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  • "Getting from here to there, it's been a long while."

  • Oh, hi.

  • My time is finally here.

  • James from engVid.

  • I can't believe this, this is like the Mirror Universe.

  • If you watch Star Trek, you'll understand; if not, go watch Mirror Universe with Star

  • Trek.

  • I have two, look at them, I have two Mr. Es.

  • In the first one Mr. E is hot, and the first one Mr. E is cold.

  • Let's go to the board.

  • E, what's up?

  • "It's very hot.

  • 35 degrees centigrade."

  • You're right.

  • I see you're wearing your Bermuda shorts.

  • And the second E is saying he's very cold: "It's minus 30 degrees centigrade."

  • Ow, this isn't good.

  • I feel for you.

  • But don't you think there are better ways to say it's very hot or it's very cold?

  • I think so, and in today's lesson I'm going to teach some of you...

  • Not some of you.

  • I'm going to teach all of you how to get rid of the word "very" to describe everything,

  • and use other words which give more information, which will make you sound more like a native

  • speaker and make your writing phenomenal.

  • Oh, "phenomenal"?

  • That's a word for "very good".

  • Are you ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So, today's lesson is on "very".

  • "Very" is a very good word, that's why we use it, but when you're writing, to hear somebody

  • say: "Very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very" is what we call monotonous, it

  • means "mono" as one, "tonous", one tone, one sound - very boring.

  • So let's change that from you being...

  • You know, using "very" because I teach and I notice a lot of students saying things,

  • like: "Teacher, today it's very cold outside."

  • I'm like: -"Yeah, it is."

  • -"And I'm very tired and very hungry."

  • I'm like: "Okay, okay."

  • It's like being punched in the face again and again, and I just want to say: "Stop with

  • the 'very'.

  • Use a different word."

  • But it's not fair because "very" is a very good word-there, I did it again-we just need

  • to find other words to make your language sound richer to improve it so you sound more

  • like a native English speaker, and to make it more interesting for you because it will

  • express more of who you are and your ideas in a better way.

  • It makes you unique.

  • You ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • You'll notice I put "very" in red because this is something we don't want to do, we

  • don't want to keep saying: "very".

  • We want to change that up.

  • And I'm going to give you a list of words that people or students usually say when they

  • say "very" that I've heard many, many times.

  • And maybe you've done this.

  • And today I'm going to give you singular words to use instead.

  • I'll explain them, just in case they're difficult.

  • Let's start with the first one.

  • People say: "Very rude", instead of saying that, you can say: "vulgar".

  • "Vulgar" means very rude, and if somebody says to me: "Your language is vulgar", I'll

  • probably stop talking because it means it's not right, it's inappropriate, it's very bad.

  • Vulgar.

  • "I don't like your vulgar tone", your rude tone.

  • It's strong.

  • "Very short", another word we say is "brief", which means small.

  • We had a very brief...

  • We had a very brief conversation, a very short conversation.

  • Cool?

  • "Boring".

  • When you say: "Class was very boring today", you can say: "dull".

  • "Dull" means very boring.

  • It also means... See?

  • Here's a bonus when you use these words, stupid.

  • If you say someone is dull, you can say they're very boring, or dull meaning they're stupid.

  • Don't use it like that too often; people don't like being called stupid.

  • And if you say: "He's rather dull, isn't he?"

  • I have to listen for context to mean stupid or boring.

  • Next one, everybody's favourite: "Very good".

  • "Teacher, the food is very good.

  • The lesson is very good.

  • I like this, it's very good."

  • Why don't we change that to the word "superb"?

  • Look carefully at the word "superb", you have the word "super" written inside it.

  • "Super" means what?

  • Above average, excellent, or superb, very good.

  • "The food was superb."

  • People don't usually use this word, so if you tell me when I cook for you that it's

  • superb, I'm telling you right now I will take that as such an amazing compliment.

  • Gentlemen, if you tell a woman she looks superb, she'll be like: "Thank you.

  • Really?"

  • Because no one says it.

  • All right?

  • "Freezing", you can say: "It's very cold outside", but in minus 35, it's freezing.

  • I can put meat outside and it will turn to ice, it's freezing, that's how cold it is.

  • And if you tell me it's freezing, I'm going to get a jacket and another coat, and a hat,

  • and a scarf because I know it's very, very cold.

  • You don't have to say: "It's very, very cold today."

  • Say: "It's freezing."

  • Next, here's a nice word, this is what we call a $10 word.

  • Cha-ching.

  • "Ravenous".

  • Even when you say it, there's: "Arr, arr".

  • When you're ravenous, you're not hungry.

  • If you walk into a restaurant and say: "I'm ravenous", they will get all the cooks together

  • and start cooking right away, immediately, knowing that they have to feed you because

  • you'll eat everything.

  • You can use this about l'amour, the love.

  • "I'm ravenous for l'amour.

  • I love it.

  • I'm hungry for it.

  • I want it desperately."

  • It's a great word.

  • You can be ravenous about reading, it means: "I want to eat it and take all of it."

  • Nice word, I like this word, even the: "Arr", it's so sexy.

  • Sorry.

  • "Sluggish".

  • In the morning when I get up I move very slowly, you know?

  • Like, real, word, if you're in Toronto the TTC is rather sluggish in the morning.

  • You know what I'm saying?

  • You're always late.

  • It means very slow.

  • But in the morning I'm usually sluggish, I'm moving slow, you know?

  • Slow, sluggish, like a slug, like a bug.

  • Slow.

  • His sluggish reaction.

  • Slow reaction.

  • This one has an asterisk: "Very fast", when something's very fast.

  • I read many of your comments and it's like: "He speaks: 'Blah-blah-blah-blah'.

  • He speaks so quickly, so rapidly.

  • I don't understand anything."

  • Yes, James is a rapid speaker.

  • I speak very quickly or I speak very fast.

  • They moved quickly or you say they moved at a rapid pace, very quickly, very fast.

  • So, instead of saying: "Very quickly, very fast", you can use the word: "rapid" or "rapidly".

  • Right?

  • Adverb.

  • You can say: "rapidly".

  • Okay?

  • I told you I'm going to give you lots of information so you can really change up your vocabulary

  • and sound amazing.

  • Sound superb.

  • When you're tired, you're coming home from work, you can say: "I'm so tired.

  • I'm very, very tired.

  • I'm always very tired."

  • Use the word "exhausted".

  • That means done, finished, totalled, toast, no more.

  • I'm exhausted.

  • Cool?

  • It means you want to go to sleep now.

  • Or if you're exhausted of this conversation, then no more, I can't do any more, I'm done,

  • it's over.

  • "Poor", a lot of people like to use the word "poor".

  • Most native speakers don't even use the word I'm going to teach you because it's so strong.

  • If you say: "I'm very poor" it means I have no money.

  • If I'm destitute, you live on the street, my friend, you eat with the rats.

  • Okay?

  • You and the rats share Kentucky Fried Chicken out of garbage at night.

  • All right?

  • I'm just saying.

  • But if you say: "I'm destitute", it means: "I'm very poor."

  • You want to remember this word for the next time your English friend says: -"Hey, Jimmy.

  • Can I borrow 5 dollars?"

  • -"Sorry, dude.

  • I'm destitute."

  • He will give you 5 dollars and be like: "I didn't know it was so bad.

  • You're so poor, you're destitute?"

  • It means my house is...

  • I live on the street.

  • My house, I have nothing.

  • I'm destitute.

  • After the divorce, most people are destitute.

  • Don't get divorced.

  • Okay, next.