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  • Chances are, you have your favorite, go-to birthday cake

  • but how about enjoying the one everyone was eating on the day you were born?

  • Let's take a walk down memory lane and look at all the biggest, best, and most popular cakes that have trended over the years.

  • So, what was the most popular cake the year you were born?

  • 1948-1956: Chiffon cake

  • A light, dairy-free cake that looks a lot like Angel Food, Chiffon has the same spongy texture,

  • but this cake is made with both egg whites and yolks, along with fruit juice.

  • Invented by a guy with the perfect name of Harry Baker, Chiffon cake was popularized in 1948 after he sold the recipe to Betty Crocker.

  • 1957-1960: German chocolate cake

  • German chocolate cake isn't actually German, says NPR, and was instead named for Sam German, the creator of a sweet baking chocolate aptly called German's Chocolate.

  • Even though the chocolate hit the market in 1852, it wasn't until 1957 that it became hugely popular when a Texas baker sent her chocolate cake recipe to a Dallas newspaper.

  • German's sweet baking chocolate was the key ingredient, and the cake was so popular their sales rose around 73 percent.

  • 1961-1965: Pink champagne cake

  • Chocolate cakes made with cola have been popular across the southern US for decades,

  • but in the beginning of the 1960s it was the West Coast's pink champagne cake that rose to the top.

  • The layers of this sweet, light cake were usually separated by a layer of coconut or

  • Bavarian cream then covered in fondant, for a delicious, unique flavor.

  • 1966: Tunnel of Fudge cake

  • In 1966, America was all about the decadent Tunnel of Fudge cake, which popularized Nordic

  • Ware's Bundt baking pan.

  • The pan was almost discontinued by the company until Houston's Ella Helfrich used it for

  • her Pillsbury Bake-Off competition cake in 1966.

  • Her Tunnel of Fudge cakewith its chocolate-nut, Bundt-shaped cake and fudgy middlecame

  • in second, but it became so popular, Nordic Ware was making 30,000 Bundt pans a day to

  • keep up with demand.

  • 1967-1971: Carrot cake

  • Carrot cake got a major boost in the late 1960s when the cream cheese frosting we know

  • and love today became the go-to topping.

  • And let's be honest hereit's the frosting that makes it.

  • Couple that with an increasingly health-conscious country, and carrot cake surged in popularity.

  • It stayed near the top for years, too, because the carrots make it healthy, right?

  • "So you're getting carrot cake?

  • Isn't that a little cliche?

  • Rabbits?

  • Carrots?"

  • 1972-1973: Sock-it-to-me cake

  • The 1970s' Sock-it-to-me cake was a kind of coffee cake, and it looked pretty boring from

  • the outside.

  • Cut into it, though, and you'll find a layer of brown sugar, cinnamon, and pecan filling.

  • The main draw, though, seemed to be simply that the name was a pop culture reference

  • to one of the biggest shows on television at the time, Laugh-In.

  • "Sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me, sock it to me."

  • "Sock it to yourself."

  • "Sock it to me?"

  • 1974: The Watergate cake

  • Some events define an era, and Watergate was one of those events.

  • It was so earth-shattering that it even spawned a dessert, a white cake colored bright green

  • with the help of club soda and pistachio Jell-O. Sounds weird?

  • It totally was, and it was also massively popular around the time of President Nixon's

  • resignation.

  • According to Atlas Obscura, it was defined as a cake hiding a ton of nuts beneath a heavy

  • cover-up of icing, and it was timely.

  • At least the Watergate cake usually came with a sweet center.

  • 1975-1977: Jell-O poke cakes

  • Jell-O was huge in the 70's, and the invention of the Jell-O cake put it over the top.

  • Integrating the cake and the Jell-O only requires poking some holes in the cake and pouring

  • in the Jell-O.

  • It's both simple and tasty, so it's no wonder this slightly psychedelic cake was so popular.

  • 1978-1983: Hummingbird cake

  • A light cake filled with the sweet flavors of banana and pineapple, hummingbird cake

  • hit the big time with the February 1978 issue of Southern Living.

  • That's when Mrs. LH Wiggins' recipe was published, and for decades, it's remained their most

  • requested recipe.

  • 1984-1987: Tiramisu

  • The origins of Tiramisu are shrouded in mystery, and so is its sudden rise to fame as America's

  • favorite cake of the 80's.

  • The word "tiramisu" first appeared in print in 1982, and the first recipe for the spongy,

  • chocolately, espresso infused cake was published in 1983.

  • Within a year, tiramisu was a national craze, right up there with leg warmers and Cabbage

  • Patch Kids, only much, much tastier.

  • 1988: Chocolate praline layer cake

  • In 1988, Pillsbury Bake-Off competition introduced another star to the dessert world with the

  • chocolate praline layer cake.

  • Julie Bengtson's recipe for a Devil's food cake layered with sugary pecans and whipped

  • cream proved that boxed cake mix definitely doesn't have to be boring, and that layered

  • cakes don't have to be difficult.

  • No wonder it was a massive hit!

  • 1989-1990: Funfetti

  • In 1989, Pillsbury did something revolutionary: they put rainbow sprinkles in the cake batter

  • itself, instead of just on top.

  • It's a pretty simple idea, but according to The New York Times, Funfetti kicked off a

  • craze that defined 1990s cakes.

  • Hey, it's got "fun" right in the name, so you know it's good!

  • 1991-1994: Chocolate lava cake

  • Hard to believe, but once upon a time, nobody had ever heard of chocolate lava cake.

  • That changed in the early 90's when this warm chocolate cake with a gooey center became

  • what chef Sherry Yard calls "the viral dessert of the 90s."

  • It soon spread from coast to coast, and now just about every mid-priced restaurant in

  • America offers it as a delicious dessert option.

  • 1995: Viennetta

  • In 1995 you couldn't turn on the television without seeing commercials for Breyer's Viennetta.

  • Eater called it "the most distinguished ice cream cake of the 90s", and it definitely

  • was.

  • Unfortunately, these days you have to go overseas to discover the decadence of mid-90's ice

  • cream cake, as Vienetta is no longer widely available in America.

  • But we think it's worth the trip.

  • 1996-1999: Red velvet

  • According to food historian Kim Severson, red velvet dates back to the 19th century,

  • with the red part just a gimmick to sell more food coloring.

  • But the recipe took off after a cameo appearance in the 1989 film Steel Magnolias and led to

  • a new version of the cake being introduced by New York City's Magnolia Bakery in 1996.

  • Red velvet everything became the rage.

  • Our taste buds thank you, Shirley Maclaine!

  • 2000: Anything in cupcake form

  • The Magnolia Bakery also helped turn cupcakes into a national obsession after the delicious

  • treat was featured in an episode of Sex and the City.

  • Not everyone was a fan, though, as some felt the fad drove quirkier foods out in favor

  • of chasing the latest hot trend.

  • But heycupcakes!

  • 2001-2007: Bacon cakes

  • According to the National Pork Board, bacon sales jumped 25% in 2001, and we haven't looked

  • back since.

  • With recipes for maple bacon cakes, bacon and blueberry cakes, bourbon bacon cakes,

  • and cakes filled with brown sugar and bacony goodness, bacon reigned for years in a delicious

  • dictatorship of savory goodness.

  • 2008: Anything in cake pop form

  • Thanks to social media, it's all about the trends.

  • Cakes gave way to cupcakes, and in 2008, blogger Angie Dudley, better known to some as Bakerella,

  • created the cake pop.

  • After Dudley appeared on The Martha Stewart Show to demonstrate her genius invention,

  • cake pops became a national obsession, turning her book Cake Pops: Tips, Tricks, and Recipes

  • for More than 40 Irresistible Mini Treats into a New York Times bestseller.

  • Our review: yum!

  • Thanks for watching!

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  • Plus check out all this cool stuff we know you'll love, too!

Chances are, you have your favorite, go-to birthday cake

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最受歡迎的蛋糕 你出生的那一年 (The Most Popular Cake The Year You Were Born)

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    Amy.Lin 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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