Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • With 472 points Slytherin House.”

  • The Slytherin philosophy is basically to be the best,

  • to be great --

  • that means working hard,

  • always thinking a few steps ahead of your opponent,

  • and being ruthless in your pursuit of excellence.

  • Because Slytherins are so obsessed

  • with proving themselves superior to others,

  • they can be guilty of arrogance and powerlust

  • There is only power and those too weak to seek it.”

  • Slytherins are very often selfish or self-interested.

  • But on the positive side,

  • they show impressive mastery of their crafts.

  • And as much as the Harry Potter series maligns this house,

  • Slytherin at least is never overlooked

  • or insignificant-feeling,

  • unlike the other two supporting houses.

  • Slytherins are known for their supreme power,

  • importance and achievement.

  • Slytherin will help you on the way to greatness,

  • no doubt about that.”

  • This drive to work hard and achieve greatness

  • is embodied in Slytherin's most infamous member.

  • Tom Riddle a.k.a. Voldemort is undeniably terrible,

  • but he's also very impressive --

  • he's an orphan who became one of the most powerful wizards ever

  • thanks to talent, ambition, and dedication.

  • “I fashioned myself a new name,

  • a name I knew wizards everywhere would one day fear to speak

  • when I became the greatest sorcerer in the world.”

  • The only reason Harry even has special skills

  • is that he has some of Voldemort in him.

  • he transferred some of his powers to you

  • the night he gave you that scar”.

  • And it's implied that Harry could have reached new heights

  • if he'd been sorted into Slytherin.

  • You would have done well in Slytherin”.

  • Harry and Voldemort also share certain qualities

  • that Gryffindors and Slytherins have in common --

  • they're both extremely driven

  • and they'll do anything necessary to win their fight.

  • You possess many of the qualities that Voldemort himself prizes:

  • determination, resourcefulness,

  • and if I may say so, a certain disregard for the rules”.

  • Slytherin's colors are green and silver.

  • Unlike Gryffindor's warm tones, these cool colors tell us

  • that Slytherins are cool, calculating, and controlled.

  • Slytherins are logical and analytical.

  • In the first Harry Potter book, the Sorting Hat tells us

  • that the house's defining quality is single-minded resourcefulness:

  • Those cunning folk use any means to achieve their ends.”

  • So Slytherins are masters of strategy and long-term planning.

  • They apply themselves to their goals with rational, smart steps.

  • They think around and through problems,

  • rather than acting on their gut impulse like fiery red Gryffindors.

  • Slytherins are deeply ambitious.

  • Both green and silver -- thanks to their links to currencies --

  • evoke associations with money and greed,

  • and many Slytherins do value wealth and social status.

  • My father can afford the best.”

  • Then there's the idea ofbeing born with a silver spoon in your mouth

  • or getting somethingon a silver platter,”

  • so silver also speaks to the privilege

  • that many Slytherins are born into.

  • Green also brings to mind the phrase

  • Green with envy

  • and Draco certainly resents Harry

  • for all his fame and special attention.

  • Famous Harry Potter.

  • Can't even go into a bookshop without making the front page.”

  • We often think of silver as second place, less precious than gold,

  • and Slytherins feel like they're always coming in second

  • after the Golden Gryffindors.

  • In our world, you wouldn't necessarily think

  • that Gryffindor's tendency to act first and plan second

  • is all that admirable.

  • But somehow these reckless, spontaneous Gryffindors

  • are always coming out on top in the Harry Potter series.

  • It's not like all Gryffindors are the most talented

  • or skilled people at Hogwarts

  • He possesses no measurable talent, his arrogance rivals even that of his father's

  • and he seems to relish in his fame.”

  • A lot of the time,

  • Harry and his friends seem to get by on dumb luck.

  • Last year, he really did fight off You-Know-Who in the flesh.”

  • Look, it all sounds great when you say it like that,

  • but the truth is, most of that was just luck.”

  • In the Sorcerer's Stone, when Dumbledore awards Gryffindor

  • last-minute points to hand them the House Cup,

  • this would feel like pretty blatant favoritism to the Slytherins

  • who have been working all year to win that cup and

  • have been leading in points.

  • And from this perspective,

  • couldn't you start to get why Slytherins resent Gryffindors,

  • who seem to keep getting handed success

  • even though they don't really apply themselves in an intelligent way?

  • We can even see the Slytherins' sense of unfairness

  • in the starting premise of the story:

  • How is it that a baby with no extraordinary magical talent

  • was able to defeat the greatest wizard of all time?”

  • Voldemort exerts exceptional effort to become the greatest

  • wizard of his time, but a little baby beats him

  • and becomes a celebrity just for passively receiving

  • his parents' love.

  • Slytherins' house element is water.

  • And like liquids,

  • Slytherins are slippery, fluid and hard to pin down.

  • In astrology, water signs are considered to be intuitive,

  • emotional and sensitive.

  • Because they're so hyper-aware and sensitive,

  • Slytherins are image-conscious.

  • They're extremely concerned with how they're perceived.

  • The water element may also connect to potions,

  • Snape's subject of choice.

  • “I don't expect many of you to appreciate the subtle science

  • and exact art that is potion-making.”

  • Potions is an understated art that's all about the slow simmering

  • of carefully chosen ingredients.

  • “I can tell you how to bottle fame, brew glory and even

  • put a stopper in death.”

  • Purposeful, patient and precise is classic Slytherin.

  • Harry Potter may focus more on the negative associations,

  • but green, silver and water have a lot of positive connotations.

  • Silver, the metal, is malleable and adaptive,

  • and Slytherins are far more subtle in their thinking

  • than straightforward Gryffindors.

  • Green is associated with life, vitality, and nature.

  • And Slytherins have astonishing potential for growth, rebirth and renewal.

  • Just as water can take different forms,

  • Slytherins can change and transform -- as we can see in Snape

  • He was the bravest man I've ever known.”

  • Why didn't you tell her?

  • You knew it was me. You didn't say anything

  • and even Narcissa, when she lies to Voldemort

  • that Harry is dead.

  • Dead?” “Dead.”

  • Of all the houses, Slytherin is probably the one

  • most closely linked to its house animal, the snake.

  • There's a reason the symbol of Slytherin house is a serpent.

  • Salazar Slytherin was a Parselmouth.”

  • Even their name sounds like the wordslither,”

  • as inthe snake slithered across the grass.”

  • In Western literature and culture, snakes are associated

  • with cunning, treachery and deception:

  • The serpent in Genesis tempts Eve to eat

  • from the tree of knowledge of good and evil,

  • leading to the fall.

  • The serpent there represents Satan,

  • while the griffin of Gryffindor's name has been associated with Christ.

  • So the story immediately paints Gryffindor and Slytherin

  • as good versus evil --

  • one literally has a Christ symbol in its name,

  • and the other's name sounds like the movement of the animal

  • traditionally linked to the devil.

  • And the Harry Potter story mostly reinforces the Western idea

  • of the snake as devious and evil.

  • Voldemort himself looks snake-like

  • with his smooth, hairless head and slits for nostrils.

  • And Salazar Slytherin's basilisk is a monstrous incarnation

  • of the house's spirit --

  • which is why only Voldemort can control it

  • as heir to Slytherin.

  • Parseltongue won't save you now, Potter. It only obeys me”.

  • Voldemort's snake, Nagini also embodies terrible violence.

  • But there's also another snake we meet early on,

  • at the zoo in The Sorcerer's Stone.

  • Harry understands that this unaggressive animal is just mistreated.

  • He doesn't understand what it's like,

  • lying there day after day

  • watching people press their ugly faces in on you”.

  • In fact, he feels a sense of kinship with the snake.

  • Do you miss your family? I see.

  • That's me as well. I never knew my parents either”.

  • So there's a way in which the snakes of Slytherin

  • are misunderstood and villainized from the start.

  • Outside of Western culture, There are a lot more

  • Positive associations with the snake.

  • It's often been linked to sexual desire and fertility,

  • the mysteries of reproduction.

  • In ancient Egypt the uraeus, or rearing cobra,

  • was a symbol of royalty and power.

  • That reminds us of Slytherin's legacy

  • as a grand, important house.

  • Egyptians also saw the snake as life-giving --

  • just as Snape protects Harry for so many years.

  • Don't tell me now, that you've grown To care for the boy.”

  • snakes shed their skin, and the Slytherins we know best

  • reveal new sides to themselves,

  • symbolically shedding their skin in an act of rebirth.

  • So the snake is an animal of contradictions:

  • it represents deadliness and vengeance and life and renewal.

  • Its venom can be poison or medicine.

  • Ultimately the snake is a symbol of duality,

  • of both good and evil, and their interconnectedness.

  • And Slytherins have both darkness and the capacity for light inside of them.

  • The Slytherin common room Is in the Hogwarts dungeons

  • Underground, just as Slytherins are symbolically hidden away,

  • their true natures not immediately visible to the outside world.

  • The room is partly under the lake,

  • which puts Slytherins close to their element, water.

  • The underwater location visualizes that Slytherins aren't afraid

  • to face the deeper, darker truths of human nature.

  • Some of them are interested in the Dark Arts.

  • The darkness and greenish light make the common room feel

  • a little eerie not entirely comfortable --

  • Echoing how Slytherins keep people at a distance.

  • The house ghost is the Bloody Baron,

  • not the most welcoming character.

  • In the books, we learn that he was in love with Helena Ravenclaw

  • but eventually stabbed her in a rage --

  • and when he realized what he'd done,

  • he turned the knife on himself.

  • So this tragic backstory captures a lot about who Slytherins are --

  • they have intense feelings that they don't know

  • how to express in a healthy way, and this can be a fatal flaw.

  • But they often come to repent the error of their ways.

  • In the books, the Bloody Baron Chooses wears chains

  • to atone for his crime.

  • The house name comes from Salazar Slytherin,

  • one of the founders of Hogwarts.

  • Three of the founders coexisted quite harmoniously.

  • One did not.”

  • Three guesses who.”

  • Salazar is a Basque name meaningold hall,”

  • so this connotes the impressive, long legacy of Slytherin.

  • The Slytherins' fixation with their impressive past

  • might help explain their problematic history with bigotry.

  • Salazar Slytherin himself thought Hogwarts should be for purebloods only.

  • Salazar Slytherin wished to be more selective about the students

  • ddmitted to Hogwarts.

  • He believed that magical learning should be kept within all-magic families.

  • In other words, purebloods.

  • Unable to sway the others, he decided to leave the school.”

  • And this bias lives on in later Slytherins.

  • Associating with Muggles.

  • And I thought your family could sink no lower”.

  • The pureblood issue in Harry Potter is an obvious analogy for racism.

  • Her speciality was muggle studies.”

  • It is Ms. Burgises belief That muggles are not so different from us.

  • She would, given her way, have us mate with them.”

  • The very prejudice Draco Malfoy has blond, typically Aryan looks,

  • so that creates a subconscious link between his racism against Muggle-borns

  • and the ethnic hatred directed at non-whites in our world.

  • No one asked your opinion, you filthy little Mudblood.”

  • And the hate-driven, tyrannical behaviors

  • of Voldemort and Grindelwald make us think of Nazism

  • or other totalitarian, genocidal regimes.

  • Your parents would be proud. Especially your filthy Muggle mother”.

  • In a tweet, J. K. Rowling said,

  • Not all Slytherins think they're racially superior.