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  • - Welcome Gary Vaynerchuk!

  • (audience cheers)

  • - Thank you. - Yeah, man.

  • (audience cheers)

  • - Thank you, Philly, sit, let's do this.

  • (audience murmurs)

  • What up, what up?

  • What up?

  • (audience cheers)

  • Good to see you, Philly.

  • First of all, before we get this started,

  • the amount of gratitude that I have for this city

  • for beating the fucking Patriots in the Super Bowl.

  • (audience cheers wildly)

  • Let's fucking go!

  • Thank you for that.

  • Man, I hate those fuckers.

  • Today's an extremely special day for me

  • because today is my mother's birthday.

  • (audience cheers)

  • And I thought I would use that as a framework

  • of the opening dialogue, giving a sense of

  • who's speaking today.

  • I won't go too much into mindset and motivation

  • and those kind of things 'cause I think we have a lot

  • of people covering it, I'm actually going to go

  • pretty practical on the back half of this

  • about why I think most of you are massively missing the mark

  • and I include myself in that.

  • That we're missing the mark in this enormous gold rush

  • of Facebook ads and Instagram ads, LinkedIn, YouTube.

  • No matter how much content you're producing for whatever

  • you're trying to achieve, whether that's to raise money

  • for the PTA or sell sneakers or build your real estate firm,

  • whatever you do, the one thing, for all the people

  • here in the front and all those homies that I love so much

  • in the back-- (audience cheers)

  • Man, it takes a while for noise to get the fuck up here.

  • Shit is crazy. (audience laughs)

  • The one thing I know for fact that connects

  • every person here, that cameraman right there,

  • myself, you, all of you, is that attention is the asset.

  • That before you can tell me how great you are,

  • why I should buy your thing, why I should do the thing

  • that you want me to do, vote for me, buy my thing,

  • do this, help that,

  • that attention is the asset and I have spent the last

  • 20 years of my business career becoming a practitioner

  • in what I call under-priced attention.

  • Whether it's email, or websites, or Google AdWords,

  • or YouTube, or Facebook, or Twitter,

  • the reason I have the great luxury of standing up here,

  • at least for the merit of what I've been able to accomplish

  • in my professional career, is I've been able to execute

  • within real estate that has been under-priced by the market,

  • I've been able to storytell and execute in there

  • and that has led to the results that I have.

  • As I got older, I got smarter and started investing

  • in the platforms that became the most important real estate

  • and those are the foundations of the things,

  • and when I buy the New York Jets and win by Super Bowls...

  • (audience cheers)

  • It will, 100%, be on the back

  • of the things that I'm going to talk to you

  • on the second half which is how all of you need to start

  • buying and creating on these platforms

  • and why so many of you have failed.

  • How many people here by show of hands have run Facebook

  • or Instagram ads and it hasn't worked?

  • 'Cause I think it's a lot of people, raise them high.

  • There's a very specific reason.

  • It's because it's not that easy, it's not just, you know,

  • it's like me saying I'm going to put a ball in the hoop.

  • That's great, but it doesn't mean I'm going to be

  • a professional basketball player.

  • It takes a skill set, and I'll get into that,

  • and that's the thing, if you want to ask me what I'm trying

  • to accomplish here today, every person in here is

  • under-spending and under-creating on Facebook,

  • LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter, podcasting, email,

  • everybody, me too.

  • And I have 22 full time people, I'm spending three to four

  • million dollars a year between advertising dollars

  • and people and I'm under-doing it.

  • So, I really need to deliver that, that's part two.

  • Part one is a little bit more interesting to me.

  • Over the last year, it's become obvious to me that optimism

  • is actually a strategy.

  • That I'm fascinated by what I was gifted.

  • I was gifted, through my mom's DNA and by the way

  • that she parented me, to be fundamentally in a place

  • where I just am incapable of seeing the negative.

  • I don't really, it's not that I'm delusional.

  • Basically, my life for the last 27 years

  • has been pretty basic.

  • If I wake up and me and the seven or eight people

  • that I love the most didn't die, I'm fucking pumped.

  • (audience laughs)

  • (audience applauds)

  • Now I really, really need you to understand what I'm saying.

  • I mean it, it's super basic.

  • I have a happy life not because of my success.

  • Seeing my dear high school friend, Jess, right there,

  • one, two, three, in the fifth row...

  • It was super fun, I ran into her in the hotel last night

  • and I was there with her husband and friend

  • and it was fun for me, it was emotional for me

  • because she's one of a very, you know, we only went to

  • a high school of 254 kids, I know it's 254 in our class now.

  • I don't know how many of you follow me on Instagram

  • but the happiest day I've had in the last month

  • was when I posted my report card a month ago

  • because I was ranked 243 out of 254 in my high school.

  • (audience laughs)

  • But there's not a lot of people, because I was very insular,

  • what she can tell you is that for the first three

  • and seven eighths year of my high school career,

  • because I worked in my dad's liquor store

  • and because I worked after school,

  • I didn't do after school sports,

  • I didn't hang out, I didn't have much of a social life,

  • I sold baseball cards in the malls of New Jersey

  • and I worked at my dad's store, I was in my own shit.

  • And so, for me, it's fun to see her right here

  • because you could say, you know, I have empathy.

  • One could say, well, you're happy 'cause you've made it.

  • I was fucking super happy when I wasn't making it

  • and doing the shit that nobody wanted to do.

  • You know, a lot of people are very confused

  • with my narrative, when people want to troll me,

  • they're like, easy for you, you were handed

  • three million dollars or this, that, the other thing.

  • I spent the first 12 years of my career, 15 hours a day,

  • paying myself less than $100,000 a year, every year,

  • building my family liquor store business for my parents.

  • I left at 34 years old with zero equity in Wine Library,

  • no money to my name, and no equity on paper.

  • I basically started over seven years ago.

  • But I checked, thanks Dad, but I checked--

  • (audience laughs)

  • But I checked a very important box for me.

  • I don't know how many of you are immigrants,

  • or the children of immigrants, or how many of you,

  • in the same way that I am (audience cheers)

  • that have the great, great fortune to have their parents

  • be their heroes, but there's no greater feeling in life

  • than feeling that you've settled the score with your parents

  • and gave them as much as they gave you.

  • And that feels incredible for me of what I did

  • in the first part of my career but here's what I will

  • tell you on my mom's birthday.

  • My mom did some crazy ass parenting on me.

  • First of all, the number one thing that my mom did for me

  • and the number one issue for the far majority of this room,

  • and I'm just lucky of good parenting and DNA,

  • I don't think I'm better than you, I'm just telling you

  • because I see it every day and because I've read a lot

  • of tweets in the last 24 hours of people that are

  • in this audience, and I look at not just the tweet

  • that you said you're excited to see me, I look at all

  • the shit you post 'cause I'm trying to get a sense

  • of you fuckers. (audience laughs)

  • The number one gift my mom gave me is a lack of entitlement.

  • If you want to talk-- (audience applauds)

  • For all the good shit that's going on with me,

  • I literally think I mean nothing.

  • I'm being dead serious with you.

  • I think I'm the greatest of all time,

  • with my confidence, bravado, and ego, and excitement,

  • and the things I see are happening, but I equally know

  • that if I disappeared tomorrow, cool,

  • I'd have a good social media day and then,

  • everybody would move, I'm telling you,

  • when Prince and David Bowie died in that little window,

  • and I watched those icons of culture get about 24 hours

  • of love and then everybody forgot, I was like, fuck.

  • Right, I mean it.

  • I mean it, and so, what's really empowering

  • and what's holding so many people back here is entitlement.

  • You feel like somebody owes you something because something

  • went wrong somewhere along the way and I don't.

  • I actually thing whatever went wrong for you

  • is the best shit that ever happened to you

  • because adversity is absolutely the foundation of success.

  • (audience applauds)

  • The other thing I know is I have bad news,

  • nobody gives a fuck about your problems.

  • (audience laughs)

  • And this is super important to understand,

  • the second you actually understand that nobody actually

  • gives a shit, the only people that listen to you complaining

  • are your loser fucking friends.

  • (audience laughs)

  • If you like complaining, just take a step back,

  • look around the next time you're complaining about

  • the government, or racial, or feminine.

  • I had a guy sit in front of me the other day crying that

  • his life was bad 'cause he was a white male.

  • (audience murmurs)

  • Rich, white male.

  • I was like, oh shit, we've gone everywhere now.

  • (audience laughs)

  • You're either on the offense or defense.

  • I just want you to know something, one of the things

  • that's been really on my mind is I think a lot of people

  • think they're in the middle, they're like at trans.

  • You're only on the offense or the defense.

  • And I've realized that I've been on the offense

  • my whole life because I never felt entitled to anything.

  • An incredible thing happens when you're born

  • with very little.

  • I was born in the Soviet Union, we come to America,

  • I live in a studio apartment in Queens.

  • My parents bought me six toys in my entire life

  • kind of thing, we took one, one family vacation

  • in my entire life, right.

  • When I wanted a Nintendo, my mom looked me dead in the face

  • and said, good, go buy it.

  • And that was huge, on the flip side, what she also did

  • was she instilled...

  • Let me rephrase, she reinforced things that came natural

  • to me and made them the most important things.

  • While I was getting D's and F's and every other

  • immigrant parent was making their kids get A's and B's

  • 'cause they thought that's what mattered,

  • my mom was accelerating and going out of her mind

  • any time that I showed compassion,

  • any time that I showed empathy,

  • any time that I showed gratitude.

  • I once opened a door for a woman, this is an amazingly

  • interesting story to me.

  • I remember after losing a little league baseball game,

  • which I'm extremely competitive, so basically, if I lost

  • at anything, from the ages of five to 13,

  • I cried on the spot.

  • Like some straight fucking real tears shit.

  • So we had a devastating loss in the little league

  • baseball game that we lost, I mean, I remember we lost

  • to the cougars, three to two, those fucking--

  • (hisses) Anyway.

  • We went to McDonald's 'cause, my mom didn't like buying shit

  • but she knew I was super sad, so she was going to buy me

  • a fucking Big Mac, so we went to McDonald's.

  • We got there and I will remember this for the rest of

  • my life, I open, I was eight, I opened a door for a woman.

  • You know, just walking, just opened the door for a woman.

  • You would've thought that I won a Nobel Peace Prize.

  • My mom made such a big deal about that.

  • You know, there's a legendary story for my mom

  • when, on my 10th birthday, we went to Toys "R" Us

  • and because Cabbage Patch Kids were so hard to get