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  • Many of you have questions about British English vs. American English.

  • Today we're going to tackle the question of the pronunciation of this word:

  • should it be 'neither' or 'neither' in American English?

  • What's the American English and British English pronunciation?

  • 00:00:25,640 --> 00:00:29,260 I got an email from someone who watches my videos a while back,

  • and he said, “please stop mispronouncing 'neither'.

  • Please stop saying it the British way.”

  • And I thought, what is he talking about?

  • Is this one of the American English and British English differences?

  • I didn't think so.

  • My whole life I've been saying bothneitherandneither

  • and I never thought anything of it.

  • I did a little looking and I found that there's actually a misconception out there

  • about the pronunciation of 'neither' and 'either' in American English vs. British English.

  • The idea is that saying EE, 'neither' or 'either'

  • with the EE as in SHE vowel is American,

  • and saying 'neither' or 'either' with the AI diphthong is the British pronunciation.

  • There's not a British pronunciation and an American pronunciation

  • when it comes to the vowel or diphthong sound in the stressed syllable.

  • There may have been at one time,

  • but they have been blended, and now both are used in both British and American English.

  • And if you're not sure if you want to believe this, keep watching,

  • we're going to go to Youglish and find many examples of

  • these words in both British English and American English.

  • We're going to do the research together

  • to look at how frequent each pronunciation is

  • in American English and British English.

  • But first, there is a difference in American English and British English pronunciation for these words

  • that doesn't have to with the stressed syllable, but the unstressed syllable.

  • Let's go to Youglish and find an example of each for the word 'neither'.

  • So we'll go to Youglish.com.

  • Do you know this resource?

  • It's a great way to see how different people pronounce the same word.

  • So I can type in any word or phrase, today, we're studying:

  • neither, neither.

  • I'll type it in and I'll choose US.

  • This will bring up a bunch of options where

  • someone that this system thinks is American is saying this word.

  • And we can skip through and we can see hundreds of different people saying the same word or phrase.

  • Something I just discovered recently, is down here.

  • There's a speed controller so you can play at normal speed, slower, or faster.

  • Playing at a slower speed might be great for you as you're studying pronunciation.

  • it's a pretty powerful tool.

  • I definitely recommend you use it.

  • now, let's go get that example for neither.

  • first, American English.

  • actually, I messed that up.

  • we're not going to look at 'neither' we're going to look at 'either'.

  • so we're looking at the last syllable here and it's the same in both neither and either.

  • first, let's listen to the American pronunciation.

  • Step of your life...

  • There's no rule either at how fast you have to read them or what pace...

  • And now let's listen to the British pronunciation of 'either' looking at the final syllable.

  • Things which mainstream politicians were either unable or unwilling to say.

  • They're a little different in the ending.

  • Listen again a couple of times to the two pronunciations.

  • Either.

  • Either.

  • Either.

  • Either.

  • Either.

  • Either.

  • In American English, schwa R is pronounced as an R sound.

  • Either.

  • Er. Er. Er.

  • Either.

  • Never.

  • Wonder.

  • Mother.

  • Er. Er. Er.

  • Always er--.

  • But in British English, it's not really an R sound:

  • err.

  • It's more of a schwa sound:

  • uh.

  • So rather than:

  • either, er, it's more like:

  • either, uh, er, uh, er.

  • The ER ending is treated differently in American English versus British English.

  • but as far as what vowel we use in 'either' or 'neither' it doesn't matter

  • they both sound natural in both accents.

  • How often is one pronunciation used as opposed to another?

  • Let's go back to Youglish to see.

  • We're going to listen to examples until we get to ten for either of these pronunciations.

  • I'll keep track of how many of each pronunciation we hear in the side bars.

  • First, Americans saying: either, either.

  • Idea of technology should either be invisible or beautiful...

  • Step of your life...

  • There's no rule either at how fast you have to read them or what pace...

  • Technical theater classes either way are going to give you...

  • Or design. But either way I'd have it and it would come and go, then I'd come back...

  • Of realism and we wouldn't get anything done either. So what...

  • Either on a local level, on a state level...

  • To a decision, you actually have to make a choice. You either continue...

  • That you never disagree with. If you want you can go find people either online or...

  • Which means either labor markets need to change...

  • Regulatory changes providing more leeway to the states

  • so that they did not have the either requirement or the incentive...

  • And she never allowed us to give up hope either. This brutal...

  • Rescue either someone they love...

  • Had either acted up in school, went somewhere you're specifically told to stay out...

  • Okay, at the end, we have either coming in 10 times

  • and either coming in 3 times.

  • Now, this is a small sample but it looks like the EE pronunciation is more common in American English.

  • But I can't stress it enough.

  • Both sound perfectly fine and perfectly natural in American English.

  • No one is sitting in the audience thinking:

  • He just used the British English pronunciation!

  • No.

  • They both sound perfectly natural.

  • Now, you may be wondering when should I use which pronunciation?

  • Doesn't matter.

  • If you want to choose one and stick with it, fine.

  • If the other one slips out, it doesn't matter.

  • It's all the same to us.

  • Do you know what?

  • While I'm thinking of it, let me remind you to subscribe to my channel if you haven't already.

  • I make new English videos every Tuesday.

  • A great resource if you're studying English as a foreign language.

  • We're going to get you comfortable speaking American English.

  • Let's keep going and look at British English for the word 'either'.

  • Face rather an unpleasant choice. It's almost as though either you accept the doctrine...

  • He slung braces of pistols on either shoulder, he...

  • The starts and then the first player has a choice of either just sticking with the...

  • So this is either with their cooperative learning networks or the whole education movement or the school...

  • Harmful agents not completely benign but then, caffeine isn't completely benign either. Nicotine--

  • He knows most of those that you either use or have had used

  • either for business purposes or for leisure purposes...

  • It could go either way and the best way we can help our readers...

  • Isn't one of the 49% either so...

  • Either contributing to or detracting from the understanding we're trying to create.

  • Don't like either those words...

  • With hindsight appears to actually, you know, appear either naive or highly unlikely, no, of course not...

  • Before either of our two countries were members of the European Union

  • Were either unable or unwilling to say that you...

  • Okay, at the end, we reached ten pronunciations for AI and three for EE.

  • A small sample but it looks like the AI pronunciation might be more common in British English.

  • Let's go to 'neither'.

  • I found that the numbers are a little closer here.

  • And blockchain is kind of neither of those things right now...

  • System is neither fair nor efficient. Look at the--

  • Impulse control doesn't really describe your family's life in the book and neither does delayed gratification...

  • Are they neither some mix of the two...

  • Or you can have neither. So Belmont may ask...

  • Whether we should make America Europe again or make America 1950 again.

  • right? neither of these are very interesting.

  • The moral argument. the moral argument is that in neither case, deprivation related deficits...

  • Neither had national borders before the Soviet Union.

  • And more importantly neither does the taxpayer. The lottery is doing well...

  • Neither political party in the united states has addressed it...

  • This is neither sustainable from a public health nor...

  • But uh, neither are the oakland raiders, you know, which are very close here...

  • It was amazing and and I got to say, neither of us have done it but it was in that big...

  • Here today because neither their ideas nor their bullets can win and now...

  • Neither country wants to go to a nuclear war, of course...

  • I had no idea where my life was going, neither does she, you know...

  • In time, now neither being like green in space nor...

  • September. I'm sure thirty years ago neither one of them thought that they would end up writing a book.

  • Assure you at this point, we have neither any plan to

  • dissolve one of our strongest programs nor would we do...

  • Almost tied.

  • What about British English?

  • The situation where neither player over time would expect..

  • And neither could he when he saw what the surreals were about...

  • Neither did the Romans...

  • NTlive was neither to be quite theater nor certainly film...

  • Character that really can only develop in an environment in which neither of us can quit the room

  • And neither today. It's about something else.

  • Now neither of these spaces is regularly seen...

  • Wonderful happens, you know, and that neither of them is entirely able to function without the other.

  • Neither is it true that in the modern world

  • I think neither of which will work, so for me...

  • Neither is not having an engine connection... I mentioned peop--

  • Neither is it easy to see through the sometimes manipulative...

  • Neither wine nor cigars... William had to...

  • It's not a socialist to play neither is it an anti-socialist play.

  • Neither of course, because they both were...

  • Five to ten, AI being more common.

  • Still, I want to stress, both pronunciations are common enough to sound perfectly natural

  • in British English and American English.

  • Now, if you are curious about American English and British English pronunciation differences,

  • I made a video several years ago where I went over American English vs. British English vowel sounds.

  • If you didn't see it, or even if you did and want to review, I'm going to play it for you right now.

  • Check it out.

  • In this American English pronunciation video,

  • we're going to go over some of the differences in vowel sounds in American English and British English.

  • 00:13:13,220 --> 00:13:19,020 Today, I'm going to make a video with another awesome English channel on YouTube, MinooAngloLink.

  • The reason why I'm collaborating with them is because they're in the UK.

  • So, together we're going to talk about some of the differences between American English

  • and British English pronunciation.

  • Hi Minoo,

  • can you tell me a little about your channel and AngloLink?

  • Hello everyone. My name is Minoo and my YouTube channel is called AngloLink.

  • On this channel, I teach British English,

  • and I base my lessons on what I find to be the most challenging

  • areas of English grammar, pronunciation, or vocabulary for my learners.

  • So, I hope you will come and have a look at some of my lessons.

  • Great. Let's start with the OH diphthong.

  • This is the sound we use: OH.

  • The sound used in British English, however, is the schwa and the UH as in PULL sound.

  • We say 'know', knooooow.

  • And in British, it's 'know'.

  • You can see in the pronunciation on the left, the British pronunciation,

  • that there's less jaw drop for the first sound, than the American pronunciation on the right.

  • Jaw drop is one of the topics I have to work on for a lot of my students.

  • Know.

  • Know.

  • Know.

  • Know.

  • Know.

  • Know.

  • Let's take a look at a sentence.

  • Don't go alone.

  • Each of these words has the OH as in NO diphthong in American English.

  • Don't go alone.

  • In British English: Don't go alone.

  • Don't go alone.

  • Don't go alone.

  • Don't go alone.

  • The AH vowel.

  • In American English, there are many words that have the letter O

  • representing the AH as in FATHER vowel.

  • For example, hot, honest, mom, top.

  • The AH vowel has a good bit of jaw drop and totally relaxed lips.

  • In British English, however, in these words where the O represents the AH, there's a different vowel sound.

  • There's more lip rounding and less jaw drop.

  • For example, I say 'hot'.

  • Minoo says

  • 'hot'.

  • Notice how much more Minoo's lips round for this sound.

  • In American English, the corners of the lips are completely relaxed, and the jaw drops a bit more.

  • Hot.

  • Hot.

  • Hot.

  • Hot.

  • Hot.

  • Hot.

  • Honest.

  • Honest.

  • Honest.

  • Honest.

  • Honest.

  • Honest.

  • An example sentence: Hot or iced coffee?

  • Both 'hot' and 'coffee' have the AH vowel in American English.

  • Hot or iced coffee?

  • Hot or iced coffee?