • I don't think so.

  • Just say hello, right?

  • Yeah, hi.

  • What's up?!

  • I'm going to use moshi moshi then!

  • When we're on the phone?

  • Yeah, let's do it.

  • I'm going to use it. I like it!

  • There are a few words,

  • that I didn't even know you guys pronounced like this,

  • but how do you pronounce that word?

  • I mean, I can see that.

  • Maybe we're adding more syllables.

  • We are adding an i in.

  • Wait, unless we spell it differently!

  • Do you?

  • I can't remember.

  • Oh, speaking of spelling

  • How do you spell pajamas?

  • or do you even say pajamas?

  • Oh, there's a Y in there.

  • We have a Y in our pajamaas.

  • I had no idea!

  • "adult" you say?

  • Yes, that's different.

  • It's just emphasizing different letters, isn't it?

  • It's a little different.

  • That one surprised me too.

  • Those are the words that we...

  • we have the same words, but we pronounce differently

  • and then, we also have words that are

  • completely different.

  • For example, like famous ones are

  • elevator

  • and lift

  • Pants?

  • Trousers.

  • Unless, you really want to talk about my pants.

  • Pants are underwear!

  • I made a video where I was introducing

  • these new pants that I got

  • they were like "Don't say pants!"

  • "It sounds so weird!"

  • vaccum cleaner

  • hoover

  • Because of the brand, right?

  • and the reverse is

  • we say "band-aid"

  • and we say "plaster"

  • because band-aid is the brand.

  • Oh, I see, yeah!

  • the opposite of the hoover vacuum thing.

  • Yes! Yes!

  • On a car, everything is different, right?

  • The hood is the bonnet.

  • The trunk is the boot.

  • The blinker is the indicator.

  • The gear shift...

  • The gear shift is the...

  • wait ... the gear stick.

  • so many differences.

  • Cars are just completely different.

  • Okay some vegetables that I would never even know!

  • Eggplant! What do you call eggplant?

  • Aubergine!

  • Yeah! I didn't know that.

  • aubergine... and you call...

  • zucchinis we call courgettes

  • But aubergine and courgette are actually

  • French words which we've adopted, I guess.

  • Okay, that makes sense.

  • Same in Japan.

  • Like they adopt words from everywhere

  • some of them are American English

  • some of them are French

  • some of them are..

  • So everyone gets very confused.

  • Would you say "I want to rub it out" though?

  • No, we erase it.

  • We would...

  • Give me my rubber, please.

  • I'd like to rub it out.

  • Because when we say rubber

  • we think of condoms

  • Yeah, we never call condoms rubbers.

  • You just call them condoms?

  • It's usually a rated G channel

  • but sorry. Just had to clear that up.

  • Oh this one was... What do you call a drug store?

  • or a pharmacist?

  • Pharmacy, yeah.

  • Don't you call it a chemist's shop?

  • Going to the chemist.

  • Yeah, we call it going to the chemist.

  • That's so weird!

  • That's true, that is weird!

  • I haven't thought about that in a long time.

  • So even with all of these different words though

  • we manage to understand each other

  • which is kind of interesting.

  • Well, I have to adopt my language...

  • When I'm in America, I change what I say.

  • Like, we say car park instead of parking lot as well.

  • I change what I say because a lot of Americans

  • don't understand what I say.

  • but you know because American English

  • is common enough for you guys.

  • Yeah, yeah.

  • I've started saying "restroom" like wherever I am now.

  • I say "restroom," which I adopted

  • from being in America because

  • They don't understand toilet

  • or "loo."

  • you know, I can't.. I can't, no on knows

  • They understand toilet, don't they?

  • No, this is a funny story, right?

  • I went into a hardware store, like a big

  • Home Depot store, right?

  • and I said, "oh, where are your toilets?"

  • because I needed to go to the toilet

  • and they said follow me

  • and they walked, right?

  • and then they arrived, and they were selling the toilets!

  • and I was like, "No, I don't want to buy a toilet..."

  • I want to use the toilet

  • I don't think you want me to use it here...

  • I think otherwise, they would have understood you.

  • Maybe, yeah.

  • Okay, so those were some of the differences!

  • There's a lot more!

  • but I wanted to take this opportunity

  • to have these guys on my channel

  • because they're very cool!

  • and very fun, as you guys saw!

  • and before we go,

  • if you guys want to tell them a little bit about

  • why you're here and your project.

  • Yeah, so we're traveling the world right now.

  • We've been to... started in London

  • We went to Ethiopia and Africa

  • We went to Dubai. We went to...

  • New Delhi, Shanghai, Seoul,

  • and now we're here in Tokyo.

  • and we're going to go on to Rio and Brazil

  • and Reykjavik in Iceland.

  • That's our full tour.

  • and we're doing it in a month

  • so we're like completely jet lagged!

  • and what are we doing?

  • We're looking to have conversations with people

  • in every country.

  • about how they see the world,

  • what kind of problems they see

  • and big ideas that could help that country

  • or the world at large flourish more.

  • and then on the 28th of April,

  • we'll be launching a big application window basically,

  • where people can submit video ideas