Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • On this episode of China Uncensored:

  • China has just built a ginormous bridge connecting

  • the Chinese mainland with Hong Kong and Macau.

  • Good for drivers,

  • so-so for freedom.

  • Actually, not that good for drivers either.

  • Welcome to China Uncensored.

  • I'm your host, Chris Chappell.

  • The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge

  • officially opened to the public on Tuesday.

  • Chinese leader Xi Jinping even made

  • a special trip to attend the ceremony,

  • coming all the way from the Hundred Acre Wood.

  • Yay for me.”

  • Now the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge

  • is the world's longest sea bridge:

  • 34 miles end to end.

  • It's been dubbed thebridge of death”.

  • Sorrythat's not as metal as it sounds.

  • They call it that because

  • so many construction workers died making it.

  • At least 19 people were killed and hundreds seriously injured.

  • Also, the bridge was completed two years past deadline

  • and nearly 1.5 billion dollars over budget.

  • But never mind all the financial problems and dead people!

  • The bridge will be good for the economy.

  • "It is envisaged that the collaboration between Guangdong,

  • Hong Kong and Macau,

  • in terms of trade, finance, logistics,

  • and tourism will be strengthened.

  • Hong Kong will assume a more proactive role

  • in the development of the Greater Bay area.”

  • The Greater Bay Area is a hub made up of nine cities

  • in mainland China's Guangdong province:

  • Shenzhen, Huizhou, Dongguan, Guangzhou,

  • Foshan, Zhaoqing, Jiangmen, Zhongshan, and Zhuhai,

  • along with the two Special Administrative Regions

  • of Macau and Hong Kong.

  • Compared to otherBay Areas”—

  • like Tokyo, New York and San Francisco

  • China's Greater Bay Area has by far the largest population,

  • but the lowest GDP per capita.

  • Speaking of the economy, the cost of the bridge

  • was originally estimated to break even after 36 years.

  • But like I said earlier, it's just a tad over budget,

  • plus it looks like they may have overestimated

  • how many people would be using the bridge,

  • so it will take a little longer.

  • One Chinese professor says it could take more than 72 years.

  • 72 years!

  • By that time,

  • I'll almost have finished paying off my student loans.

  • The official reason for the bridge is to reduce trade barriers

  • by being a faster and simpler way to travel

  • between cities in the region.

  • Granted, it's not quite as simple as crossing a bridge in,

  • say, the San Francisco Bay Area

  • where all you need is one of those

  • FasTrak devices behind your windshield.

  • Because to cross the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge,

  • you need three separate permits,

  • each of which has a completely different application process.

  • The process is so convoluted that the government

  • had to make this two-and-a-half minute animated video

  • just to explain it.

  • Oh, and did I mention that in addition to

  • the the three separate permits,

  • you also need separate vehicle insurance

  • for each of the three regions,

  • and you have to reserve a parking space

  • at least 12 hours in advance?

  • It's simple and convenient.”

  • But the good news is that most people won't even have

  • to deal with all of those permits and insurance issues.

  • Because in Hong Kong,

  • they're capping the number of private cars

  • that can use the bridge at 10,000.

  • Who's eligible to apply?

  • Hong Kong tech companies who pay

  • a certain amount of taxes in mainland China.

  • If you're a Hong Kong resident,

  • you can also either donate 5 million yuan

  • that's more than 700,000 dollars

  • in mainland China,

  • or you can be a member of the National People's Congress

  • or the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference

  • at national, provincial, prefecture

  • and county levels of Guangdong province.”

  • I guess the People's Republic

  • didn't exactly build the people's bridge.

  • For other, less elite, Hongkongers,

  • you can still take the shuttle buses

  • that will be going across the bridge.

  • But you might be better off just taking the ferry.

  • Especially when you factor in

  • all the bridge-related construction scandals.

  • Like the one in which a former technician admitted to

  • faking the quality test results of concrete because...

  • hewas just lazy.”

  • Or when in 2016 officials admitted that

  • technical problems had caused

  • drifting of an artificial island

  • that housed facilities for the bridge.”

  • Or whenaerial photos emerged showing

  • that interlocking concrete blocks

  • placed around the edges of the island

  • had drifted away.”

  • But you know what they say in China:

  • Safety, schmafety.”

  • What's that, Shelley?

  • OK, I'm being told no one in China says that.

  • At least not out loud.

  • But they do have a common saying: “chàbuduō”—

  • which meansgood enough.”

  • And for the sake of all the people

  • who'll be crossing that bridge,

  • I hope it is.

  • But despite all the things that make

  • the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge so, so great,

  • some people still have concerns.

  • And Hong Kongers, with their dangerous freedom of speech,

  • are even so reckless as to express their concerns in public.

  • Like Hong Kong lawmaker Claudia Mo.

  • The bridge is a waste of money,” she told CNN.

  • When it comes to linking the mainland to Hong Kong,

  • we have air, sea and land linkages already.

  • Why do we need this extra project?”

  • I mean, sure those billions of dollars could have been

  • spent on things like affordable housing,

  • or fixing Hong Kong's outdated water management system.

  • But I think the answer to Mo's question is pretty obvious...

  • because she goes on to explain it herself.

  • “[The bridge] links Hong Kong to China

  • almost like an umbilical cord.

  • You see it,

  • and you know you're linked up to the motherland.”

  • And motherland always knows best!

  • What better way to integrate Hong Kong and Macau

  • into the political system of mainland China than

  • by making it easy and seamless to travel between them!

  • Soon, borders will disappear.

  • Along with Hong Kong's pesky freedoms.

  • I guess it's a good thing they still have

  • some work to do on the ease-of-use front.

  • So what do you think about

  • the new Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge?

  • Leave your comments below.

  • And before we go,

  • it's time to answer a question

  • from a fan of China Uncensored

  • who contributes to us

  • through the crowdfunding website Patreon.

  • Karl Diaz asks:

  • What is China's best outcome from the midterm elections?”

  • Interesting question, Karl.

  • I'd say the Chinese Communist Party wants

  • Democrats to win majorities in the House

  • and Senate in the US midterms.

  • But it's not because they like Democrats better.

  • They just believe it would make it harder

  • for Trump to get things done.

  • They're right, but not in the way that matters most to them.

  • Because while Trump would have to fight a Democratic Congress

  • harder on most of his domestic policies,

  • there's already wide bipartisan support for most of

  • Trump's tactics for dealing with the Chinese regime

  • including those trade tariffs.

  • In fact, criticizing the Chinese regime

  • has become one of the few unifying positions in US politics.

  • The fact is, the Chinese Communist Party is...

  • confused by Trump.

  • They expected him to talk tough on China

  • as a presidential candidate,

  • like other past candidates,

  • but then soften his stance when he became the president,

  • like other past presidents.

  • And at first, it looked like that might happen.

  • But now it's pretty clear that the Trump administration

  • is changing the US approach to China.

  • And the Chinese Communist Party is not sure how to handle this.

  • So they may not criticize Trump directly,

  • but they sure want to undermine him.

  • Thanks for your question, Karl.

  • And remember, you too can have your question answered

  • on China Uncensored when you become a Patreon supporter.

  • Join us at Patreon.com/ChinaUncensored

  • and contribute a dollar or more per episode.

  • Thanks for watching China Uncensored.

  • Once again, I'm Chris Chappell.

  • See you next time.

On this episode of China Uncensored:

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級 英國腔

中國推出世界最長的跨海大橋 (China Unveils World's Longest Sea Bridge)

  • 62 3
    Makoto 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字