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  • [Jordy whistles]

  • No, we're not doing that.

  • No, we're not doingcome on, guys

  • No, we're not doing the disintegration effect.

  • Stop doing that.

  • No, we're not doing the disintegration effect!

  • You guys have been asking me for this for an entire year now, no!

  • Get away.

  • [Multiple popping sounds]

  • No!

  • Guys, come on, stop!

  • No, we're not doing the disintegration effect!

  • What is wrong with all of you?

  • No!

  • Alright, you win.

  • Yannick, get over here!

  • We're doing the disintegration effect.

  • [Cinecom's intro music]

  • Hey guys, it's Jordy here for cinecom.net and welcome to Copy Cat Friday,

  • the weekly series in which we recreate effects

  • from famous films and music videos.

  • And since the first Infinity Wars film got out

  • we've been getting so many comments from you guys

  • asking us to create that disintegration effect.

  • Personally, I never wanted to do it

  • because there're already some great tutorials out there

  • that I think show the effect really great.

  • I think the ones from ProductionCrate and Filmlearnin really stand out.

  • And I don't just wanna make a copy of them.

  • So, we're gonna do it a little bit different today.

  • Everyone is using a third party plugin called Trapcode.

  • It does costs some money, and although it's worth every penny,

  • we are gonna do it without.

  • The only thing you're gonna need is Adobe After Effects.

  • Now, one problem we were running into was the motion of the particles.

  • And I strongly believe that we can never get it perfect without Trapcode,

  • so we did make a disintegration effect that is fairly simply to make,

  • however it's not exactly the same as in the film.

  • But I think for everyone who's starting out with Adobe After Effects,

  • this tutorial right here is definitely gonna tackle some very nice techniques.

  • [Yannick whistles]

  • -Hey Yannick, when you're done cleaning up here,

  • could you help me out?

  • I'm trying to create this effect but I just can't get it to work.

  • -Sure. -Ah, thanks Yannick.

  • Oh yeah, before I forget, Have you seen Lorenzo somewhere?

  • -Did you check the toilet? -No, I haven't yet.

  • You know, there's this pile of dust somewhere

  • and I want him to clean it up, but I just can't find him anywhere.

  • I'll check the toilet, thanks, Yannick.

  • -Jordy!

  • So, I guess I'll just do all the work around here!

  • Where is Yannick now?

  • First Lorenzo is gone, now Yannick is gone,

  • What's with all the ashes around the office here?

  • Anyways, let's take a quick moment to thank our sponsor,

  • Storyblocks Video today.

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  • high quality studio stock clips in 4K resolution and so much more.

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  • We use it on a daily basis and can highly recommend to use it as well.

  • Definitely check it out by clicking the first link in the description below.

  • And now let's mop the floor a little bit further.

  • To make your shots, you are gonna need to shoot yourself against a green screen.

  • We actually did a tutorial a few weeks ago on how to pull the perfect green key,

  • so definitely check that out.

  • I'll leave a link to it in the description below.

  • Also take an empty shot when you're done

  • and make sure that both of the shots were done from a tripod.

  • That's it.

  • Then bring the two shots into Adobe After Effects.

  • Place your empty shot on the bottom and the green screen shot on top.

  • With the pen tool you wanna draw on the inside of the green screen

  • to get rid of the rest.

  • Finally search for the Key Light effect in your Effects Library

  • and we're gonna grab that Key Light preset

  • that also has a cleaner and a spill light remover.

  • Again, I'm pointing to our in depth video about green screens

  • where I show exactly how to get the best results with this Key Light effect.

  • After you've picked the green, it'll be keyed out,

  • which is gonna make sure that your background and the talent

  • is gonna be in a separate layer.

  • And that is exactly what we want.

  • Now we're about to work with an effect that is not super stable.

  • We've had After Effects crash several times,

  • so there're a few things we have to take in account.

  • First of all, make sure that you're working on 1080p footage.

  • The effect can't handle 4K, unfortunately.

  • If you're doing a green key, I would first do that in 4K

  • and then export it to 1080 to do the rest.

  • The second thing is that you wanna have your renderer set to Full at all time.

  • Don't ask me why, that's just how Adobe works.

  • Alright, we can now go ahead and duplicate the shot of the talent.

  • This duplication is gonna be the effect where your talent turns into brown ashes,

  • not the actual particles yet.

  • On this duplication we're gonna add a fractal noise.

  • Change the brightness and contrast so that you get a nice contrast pattern,

  • as you can see right here.

  • After that, add a Tint effect to it as well

  • and map the white color to something brown-ish.

  • The color of the ashes.

  • Finally add a Linear Wipe to the clip.

  • We're gonna use this to reveal the layer.

  • Start by animating the transition completion from 100 to 0.

  • The speed of this animation will define the speed of the disintegration as well.

  • When you're done, change the angle the way you want.

  • Of course, where you see this layer appear first

  • will also define the start of the disintegration.

  • And finally add some feather to that Linear Wipe to top it off.

  • And this is what the complete animation should look like.

  • Alright, we can now go ahead and select the two layers,

  • right click and choose precompose to group them together.

  • On this composition we're gonna add the effect called Shatter.

  • And this is that very unstable effect that I was talking about.

  • I really hope Adobe will update this effect one day

  • to be more compatible with modern hardware.

  • But anyways, let's have a look at it.

  • For starters we're going to change the view to rendered

  • so that we can actually see what we're doing.

  • For the pattern, select Glass, which is gonna give us the right texture.

  • Next increase the repetitions to around 200.

  • This will define the amount of particles.

  • Extrusion depth is gonna be to 0 as we don't want a three dimensional particle.

  • Next head into the Force.

  • The position property is gonna shatter your clip.

  • So we're gonna position that one above the starting point,

  • where we also let the Linear Wipe start.

  • The Radius defines the radius of that position point.

  • In the beginning it has to be small so that we don't see the shatter yet.

  • And then comes the strength.

  • This defines how much the particles will explode.

  • We're gonna set this to around 0.2,

  • since the disintegration will gently shatter and not explode.

  • Alright, now jump into the physics.

  • The rotation speed can be set to the max, together with the randomness.

  • And this will let the particles flow more organic as they break apart.

  • The Viscosity, if I pronounce that right, can be increased to around 0.2.

  • This will keep the particles more together.

  • We'll get back to this one in a moment.

  • The ashes of the disintegration is something very lightweight.

  • So we're gonna decrease the gravity to around 0.2.

  • Eventually, the ashes will move away

  • and you can define which direction they have to go to

  • with the gravity direction.

  • Setting it to 0 will make them go upwards.

  • And finally is the Gravity Inclination.

  • You can kinda see this as the ramping of the gravity.

  • We're increasing this to 50, which will first break the particles apart

  • and then it will slowly rise.

  • Kinda the same thing as setting an ease to a keyframe.

  • Alright, those were all the settings.

  • We can now go ahead and make the animation,

  • which actually goes very simple with this effect.

  • We don't need to create any masks or anything like that.

  • I'm going to create a Keyframe for the position, radius, viscosity and gravity.

  • Then move forward in time, try to follow your previous Linear Wipe animation.

  • Now change the position to go over your talent,

  • and at the same time, increase the radius

  • so that it shatters everything that comes in its path.

  • Finally, decrease the viscosity to 0

  • so that the particles will move a little bit more apart

  • and increase the gravity to around 0.6 to make the particles go up faster over time.

  • And when you got this right, you already have yourself a disintegration effect.

  • But of course, we can make it look better.

  • So the next steps are gonna be some fine-tuning.

  • For starters, we're gonna add some fine dust to the effect.

  • To do that, we're going to create a new solid.

  • Make sure that it is a black solid.

  • On this new layer we're going to add the Add Grain effect.

  • Change the viewing mode to Final Output and then jump into the tweaking,

  • where you wanna increase the intensity and the size to 10.

  • And then decrease the softness to around 0.02.

  • This will give you some very nice sharp grain.

  • Under Color, we're going to check monochromatic

  • and for the animation speed, set that one to 0.

  • Because we don't want the grain to move around.

  • Now, those who are wondering why we didn't simply used the Noise effect

  • to create this pattern.

  • Well, that's because we couldn't disable the animation of the grain

  • with the Noise effect.

  • Alright, this is gonna be the fine dust.

  • But we're gonna use that layer as a pattern.

  • So we can now go ahead and disable the layer output.

  • Next we're going to duplicate the layer on which we've created

  • that first disintegration effect.

  • Make sure it's on the top of your edit.

  • This also copied the entire Shatter effect with it,

  • including the animation keyframes.

  • Now, important is that you're gonna move your playhead

  • on top of the first keyframes of this layer.

  • From this point we can now change a few settings from within

  • and those keyframes will be automatically updated.

  • For starters, change the pattern to Custom.

  • And from the custom shatter map below,

  • we're going to point to that solid with the grain onto it.

  • Make sure you also select 'Effects and Masks' from the dropdown next to it.

  • The Shatter effect will now use that grain for the texture of its dust.

  • We're going to add a little bit of depth to this dust.

  • So, change the extrusion depth to 0.05.

  • Then jump into the Viscosity property and decrease that to 0.15.

  • This will make them spread a little bit more,

  • since the smaller dust is a lot more lightweight.

  • The Gravity can be increased a little to 0.4.

  • Again, finer dust is more lightweight so it has to raise quicker.

  • And finally is the Gravity Inclination,

  • which defines the start animation of the gravity.

  • On in other words, an ease on a keyframe.

  • Decrease that to 40, so that the finer dust flies up quicker.

  • And that's it!

  • The last step is to animate one property different.

  • So, move your playhead to the last batch of keyframes.

  • We're gonna update the gravity to a little bit more than what's currently set.

  • This is to add an extra acceleration to the motion of the fine dust.

  • And that's it!

  • Wow, that was pretty intense, I know.

  • But you've just created the disintegration effect from Thanos

  • without any third party plugins.

  • Optional, you could add one last element to fine tune the effect even more.

  • We're going to use a stock smoke clip.

  • You can find these on Storyblocks, for example,

  • but I will also provide one that everyone can download from a link in the description.

  • This is a smoke clip that we've shot ourselves in the studio here.

  • We've actually created an entire action elements pack,

  • which we're gonna give more information about very soon!

  • So, import this clip into Adobe After Effects

  • and place it in between the two shatter clips.

  • Then change it's blending mode to Screen

  • and reposition and scale the clip so that it sits behind the talent.

  • We're gonna animate the position and the scale to make it follow the disintegration.

  • From the first disintegration layer, you can go ahead and copy the Tint effect.

  • then paste it on the smoke to bring it into the same style and that's it!

  • -Jordy!

  • Wow, we're really killing it lately with these long tutorials!

  • But this one was on you!

  • I don't wanna hear any begging for the disintegration effect anymore as of now.

  • Alright?

  • Good!

  • Thank you so much for watching, guys, thank you Storyblocks for the support

  • and as always:

  • Stay Creative!

  • -Yannick, Hahaha!

  • When you're done cleaning up here,