Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hey everyone, it's Andy with this week's Tips for Work and Life.

  • I've got a great one for everybody but especially the top brass, those executives who are searching

  • and job interviewing.

  • I've got three keys to getting that senior role.

  • If you are a junior or mid-level resource, if you can do these three things, I promise

  • you'll get hired.

  • If you are an executive or a senior manager or a director or somebody at that level, you

  • won't get hired unless you do these three things.

  • Let's talk a little bit about it.

  • Think about what's happening when you're job interviewing.

  • You go in there, you're exchanging information.

  • You've got to have the right responses to their questions.

  • You've got to have good questions that you're asking.

  • You've got to have the right background.

  • You need to impress.

  • When you're at the junior and mid-levels, that's usually good enough, but when you're

  • at the senior levels it simply is not.

  • There are three things you absolutely must do, so let's roll.

  • Number one, you need to get the interviewers, likely the senior interviewers, and the company

  • thinking into the future.

  • If you can't get them to imagine what their life will be like and what their company will

  • be like with you there, you'll never get hired.

  • You can have a great background.

  • You could have been there, done that.

  • That's great, but if you can't shift their mindset to thinking you're serviceable as

  • opposed to you're going to catapult them forward you're not going to get hired.

  • One of the easiest ways to do that is to shift the discussion from your background and your

  • credentials, which you will review undoubtedly, to the future.

  • What are their goals?

  • What are their ambitions?

  • Where do they see the company going?

  • What exactly do they want to accomplish?

  • Then you need to articulate how exactly you would do it to take them there step by step

  • and walk them through what the future could like with you "and here's what I would do,

  • then I would do this, and then I would do that."

  • You need to make sure that in your responses to their questions or in your line of questioning,

  • when you get a chance to ask questions, that you're asking that about their future goals,

  • and then make sure you articulate specifically how you're going to accomplish that.

  • That's number one.

  • Number two, leaders are inclusive and they're inspiring.

  • You are the high tide that has to lift all the boats.

  • Right?

  • Leaders build more leaders, they don't build more followers, so how are you going to show

  • them that you're great at inspiring, you're inclusive, you're great at building teams.

  • They're probably going to ask you questions about how you're going to build your team

  • and that's great, but I'm talking about giving them that deep, good feeling that having you

  • there is going to inspire everybody and that you actually are inclusive and that you're

  • a great person to work with.

  • One of the best ways to do that is ... Now, think about your job interviewing process.

  • A lot of these very senior-level interviewing processes they start with senior people up

  • front because you don't want to waste anybody's time, you're trying to get a feel for each

  • other.

  • Then you have a middle part to it that has a lot of other people.

  • You're probably interviewing with colleagues, potentially internal customers, maybe some

  • of your staff, and so on.

  • At the end, you revisit or visit for the first time with a lot of the senior folks.

  • Along the way, you're going to be able to gather a lot of information and you're going

  • to be able to talk to a lot of people.

  • One of the best ways at the end to show that you're extremely inclusive is to make lots

  • of references to the other people and the insight that they brought up.

  • For example, "Hey, Mary Jane said, when I was talking to her she said something about

  • this.

  • It really struck me.

  • I love that idea.

  • Hey, Mr. Executive Man, I'd love to get your perspective on this as it relates to something

  • else, something greater, something more grand, a deeper level of insight."

  • If you can include a number of references to other people in the organization and the

  • good conversations you've had with them, what you're doing is you're planting seeds in the

  • interviewer's mind that you are an inclusive person, you're interested.

  • They can start to see you as part of the team working with the other people who you're referencing

  • almost like you're already there.

  • That's another way, this is also a great way to also get them to look into the future by

  • making references to other people that you've interviewed with, ideas they've come up with,

  • your thoughts on them, and getting additional insight from the senior executives in the

  • company.

  • That's number two, make sure your inclusive and inspiring.

  • Number three, you're going to get a chance to ask questions throughout your interviewing

  • process.

  • In some cases you might be asking them along the way through the interview, in other cases

  • you're going to be asking them at the end, but one thing that you absolutely need to

  • do in addition to asking great questions is you need to make sure that you do not ask

  • questions, however awesome they are, that lead to a dead-end answer because if they

  • lead to a dead-end answer you're a dead end.

  • I'm talking about you ask a great question, they give you an answer, and then you're moving

  • on to the next question.

  • That's the big mistake.

  • The message that you're sending to them is that you are a puddle skipper.

  • You are not somebody who's digging deep to get information, collecting it all.

  • You're not well-researched, you're not digging deep enough to get the information that you

  • need to make a good decision, and now they're starting to imagine you as an employer there

  • and you're working with the people in your group or other units and you're not digging

  • deep enough.

  • If you have follow-up questions and you start to drill down in your line of questioning,

  • that sends the message that you are well-researched, you're thoughtful, and you're making sure

  • that you're getting all the information that you need to make a good decision.

  • It also sends them the message that when you're working with your staff you will make sure

  • that you're getting all the information to make good decisions.

  • That is something that they want so that when they give you the autonomy to run your unit

  • or run your division or whatever it might be they've got confidence that you're going

  • to be a great researcher, you're going to get that information, and you're going to

  • make well-educated decisions because you're informed as opposed to people who skim the

  • surface and oftentimes make great mistakes and make bad choices because they didn't have

  • all the information.

  • There you have it, three biggies.

  • Number one, you got to get them to thinking in the future, number two you've got to get

  • them to feel you're inclusive, and number three you're asking questions that have follow-up

  • questions to show that you're well-researched and that you're great at getting the information

  • you need to make executive-level decisions.

  • Those are three great points.

  • If you want more insight on how to do all three of those, I've got two great resources

  • for you.

  • One is an e-book.

  • It's called Ace Your Job Interview.

  • I give it away free.

  • It's mastering the best responses to the 14 most effective job interview questions.

  • There's also 43 variations of those questions in that e-book, so you'll have a great resource

  • to anticipate the types of questions that you're going to have to address so your responses

  • will be great.

  • I also have a fantastic webinar.

  • It's a solid hour of teaching.

  • It's also free.

  • It's called Three Keys to Ace Any Job Interview.

  • The participants, the attendees get a couple of great e-books, one of which is How to Interview

  • the Employer, 75 great questions to ask before you take any job so you will have loads of

  • questions to choose from and really help catapult your researching and your prep as far as asking

  • them questions.

  • I hope you take me up on those.

  • There's links in the description.

  • If you enjoyed this video, give me a like, a comment, and a share.

  • You know I love your circulation and I love your help sharing my message.

  • If you're watching this anywhere other than my YouTube channel or my Tips for Work and

  • Life blog, hop over to the blog, I've got loads more content on these and other subjects.

  • Until next week, have a great one.

Hey everyone, it's Andy with this week's Tips for Work and Life.

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

A2 初級 美國腔

高管求職面試技巧。獲得高級職位的3個關鍵 (Executive Job Interview Tips: 3 Keys to Getting a Senior Role)

  • 38 3
    lawrence 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字