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  • Hi.

  • I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • How fast can you speak English?

  • Let's talk about it.

  • Have you ever thought, "Oh my goodness.

  • English speakers speak so fast.

  • How will I ever be able to speak like that?"

  • Well, today I have some good news for you.

  • I'm going to share with you seven important tips that native speakers use when they speak

  • quickly.

  • We're going to talk about reducing sounds, cutting off sounds, and connecting sounds.

  • Then, at the end of this lesson, I have a challenge sentence for you that I want you

  • to be able to say as fast as you possibly can.

  • So, let's get started with the first tip.

  • My first tip for speaking fast English is to use contractions.

  • What are contractions?

  • They're when you put two words together.

  • I'd like to go is I would like to go.

  • He's busy.

  • He is busy.

  • What're you doing?

  • What are you doing?

  • If you'd like some tips about how to pronounce 81 contractions, I made a video about that

  • up here to help your pronunciation.

  • But, this first tip is the most simple.

  • We'll talk about some more difficult tips later.

  • And it's an easy way to speak quickly.

  • I'd like to go.

  • I would like to go.

  • Do you see how we can speak quicker because we're cutting off all the sounds in the word

  • would except for that final D?

  • I'd like to go.

  • Great.

  • Let's go on to the second tip.

  • My second tip for speaking fast English is to reduce these four common verbs.

  • Gonna, wanna, gotta, hafta.

  • I'm gonna study English means I'm going to study English.

  • That word to simply becomes a.

  • I'm gonna study English.

  • Or you might say, "I wanna study English."

  • Here, we're changing want to to wanna.

  • Again, the word to changes to a.

  • I wanna study English.

  • Or maybe you will say, "I gotta study English."

  • Here we have a longer verb.

  • I have got to study English becomes I gotta.

  • I gotta study English.

  • And then you might say, "I hafta study English."

  • Have to, here again, to changes to a.

  • I hafta study English.

  • Can you say these with me?

  • I'm gonna study English.

  • I wanna study English.

  • I gotta study English.

  • I hafta study English.

  • Beautiful sentences, and it's so fast.

  • My third tip for speaking fast English is to reduce the word you when you're asking

  • a question.

  • We're going to talk about three common question words.

  • And unfortunately, the word you reduces in a different way for each question.

  • So, listen carefully, and let's check it out.

  • The first question word is what.

  • How can we reduce the question, "What are you doing?"

  • What are you doing?

  • We could reduce this to say, "Whatcha doin'?"

  • Whatcha, whatcha.

  • It sounds like a CH sound here.

  • Actually, we've cut out completely the word are, and the word you just becomes cha.

  • Whatcha doing?

  • You might notice, too, extra tip that the end of the word doing that G also gets cut

  • out.

  • Whatcha doin'?

  • Whatcha doin'?

  • So, I end that word with an N. Whatcha doin'?

  • Whatcha doin'?

  • Oh, I'm teaching in English lesson.

  • Oh, I'm studying English.

  • I'm going to sleep.

  • Whatcha doin'?

  • Whatcha doin'?

  • Whatcha.

  • Whatcha doin'?

  • Let's talk about the second WH question.

  • Whereya goin'?

  • Whereya goin'?

  • Do you notice the same thing happening here with that ing at the end?

  • Whereya goin'?

  • It ends with an N. What is happening with the word you?

  • Where ya, we just changed it to ya, ya, not you, but Y-A.

  • Whereya goin'?

  • And again, we cut out are.

  • Where are you going?

  • Whereya goin'?

  • Whereya goin'?

  • Whereya goin'?

  • What about if you wanted to ask a polite question?

  • Would you help me?

  • Maybe you need some help in the office.

  • You might ask this lovely question.

  • Would you help me?

  • But if you want to say it fast, you could say, Wouldja help me?

  • Wouldja help me?

  • Wouldja help me?

  • Instead of a ch sound, like we talked about before, whatcha doing, here, instead, we're

  • going to say ja.

  • Wouldja help me?

  • Can you say that with me?

  • Wouldja.

  • Wouldja help me?

  • Would you help me becomes would ja.

  • Wouldja help me?

  • Wouldja help me, please?

  • Tips number four, five, and six include cutting off sounds.

  • These are a little bit more tricky, so let's pay attention carefully.

  • Tip number four for speaking fast English is to cut off the T at the end of words.

  • Ooh, what about this sentence?

  • I go out every night.

  • I go out every night.

  • Do you hear I go out every night?

  • No.

  • Instead, your tongue is at the top of your mouth.

  • You're about to make the T sound, but no air goes through, so it's just stopped at the

  • top of your mouth.

  • I go ou' every nigh'.

  • I go ou' every nigh'.

  • If you would like to know some more common sentences and English that use this, we use

  • this all the time, but you can check out this video I made up here about how to pronounce

  • the most common sentences in English.

  • I go ou' every nigh'.

  • Can you say that with me?

  • I go ou' every nigh'.

  • Tip number five for fast English is to cut off the letter D at the end of words.

  • Let's check out this sample sentence.

  • I found a blue and white card.

  • I found a blue and white card.

  • I found a blue and white card.

  • Maybe you found a blue and white card on the street, and it was a birthday card that someone

  • just threw out their window.

  • I found a blue and white card.

  • I foun'.

  • The word ends in the letter N. I foun' a blue an'white ... Here, the word and is

  • being reduced.

  • Just cut off that final D sound.

  • I foun' a blue an' white car', car'.

  • This is a little bit different than the word car.

  • I drive a car, because your mouth is making the shape of that D sound, but it's not making

  • the vibrations happening.

  • You're not actually making a D sound, but your mouth is making that shape car', car'.

  • My tongue is flat against the roof of my mouth to make the D, but it's not coming out car',

  • car'.

  • Can you say that sentence with me?

  • I foun' a blue an' white car'.

  • I foun' a blue an' white car'.

  • I foun' a blue an' white car'.

  • My sixth tip for speaking fast English is quite advanced.

  • It is to cut off the first sounds with a few pronouns: him, his, her, and them.

  • Let's look at a couple of sample sentences.

  • I think he's right.

  • I think he's right.

  • I think he's right?

  • There's no H happening here.

  • I think 'e, think 'e.

  • Kind of sounds like you're saying thinky.

  • I think 'e's right.

  • Do you notice too at the end of the word right there's no T sound?

  • I think 'e's righ'.

  • I think 'e's righ'.

  • I think 'e is righ'.

  • We do this all the time.

  • Let's go on to another pronoun.

  • It's his turn.