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  • Okay, James. Product placement right about now. Apple Computers, take one. Hi. James

  • from EngVid. Yeah. We're getting sponsored by Apple. "Sponsored" means someone is paying

  • you to do something. No, it's not the case. And just so you know, this is the cheap version

  • that's old. One of you guys made a guess last time I held it up. You're like, "It's the

  • Apple 5 with retinal scan!" I don't even know what that is, so don't ask me. Okay? So -- but

  • Mr. E and I, we get to work on my computer, and we're going to tell a story. Mr. E, ready?

  • Okay. So "Mr. E helped to blank blank my new computer. It's not new. It something something

  • well, and we finished early. However, it something something Mr. E had forgotten to pay his electric

  • bill, so the power was something something -- wow, a lot of 'something somethings'. We

  • sat in the -- excuse me. We sat in the dark" -- stop. The end. This is a stupid story.

  • I'm going to try and do a better story. Mr. E, help me, okay? Now, Mr. E -- first of all,

  • I should tell you what this is about. I'm giving you five phrasal verbs that are commonly

  • used in conversation that will help you have, you know, a more interesting conversation,

  • but not just that. Because these are used commonly in conversation, you can understand

  • what people are saying because I'm going to try and teach you not just one --no sirree

  • Bob! We're having a sale today. James's sale -- you're going to get two for the price of

  • one meaning, so you can understand this story, but when you're done, you can go back and

  • actually build your own stories or usages, okay? So let's go to the beginning.

  • "Mr. E helped me to something at my new computer." Well laptops are different. You just put it

  • in a room. In the old days and even now, some people buy big computers, and they have speakers

  • and they have the box and, you know, the big screen. And you have to put it somewhere.

  • Well, when you put it somewhere, you know, you want to arrange or build a system. We

  • call that a "set up". You set it up. It means to put it or arrange it in a way you can use

  • it. You "set up" a business, right? It's a system, you know. You know you buy; you sell

  • -- it's a system. So setting something up is to arrange it or organize it or build a

  • thing that you can use. That's one definition, "set up". What's the second one?" To place

  • somebody in an awkward situation". Interesting. Sometimes you're watching the movies -- I'm

  • sure you watch many of them -- someone will say, "He set me up that so-and-so." Well,

  • what it means is they knew something about the person; they pretended they didn't know;

  • then, they got other people to come around to expose or get the truth out. That's called

  • a "setup". The police "set up" criminals all the time, right? They pretend to buy drugs.

  • They pretend, but they don't actually want to buy them. The criminal sells them, and

  • then they catch them. And they say, "It was a setup from the beginning", and the police

  • go, "Yeah, and you fell for it." When you "fall" for something, you believe it's true

  • even though it's not, okay? So "set up" here means two things: to arrange a system; that's

  • one thing, and that's what we did with my computer system. It's not an awkward situation.

  • We've arranged and built a system, right? So let's set up. Let's go back. Mr. E helped

  • me to set up my new computer. That means we put it on a table, got the speakers, plugged

  • it in, made it work. Cool, right? Next, "It w___ o___ well and we finished early."

  • "W___ o___ well" -- what could that be? W-o, w-o. Well, look. See this other arrow comes

  • down here. What does that mean? Well, it means fix a problem -- or couples fix a relationship

  • -- and come to a successful end. Well, what we're talking about is work because when you

  • have a problem you must work, right? To come to a successful end means you must do some

  • work first to come to the end. Running a race; making dinner; fixing a problem. Fixing a

  • problem requires work. Couples have to work on a relationship. And we also have this "this

  • worked out". And if you're like Arnold Schwarzenegger, you have big muscles because you work out.

  • That's my best Arnold impersonation. Okay, so Arnold works out, but that's different.

  • So we also say -- and I should've put it here -- "go to gym", right? Because a lot of times

  • I hear foreign students say, "Teacher, we go exercising now." And I always go, "[laugh]

  • You go exercise. Right." North Americans, English speakers, they "work out". That's

  • what we do when we go to the gym. It is exercising, but that's our word. Be here we say, "It worked

  • out well". Now, setting up a computer could be a problem. We want to fix that problem,

  • and we can also say, "Look, it came to a successful end." I said, "It worked out well." Right?

  • That means it was good, so it would be this one, "worked out". Oops. It "walked" out.

  • We're not making food here. "Worked out well -- it worked out well, and we finished early."

  • So it came to a successful end early. Okay? Cool? All right. So now, let's look at the

  • next one. "However" -- "however" means, like, "but".

  • What's wrong? "However, it something out Mr. E. Had forgotten to pay his electric bill."

  • Forget -- you know "electricity"? From the thunderstorms? Well, electricity for your

  • lights. Didn't pay the electric bill. So what happened? "It something." Let's go up in the

  • arrows. We have here: "unknown knowledge" or "quantity produced". Unknown knowledge?

  • We say this: If something "turns out", it means you didn't know this before, but you

  • just learned about it. "It turns out Mr. E is a soldier in the Israeli army. Hmm. Didn't

  • know that, did you? Hmm. Hmm. Hmm. You thought he was just a worm. Turns out you didn't know

  • anything, did you?" No. But that's what I mean. It was knowledge you didn't have. So

  • when you say, "it turns out he was 15 minutes late", people didn't know this; they found

  • out afterwards. Unknown knowledge. The next is "quantity produced". EngVid -- I

  • feel like I'm on TV now. Ready? EngVid turns out one video per week, and we've been doing

  • so for four years -- three years, sorry. I'm joking. Sorry, I've been corrected by Mr.

  • E. "EngVid turns out three videos per week. They are an established business." So it means

  • they "produce" -- you "make" or "create" something over a period of time. If you "turn out" four

  • books, it means you "write" four books maybe in a month or a week; they will tell you.

  • A business "turns out" a million cars a year, then you know they make a million, cool?

  • So, turns out -- you like this, right? So we go here: "It turns out -- unknown knowledge,

  • right? Not quantity -- turns out Mr. E had forgotten to pay his electric bill, so the

  • power was" -- was what? Well, what's the arrow for this? Where are you? So we go over here.

  • I feel like Batman -- "Where are you?" Sorry. Okay. So it means "to be stopped" or "when

  • driving, somebody goes in front of you". You know when you're driving -- some of you drive,

  • and then somebody suddenly goes like this. You put on the brakes. You say, "I was something".

  • Well, it's like "cut". When you cut something -- I cut with my pen. See it's cut off. Stopped.

  • So in this way, this one is "cut off", okay? "Cut off" is "to be stopped". Someone can

  • cut you off from speaking, like now. See? I was cut off. Or when driving, somebody goes

  • in front of you, all right? So you got "cut off". There's another one. This is a bad one,

  • so people who aren't 18, please leave the room. If your woman "cuts you off", it means

  • no more [makes clicking sound] -- okay? Guys never cut women off from this reason, so if

  • you can't figure it out, you must be 16 and you're still in the room. I told you to leave.

  • Okay. People under 18, come back. All right. So "cut off" is one and two and number three.

  • All right? Cool. All right, so what happened to the power?

  • The power was cut off. Remember that means "to be stopped", so the power was "cut off".

  • If someone "cuts you off" -- remember they can cut you off from speaking -- you go: "And

  • I was about to" -- "Blah, blah, blah." "Don't cut me off! I need to speak."

  • And finally, "C___ u___": learn about what has happened in the past. Okay. What does

  • that mean? Well, look. We're sitting here. The lights are off. There's nothing going

  • on. We both got beer -- or cerveza, my only Spanish word. We're drinking, and I go, "Hey,

  • what happened last year? I didn't see you for a long time." He says, "Hey, I meant to

  • catch up with you." "Catch up". What was that? I'm hiding it. You can't see it just yet.

  • And through the magic of television, "We sat in the dark to -- we sat in the dark catching

  • up." There; -ing. So what does that mean? That means we were talking about what happened

  • before. What happened last year? I didn't see you. Give me all the information so we

  • can be at the same place now, and I can say, "And that's what I did for the whole year."

  • Well, that's the lesson I've taught you, so let's go over this quickly, okay?

  • Because we've learned five phrasal verbs that, if you pay attention now, you're going to

  • start seeing a lot when people speak. I mean, the "working out" for the gym you hear all

  • the time -- North America especially because we like looking good, so we work out all the

  • time. But "set up" -- you might say, "I need to set up a business or set up a bank account."

  • Right? To start something, right? Arrange or build a system. Or "this was a set up from

  • the first place." It wasn't a good situation. I feel bad because "awkward" means "not comfortable".

  • Someone put me in an uncomfortable situation. "Work out": "We need to work out the problem

  • if we're going to set up this business effectively." Right? So we need to fix the problem. "I hope

  • the couple works it out." We hope they fix their relationship. And you can say, "It worked

  • out in the end. The party was great, so everything came to a successful end." What's the next

  • one? "Turn out": "Turns out that if you work out things and you set it up in the first

  • place, you'll be successful." I used three of them all in the same, right? "But it turns

  • out I actually know Brad Pitt." No, I don't know Brad Pitt, but it turns out you don't

  • know him either, but you didn't know that. Or how much you produce -- quantity produced.

  • Next one, we took up "cut off". When you're driving, if someone goes in front of you suddenly,

  • you can say, "He cut me off. That's why the accident happened." Right? Or you can say,

  • "cut off": "Someone stopped me from speaking. I tried to tell him that it was a problem,

  • but he cut me off." See? There you go. And finally -- this is my favorite part. I like

  • catching up with you guys for these visits, you know, fireside chats. "Fireside" means

  • sit by the fire and talk. Catching up is my favorite part of the day with you. We can

  • do it again if you come to www.engvid.com, where "eng" stands for "English", and "vid"

  • stands for "video", where myself, Mr. E -- I'm sweating. We've got to do some catching up.

  • It's been a while. He's been on that board for at least an hour now. Bye everybody. See

  • you later. Let's set something up. Maybe we come back next week, yeah? You like that?

  • I don't know. We'll work it out. Turns out, I've got next Friday off. Come see me. Chao.

Okay, James. Product placement right about now. Apple Computers, take one. Hi. James

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【英文技巧】五種對話常用的片語動詞,你一定要會! (5 conversation phrasal verbs you need to know)

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    Chihyu Lin 發佈於 2015 年 01 月 06 日
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