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  • We're heading into the grocery store to go shopping for some fruits for a fruits vocabulary video.

  • 00:00:13,940 --> 00:00:18,280 Delicious-looking watermelon.

  • There's a good one.

  • Okay, so I didn't get too much footage in the store

  • but did you hear what that melon was called?

  • It's called watermelon.

  • Probably my favorite melon.

  • Watermelon is a compound word and with compound words, we put stress on the first word.

  • In this case, it's the word water.

  • That's actually a pretty tough word and I have a whole fun video on how to pronounce that word.

  • I'll be sure to put a link to that video at the end of this one.

  • We have a Flap T in 'water', then the word 'melon'.

  • There's secondary stress on 'mel'.

  • So the main stress is on wa—.

  • Watermelon.

  • Don't let that ON ending fool you. It's a schwa.

  • Un, un, un.

  • Said very quickly.

  • Watermelon.

  • Watermelon.

  • Try that with me.

  • Watermelon.

  • Delicious-looking watermelon.

  • There's a good one.

  • We actually bought a bunch of fruits and took them home

  • so let's go back to my Kitchen.

  • But first, let's take a look at the word 'fruit'.

  • It has the FR consonant Cluster: frr, frr, then the OO vowel: frooand the T.

  • The ending T will be a Stop T if it's at the end of a thought group

  • or followed by a consonant.

  • Fruit.

  • Fruit.

  • It will be a Flap T if it links into a vowel or diphthong.

  • Fruit infruit inrararafruit infruit in the salad.

  • Apple.

  • Apple.

  • Apple.

  • We have 2 letter Ps in this word but together, they make just one P sound.

  • The second syllable is unstressed and it's just the dark L.

  • Uhl, uhl.

  • Apple.

  • Apple.

  • For the stressed vowel AH, you may find you pronounce it better

  • if you lift your upper lip just a little Bit.

  • Ah.

  • Back of the tongue should be lifted.

  • Apple.

  • Say it with me.

  • Apple.

  • Apple.

  • Apple.

  • David ate our last banana so here's a photo of a banana.

  • Banana.

  • This word is filled with 3 A's

  • but we don't pronounce them all the same way because of syllable stress.

  • The stressed syllable in this word is the second one.

  • Naaaa.

  • Which has the AH as in bat vowel sound.

  • Banana.

  • Because the AH vowel comes before the nasal consonant N, it's not a pure AH vowel.

  • We'll relax it into the vowel before N: banaaa

  • banaaabanaaanbanana.

  • The other two syllables are unstressed and use the schwa.

  • BanabanannaBanana.

  • Say that with me.

  • Banana.

  • David ate our last banana. So here's a photo of a Banana.

  • Blackberry, strawberry, blueberry.

  • Not pictured, raspberry.

  • So here, we have three berries.

  • Berry is a two-syllable word with stress on the first syllable.

  • It has the EH vowel followed by R.

  • This sound combination is tricky because the R changes EH a little bit.

  • We don't have as much jaw drop as we would for a pure EH vowel.

  • EhAir.

  • Bear.

  • BeaEh.

  • You can see I'm dropping my jaw more for the pure Vowel.

  • Berry.

  • Berry.

  • I mentioned four kinds of berries.

  • Blackberry, strawberry, blueberry.

  • Not pictured, raspberry.

  • Blackberry, Strawberry, Blueberry, and Raspberry.

  • These are all four compound Words.

  • With compound words, stress is always on the first word.

  • Black, blue, straw, rasp.

  • Blackberry.

  • Blueberry.

  • In all four of these three syllable words, the first syllable is stressed.

  • Blackberry.

  • Strawberry.

  • Blueberry.

  • Raspberry.

  • Notice the P in raspberry is silent.

  • We don't say it at all.

  • Say these with me: blackberry, strawberry, Blueberry, raspberry.

  • Blackberry, Strawberry, blueberry.

  • Not pictured, Raspberry.

  • A similar word to 'berry' is 'pear'.

  • Bear.

  • Pear.

  • I didn't get a video clip of a pear but this is a picture of a pear.

  • Sometimes we use the term pear-shaped to describe a body.

  • Bigger through the thighs and hips and more tapered up top.

  • Pear.

  • Pear is just like bear except the first sound is unvoiced.

  • Instead of voiced.

  • Bbb

  • pear.

  • Pear.

  • Less jaw drop than we would have for a pure EH.

  • Pear.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • We took video of in the Store, pictures of.

  • I couldn't find that video of the cantaloupe so here's an Image.

  • It has that rough skin and that sweet soft orange meat inside.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • This is a word that will teach you not to trust English spelling.

  • The first syllable is stressed.

  • It uses the AH as in bat vowel.

  • Just like with banana, it's not a pure AH because it's followed by N.

  • Caaah, ah.

  • Relax the back of the tongue, we get that AH sound.

  • Caaah.

  • CanCantaloupe.

  • You probably noticed I'm not pronouncing the T.

  • Like in the words 'interview' and 'intermission', the T is often dropped after N.

  • You just pronounce the N.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • You can make the True T: cantaloupe, cantaloupe,

  • but listen to how I said it in the kitchen when I wasn't thinking about pronunciation.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • We took video of in the store, pictures of.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • I dropped the T.

  • The spelling of the last syllable can also cause confusion.

  • This is the OH as in No diphthong and the final E is silent.

  • Lope.

  • Lope.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • Try that with me.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • Cantaloupe.

  • We took video of in the store, pictures of.

  • Cherries.

  • Not to be confused with a cherry tomato.

  • Cherries.

  • Cherry this is just like berry except it starts with the CH consonant,

  • chcherry.

  • Two syllables with stress on the first syllable.

  • CherThe first syllable sounds just like a chair you sit in.

  • Cherchercherry.

  • Say that with me.

  • Cherry.

  • Cherries.

  • Not to be confused with a cherry tomato.

  • Cherries.

  • I talked about a cherry tomato.

  • That's a kind of tomato that's small like a cherry.

  • We'll go over the pronunciation of 'tomato' later when we study vegetable vocabulary in another video.

  • You know, I didn't get a good video of grapes.

  • We have green grapes, and red grapes, and also concord grapes.

  • Grapes can have seeds or not.

  • Grapes has the GR cluster.

  • Lip position doesn't matter for the G, so your lips will already be rounding for the R.

  • Grr, grr, gra

  • AI diphthong, PS cluster.

  • Grapes.

  • Grapes.

  • Red, green, both of these begin with the R or an R cluster so again, lip rounding.

  • Red, green, grapes.

  • Red grapes.

  • Green grapes.

  • Concord grapes make great juice, great jams, and I even have a great pie recipe for concord grapes.

  • Stress is on the first syllable.

  • K consonant, AW vowel, then the NG sound.

  • Concord.

  • The letter N is usually pronounced as NG when it's followed by G or K.

  • So the back of the tongue lifts to touch the soft palate to make the NG sound.

  • Concord.

  • Then a quick unstressed syllable, K sound, schwa R.

  • Cord, cord, cord.

  • Concord.

  • Concord grape.

  • Red grapes.

  • Green grapes.

  • Concord grapes.

  • Say these with me.

  • Red grapes.

  • Green grapes.

  • Concord grapes.

  • I have an orange and a grapefruit.

  • Let's slice them open.

  • Not pictured, tangerine.

  • There are actually lots of different citrus fruits, aren't there?

  • Oops.

  • Too many to put in one video about fruits.

  • Okay, so here you can really see the difference.

  • First of all size, but the grapefruit is that beautiful pink color inside and then orange is more orange.

  • Orange, grapefruit, tangerine, citrus.

  • Orange.

  • This word is known for having nothing that rhymes with it.

  • It's pronounced with the AW as in law vowel.

  • And when that's followed by R, it's not pure.

  • We round the lips more, we pull the tongue back more.

  • Or, orrrr.

  • The second syllable is unstressed and said quickly.

  • Orrr, ange, ange, ange, ange, ange, ange.

  • Super fast IH vowel, N, and then a J sound.

  • Orrrr, ihnj.

  • Orange.

  • Say that with me.

  • Orange.

  • I have an orange and a grapefruit.

  • Grapefruit.

  • A compound word of two words we've already studied.

  • Grape and fruit.

  • Do you remember what we said about stress in compound words?

  • It's the first word that's stressed.

  • So, grape.

  • Grapefruit.

  • P is a stop consonant and we usually don't release stop consonants when followed by another consonant.

  • Grapefruit.

  • Notice my Lips came together for the P but I didn't ppp

  • release the air before going to the F.

  • Grapefruit.

  • Grapefruit.

  • Say that with me.

  • Grapefruit.

  • I have an orange and a grapefruit.

  • Let's slice them open.

  • Not pictured, tangerine.

  • Tangerine.

  • A three syllable word with stress on the last syllable.

  • Tangerine.

  • So the first two syllables are said a little more simply.

  • Tanger.

  • Tanger.

  • Tanger.

  • Tangerine.

  • Tanger.

  • When the a vowel is followed by N like in this first syllable, remember it's not pure,

  • taah, taah, taaan, tanger, tanger, tanger, tangerine.

  • Tangerine.

  • Tangerine.

  • Tangerine.

  • Say that with me.

  • Tangerine.

  • Tangerine.

  • Let's slice them open.

  • Not Pictured, tangerine.

  • There are actually lots of different citrus fruits.

  • Citrus.

  • The S sound is in there twice, at the beginning, and the end.

  • Once it's made with the letter C, and once with a letter S.

  • In the middle, we have the TR cluster.

  • It's pretty common to turn the T into a CH in the TR cluster.

  • Do you hear a CH?

  • Citrus.

  • Ch

  • Citchcitch

  • Citrus.

  • Citrus.