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  • Hi.

  • I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Are you ready to test your grammar skills?

  • Let's do it.

  • Today I have a fun grammar test for you.

  • Fun?

  • Grammar?

  • Test?

  • Is it possible?

  • Yes, it's definitely possible.

  • Just watch and see.

  • In this lesson you'll learn seven common English grammar mistakes and how to fix them, but

  • the trick is, you have to guess what the mistake is.

  • Fun.

  • I'm going to show you seven sentences, and you need to find one change in each sentence.

  • Maybe that's taking something out, maybe that's adding something, maybe it's exchanging something.

  • Let's take a look at a quick example.

  • This sentence, "I love dog."

  • There's one mistake here, can you guess what it is?

  • What do we need to change to make this beautifully correct?

  • Well we need to say, "I love dogs."

  • You need to add an 's' at the end.

  • This is a pretty simple example.

  • So are you ready for some more advanced grammar sentences?

  • Let's do it.

  • Let's imagine that we're in a coffee shop together drinking some coffee.

  • Well maybe that's not such a good idea because, if I had a cup of coffee, I would be running

  • around the coffee shop non-stop.

  • So how about this?

  • I'm drinking some tea, you're drinking some coffee, and we're having a lovely conversation

  • together.

  • And you say to me, "So how's it been going lately?"

  • And I say, sentence number one, "I bought the new Ferrari yesterday."

  • What's one thing that you can change in this sentence to make it correct?

  • This sentence is not correct.

  • There's something that's wrong with this sentence.

  • Can you guess?

  • I'll give you three seconds.

  • Three, two, one.

  • "I bought a new Ferrari yesterday."

  • You have this image in your head of us sitting in the coffee shop, do you think that we're

  • looking at the car right now?

  • No.

  • We're just kind of imagining this car.

  • It's not something specific, it's something unknown, so we need to use 'a.'

  • Maybe after we have our drinks, we go out to the parking lot, and I say, "This is the

  • new Ferrari that I bought."

  • This is the new Ferrari.

  • We're looking at it, we know which one it is, it's right there.

  • So we need to use 'the' to talk about something known and 'a' for something that's less known.

  • Test sentence number two: I wanted a Ferrari because it's too fast.

  • I wanted a Ferrari because it's too fast.

  • What's wrong in this sentence?

  • Three, two, one.

  • I wanted a Ferrari because it's really fast.

  • We only use 'too' in negative situations.

  • The coffee is too hot, I can't drink it.

  • I'm too tired, I can't study.

  • Maybe I could have said, "My old car was too slow."

  • You can see here that, in all of these situations, there's something negative.

  • The coffee's too hot, I'm too tired, the car is too slow.

  • There's a problem in all of these sentences, so I probably want to fix it.

  • And in the sentence with the Ferrari, I think that the Ferrari is really fast, so that's

  • why I want it.

  • If you're curious about some differences between 'too' and 'so,' I made a live lesson about

  • this a long time ago, about two years ago, and you can watch that video up here.

  • All right.

  • Sentence number three: when I bought the car, it costs $300,000.

  • When I bought the car, it costs $300,000.

  • That's a lot of money.

  • All right.

  • What is one thing that you can do, to change in this sentence, to make it correct?

  • Three, two, one.

  • When I bought the car ... notice this is the past tense ... bought the car, it costs?

  • This is the present tense.

  • We need to say, "It cost $300,000."

  • The word 'cost' is an irregular verb and often these irregular verbs trip up or trick English

  • learners.

  • So we need to make sure that we use the proper past tense.

  • It cost $300,000.

  • Sentence number four.

  • Maybe after I told you how much the car cost, you say, "Oh Vanessa.

  • That's so much money.

  • Why would you do something like that?"

  • And I say, "Well I think I'm going eating rice and beans for a whole year.

  • I think I'm going eating rice and beans for a whole year."

  • This means nothing fancy, nothing special, only rice and beans because I spent all my

  • money on a car.

  • What's the problem with this sentence?

  • Three, two, one.

  • "I think I'm going to eat rice and beans for a whole year."

  • Often English learners have problems with '-ing' and 'to.'

  • It depends on a lot of different factors, but specifically for the verb going, when

  • we're talking about this in the future.

  • I'm going to eat rice and beans.

  • I'm going to study with Vanessa.

  • I'm going to sleep soon.

  • Well we need to use 'to' plus an unconjugated verb.

  • I'm going to study.

  • I'm going to eat.

  • I'm going to sleep.

  • Great.

  • All right.

  • Let's go to the next one.

  • Number five: for my whole life, I always dreamed of owning a Ferrari.

  • For my whole life, I always dreamed of owning a Ferrari.

  • What's the problem in this sentence?

  • Can you guess?

  • Do we need to add something, take something away, switch something?

  • I'll give you three seconds.

  • Three, two, one.

  • For my whole life, I had always dreamed of owning a Ferrari.

  • Why did we add 'had' here?

  • This is the past perfect tense, and I know it can be tricky for a lot of English learners.

  • We use the past perfect tense to talk about something that was continuing for a long time

  • in the past and now it has stopped.

  • Do you know why my dream has stopped?

  • Well because it came true.

  • I own a Ferrari ... of course this is a fake situation, just imaginary.

  • But because this dream came true, well we can say that it has stopped.

  • So we need to make the sentence, "For my whole life, I had always dreamed of owning a Ferrari

  • and now I do.

  • Now that dream has come true."

  • If you'd like to learn more about how to use the past perfect tense or the future perfect

  • tense, you can click on this live lesson that I made up here a long time ago.

  • There's one full lesson about the past perfect tense and one full lesson about the present

  • perfect tense.

  • These can be tricky, so please take your time, be patient with yourself, and study them and

  • take some notes.

  • All right.

  • Let's go to the next sentence.

  • Sentence number six: not only is my Ferrari beautiful, but it is fun to drive.

  • Not only is my Ferrari beautiful, but it is fun to drive.

  • How can we make the sentence better?

  • Three, two, one.

  • Not only is my Ferrari beautiful, but it's also fun to drive.

  • We need to add the word 'also,' and our key here is the first part of that sentence uses

  • 'not only' and then the second part needs 'but also.'

  • This is an advanced phrase, 'not only, but also,' that's going to make your sentences

  • more complex.

  • Instead of just saying simple sentences, "My Ferrari's beautiful.

  • It's fun to drive," we can combine those with a beautiful advanced expression like this,

  • "Not only is my Ferrari beautiful, but it is also fun to drive."

  • We use 'not only, but also' to give some more information about something, but it's really

  • to take it to a higher level, to kind of escalate something.

  • So here, "My Ferrari's beautiful."

  • Okay, but the next level is, "Oh, it's also fun to drive.

  • On top of that, it is also fun to drive."

  • So you might say, "Not only is this lesson useful, but it is also fun."

  • I hope that this lesson is useful to you, but I hope it's not boring, I hope it's also

  • fun.

  • We're taking it to the next level.

  • All right.

  • Let's go to the next one.

  • Sentence number seven: if I crashed the car, I will cry.

  • If I crashed the car, I will cry.

  • Can you imagine this situation?

  • Spending so much money on a car, and then crashing it and that's it.

  • That would be terrible.

  • All right.

  • Let's think about what is the best way to fix this sentence.

  • Three, two, one.

  • This is a hypothetical, imaginary situation.

  • If you were listening to my quick little explanation, you might have guessed the correct answer.

  • If I crashed the car, I would cry.

  • We use 'if' plus 'would' to talk about these imaginary, hypothetical situations.

  • It's not happening right now, so