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  • This video is sponsored by brilliant.org,

  • a math and science problem-solving website that helps you think more like a scientist.

  • In a 2007 graduation speech, Charlie Munger told an interesting, but fictional, story

  • about two people: the great scientist Max Planck, and his chauffeur.

  • Max was, undoubtedly, a wise scientist. The people of Germany longed to hear him speak.

  • He toured the country with his chauffeur, giving talks about his work.

  • Day after day, the chauffeur grew tired of hearing the same speech over and over again.

  • Finally, he asked, "Max, can I try giving the speech this time? I've listened to it so many times I have it memorized."

  • Max agreed to let the chauffeur give the speech. He took a seat at the front and put on the chauffeur's

  • hat. The chauffeur pretended to be Max and played the part perfectly. The speech

  • was a success. At the end, a small man rose and asked the chauffeur a question. His response?

  • That's such a

  • simple question, I'm surprised that you would ask it. I'll let my chauffeur answer it.

  • Charlie Munger told the story to highlight the difference between two kinds of knowledge: the deep knowledge that Max had and the shallow knowledge that

  • the chauffeur had. The world is overflowing with information. It's impossible to learn deeply about everything. In fact, there are benefits to having a

  • shallow understanding of ideas. For starters, it allows us to connect with other people in their area of expertise and have

  • conversations with a wide variety of people. It

  • also allows us to understand important things on the surface, which may be better than not understanding at all. In the essence of time,

  • sometimes we have to outsource our understanding to experts, but in my opinion, it's always best not to act on Information we haven't reviewed

  • ourselves if possible, because even experts can be wrong or misinformed. There are dangers associated with attaining shallow information as

  • well. The biggest is that, like the chauffeur, we risk fooling ourselves into thinking we actually understand or know something when

  • we don't. Even worse,

  • we risk taking action on misinformation or misunderstanding.

  • As Richard Feynman famously said,

  • "The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool."

  • The best way to not be a fool is to think critically and learn deeply.

  • One of the best ways to grasp a deeper understanding

  • of an idea is to utilize the Feynman Technique. There are four simple steps.

  • Step one: Explain the topic out loud to a peer who is unfamiliar with the topic. Meet them at their level of understanding

  • and use the simplest language you can.

  • Step two: Identify any gaps in your own understanding

  • or points where you feel that you can't explain an idea simply. Step three:

  • Go back to the source material and study up on your weak points until you can use simple language to explain it.

  • And then, the final step is to repeat

  • the three steps above until you've mastered the topic.

  • There are two main goals to strive for when using the Feynman Technique: be simple and concise.

  • See if you can explain the concept to a five-year-old. If you can, try to come up with an original

  • analogy to help you explain the topic.

  • Creating an analogy is a fantastic way to gain mastery over an idea and learn empathy.

  • It forces you to meet the person at their level of understanding

  • and teach them something new by relating it to an idea they're already familiar with.

  • Here's an example of an analogy: the basic structure of a story can be thought of as a pyramid

  • tension builds up to maximum and then drops. Of

  • course, there are many different ways to write a story and not all of them can be reduced to such a simple

  • structure. But the image of a pyramid conveys a lot of complex information to the student in a simple manner.

  • They Can Relate The Structure of A story

  • To a shape They're Familiar With and Have an intuitive Understanding

  • Of the Pyramid it Shows Them that There Must be Tension in A good story this is Commonly Referred to as the rising Action

  • The Tension Must Rise to a maximum Point Which Is called the Climax

  • At this Point the Tension must Fall or be Diffused We refer to this as the Falling Action

  • Creating an Analogy like This Forces me to have a Deep Enough

  • Understanding of The Topic to Relate it to an Idea The Student is Already Familiar with Any

  • "Any Intelligent Fool Can Make Things Bigger more Complex

  • And more violent it Takes A touch of genius and A lot of Courage to move in the Opposite Direction."

  • E. F. Schumacher

  • So when Should we apply the Feynman Technique to learn More Deeply?

  • I'd Argue that the two most important Places to apply it is when

  • We're Making A Life-Changing Decision

  • Or When we're Working on our Craft

  • If You want to be an Artist you Should apply it Whenever you're Making Art so that you Can Deliberately?

  • Improve if You're an Engineer you might Apply it when you're Studying or working on A technical Project the Massive

  • Advantages of using the Feynman Technique Are that it Held to develop a true Understanding of Whatever your Learning

  • Allows you to Make informed and intelligent Decisions Applying your Knowledge to Real-World Problems Becomes much Easier

  • your Teaching skills Improved and your

  • Capacity to Think Critically About a topic is Increased the only Trade-Off is Time and Effort even then the Time you invest upfront is more

  • Than Returned Later on This Technique was Named After Richard Feynman a nobel Prize-Winning

  • Physicist in His Biography on Richard Feynman James Gleick Said that Richard

  • Would Create a journal for the things he?

  • Did not know his Discipline and Challenging his Own Understanding Made him a genius and a Brilliant

  • Scientist now that you know, his secret I'm excited for you to step Into your own Greatness

  • Like the Feynman Technique Brilliant.org, also Follows a simple yet effective Structure That helps you guys Learn and Grow

  • Brilliant is a math and science Problem-Solving Website and it's relevant for Any Person who wants to get Ahead in Finance

  • Programming Engineering Or someone who Just wants to think more like A scientist

  • My Favorite Course Right Now is Physics of the everyday which like it sounds Show Us how the

  • Principles of Physics Are Applied to things

  • We experience in everyday life?

  • Brilliant Mirrors The Structure of The Fineman Technique You start by Thinking Through

  • Interesting Puzzles in A guided sequence Which Is one of the most effective Ways to identify the gaps in your Own Understanding

  • When you get Stuck you Can Look up the Solution to Brush up on your Weak Points

  • It's really A fun way to learn and to better Yourself so i highly recommend Checking it out

  • Just go to brilliant.org/freedominthought

  • Or click the link in The Description Below and you Can sign up for free as a Bonus for Those

  • Who want to get Ahead the first 200 People will be hooked up with

  • 20% off The annual Subscription as Always Thanks for Watching and I'll see you guys next Time

This video is sponsored by brilliant.org,

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如何更有效地學習|費曼技術(The Feynman Technique) (How to Study Way More Effectively | The Feynman Technique)

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    Yifan Liu 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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