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  • It was June 2014.

    譯者: Lilian Chiu 審譯者: Yanyan Hong

  • I was 30 years old,

    2014 年 6 月,

  • and I received a call from my doctor's office

    我 30 歲,

  • to say my test results were in.

    我的醫生的辦公室打了通電話給我,

  • So I walked up to see her in my lunch break, and my doctor said

    說我的檢驗結果出來了。

  • she was very sorry to tell me that I had breast cancer.

    所以,我在午休時間 去找我的醫生,她說

  • I didn't want to believe her and at first, I didn't.

    她非常遺憾要告訴我,我得了乳癌。

  • You see, I'm a lawyer and I needed some evidence.

    我不想相信她, 一開始,我的確不相信。

  • So I'm very embarrassed to tell you all

    要知道,我是個律師,我需要證據。

  • that I stood up and I walked around to where she was sitting

    所以,我非常不好意思地告訴各位,

  • so that I could look over her shoulder and verify

    我站起來,繞到她坐的地方後面,

  • what was written on the page in front of her.

    這樣我才能從她肩上看到並確認

  • (Laughter)

    她面前的那張紙上寫了什麼。

  • Malignant carcinoma.

    (笑聲)

  • But still not wanting to believe it, I said,

    惡性腫瘤。

  • "Now, malignant carcinoma, you're sure that means cancer?"

    但我還是不願相信,我說:

  • (Laughter)

    「惡性腫瘤,你確定 它的意思就是癌症嗎?」

  • She told me she was sure.

    (笑聲)

  • Back at work, I handed over the urgent things that needed to be done

    她告訴我,她很肯定。

  • while I was having more tests to see if my cancer had spread.

    回到工作上,我把 需要處理的急事都交付出去,

  • But at that moment, work wasn't my priority.

    同時我接受更多檢測, 看我的癌症是否有擴散。

  • I was thinking about how I was going to tell my family and friends

    但在那時刻, 工作不是我的第一要務。

  • that I had cancer.

    我在想的是,我要如何 告訴我的家人和朋友

  • How I was going to answer their questions

    我得了癌症。

  • about how bad it was and whether I was going to be OK,

    他們可能會問我一些問題,

  • when I didn't know that myself.

    比如狀況有多糟,我是否會沒事,

  • I was wondering if my partner and I

    而我都不知道答案,要如何回答?

  • would ever have an opportunity to start a family.

    我在納悶,我的另一半和我

  • And I was figuring out how I was going to tell my mother,

    是否會有機會成家。

  • who had herself had breast cancer when she was pregnant with me.

    我在想著,我要如何告訴我媽媽,

  • She would know how I was feeling

    她自己在懷我的時候也得了乳癌。

  • and have an idea of what lay ahead for me.

    她會懂我的感受

  • But I also didn't want her to have to relive her cancer experience.

    且知道我接下來要面對什麼。

  • What I didn't appreciate at the time

    但我也不想讓她 再走過一次她的癌症經驗。

  • was that work was about to play a huge role in my treatment and recovery.

    我當時還不知道,

  • That it would be my coworkers and my job

    工作將會在我的治療和恢復中 扮演很重要的角色。

  • that would make me feel valuable and human

    後來是我的同事和我的工作

  • at times when I would have otherwise felt like a statistic.

    讓我覺得我有價值、我是人,

  • That it would be my job that would give me routine and stability

    要不然,我那時可能 會覺得自己只是統計數字。

  • when I was dealing with so many difficult personal decisions

    是我的工作給了我 例行公事和穩定性,

  • and so much uncertainty.

    那時我需要處理好多困難的個人決定

  • Like, what sort of breast reconstruction I was going to have.

    和好多的不確定性。

  • And at a time like that,

    比如,我要做哪一種乳房重建。

  • you would think that I would turn to my family and friends for support.

    在那樣的時刻,

  • And yes, of course I did that.

    你們可能會認為, 我應該向家人朋友尋求支持。

  • But it would ultimately be my colleagues

    是的,當然我有這麼做。

  • who would play a huge role in my day-to-day life.

    但最終還是我的同事

  • And they would be the ones to make me laugh.

    在我每天的生活中扮演重要的角色。

  • You see, we were a pretty close team,

    讓我笑的人是他們。

  • and we shared a couple of really good in-jokes,

    我們是個很親密的團隊,

  • like this time they overheard someone ask me

    我們有一些只有自己人 才知道的笑話,

  • how I got my hair so shiny and perfect --

    比如,有一次他們 不小心聽到有人問我

  • without knowing that it was, of course, a wig,

    怎樣能使頭髮如此閃亮、完美──

  • and you know, it was a very good wig

    卻完全不知道,那是假髮,

  • and it did make getting ready in the mornings very easy.

    而且那是頂很好的假髮,

  • (Laughter)

    它也讓早上起床之後的 梳妝整理變得很容易。

  • But in little moments like this, I appreciated what their support meant,

    (笑聲)

  • and I wondered what I would have done without that network.

    但像這樣的小小時刻, 我很感謝他們的支持帶給我的意義,

  • I've spoken with so many people, women in particular,

    若沒有那支持關係, 我不知道我該怎麼辦。

  • who haven't had the chance to have that network

    我和好多人談過,特別是女性,

  • because they haven't been given the opportunity to work through treatment.

    都是沒有機會擁有那種關係網絡的人,

  • And there are several reasons for this.

    因為他們在治療的過程中 都沒有機會工作。

  • But I think it mostly comes down to overly paternalistic employers.

    這背後有好幾個原因。

  • These employers want you to go away and focus on yourself.

    但我認為主要的原因是 僱主太過家長作風了。

  • And come back when you're better.

    這些僱主希望你走開, 專注在自己身上就好。

  • And they use those kinds of phrases.

    當你比較好之後再回來。

  • And while these responses are well-meaning,

    他們會用像那樣的說詞。

  • knowing the benefits it brought me,

    雖然他們的這些反應都是出於好意,

  • it makes me incredibly frustrated

    但我知道工作帶給我的益處,

  • when people are told that they couldn't or shouldn't work,

    所以當聽到癌症病人被告知

  • when it's something that they want to do and physically can do.

    他們不能或不該工作時, 我就會覺得非常灰心,

  • So I started to look into what an employer is required to do

    因為他們想要工作, 且身體上也能夠辦到。

  • when someone presents with a cancer diagnosis.

    所以我開始研究,當員工向僱主提出

  • I discovered that under Australian law, cancer is considered a disability.

    癌症診斷書時,僱主需要做什麼。

  • So if you are unable to perform your usual work duties,

    我發現,在澳洲法律中, 癌症被視為殘疾。

  • your employer is obligated by the Disability Discrimination Act

    所以,如果你無法進行 你平常的工作職責,

  • to make reasonable adjustments to your working arrangements,

    根據殘疾歧視法案,你的僱主有義務

  • so that you can continue to work.

    要針對你的工作安排做合理的調整,

  • What would reasonable adjustments look like for me?

    讓你能夠繼續工作。

  • I knew the obvious impacts my diagnosis was going to have on work.

    對我來說,合理的調整是什麼樣的?

  • Medical appointments would be scheduled during business hours,

    我知道我的診斷對於工作 會有哪些明顯的影響。

  • and I knew that I would need time off to recover from surgical procedures.

    醫療診治的時間都排訂在上班時段,

  • Again, being a typical lawyer,

    我也知道在手術之後 我會需要時間恢復。

  • I had done my due diligence on what to expect from treatment.

    同樣的,身為很典型的律師,

  • Admittedly, a lot of that was through Doctor Google,

    對於治療要有什麼樣的期待, 我已做了法律相關的盡職調查。

  • perhaps not my best move and I wouldn't recommend that.

    無可否認,許多調查 是通過 Google 教授做的,

  • (Laughter)

    那可能不是我最好的對策, 我不建議這麼做。

  • But while I was ready for all the physical side effects,

    (笑聲)

  • what really scared me was this thing called chemo brain.

    雖然我準備好迎接 所有身體上的副作用,

  • Chemo brain presents itself through memory loss,

    真正讓我害怕的, 是所謂的「化療腦」。

  • an inability to concentrate

    化療腦出現的形式包括記憶喪失、

  • and an inability to solve problems.

    無法專心,

  • And if this happened to me,

    以及無法解決問題。

  • I wondered how I was going to do my job as a lawyer.

    如果這發生在我身上,

  • Would I be forced to leave work?

    我不知道我要如何做我的律師工作。

  • And how could I possibly have a discussion with my manager

    我會被迫離開工作嗎?

  • about reasonable adjustments to my working arrangements

    我怎麼可能和我的經理討論

  • when I didn't know how I was going to be impacted?

    我的工作安排要做哪些合理調整,

  • I was fortunate to have a supportive manager

    如果我連我會如何被影響都不知道?

  • who was happy to see how things went as we went along,

    我很幸運,有個支持我的經理,

  • rather than requiring a concrete plan up front.

    他很樂意隨著發展再看狀況如何,

  • I was lucky that while he may not have even known

    而不是要求事前就要有具體的計畫。

  • about this concept of reasonable adjustments,

    我很幸運,他甚至可能不知道

  • to him, it was just common sense.

    這個合理調整的觀念,

  • But I've learned that it's not common sense to everyone.

    對他來說,這只是常識。

  • Everyone going through treatment will learn how it impacts them

    但我發現這並非對所有人都是常識。

  • and what their limitations are.

    所有要經歷治療的人, 都會了解到治療對他們的影響,

  • And they'll learn to adjust for that.

    以及他們的限制是什麼。

  • So for me, there were the tips and tricks that I learned about the treatment itself,

    他們會學會做相應的調整。

  • like, before you go to chemo,

    所以,對我來說,關於治療本身, 我學到了一些密訣和訣竅,

  • you need to make sure you're really well hydrated

    比如,在你去化療之前,

  • and that you're warm, because it helps the nurses to find your veins.

    你得要確保你自己有足夠的水分,

  • And make sure that you don't eat any of your favorite food,

    且要注意保暖,因為那樣 能協助護士找到你的靜脈。

  • either before or after chemo,

    還要確保你不吃任何你最愛的食物,

  • because you're going to be throwing that up

    化療前或化療後都不行,

  • and you won't ever want to look at it again.

    因為你會把它吐出來,

  • (Laughter)

    且你永遠不會想要再看它一眼了。

  • I learned that one the hard way.

    (笑聲)

  • And then there were the tricks for managing my workflow.

    這點我是從痛苦經驗學來的。

  • I scheduled chemo for first thing on a Monday morning.

    另外,還有關於管理 我的工作流程的訣竅。

  • I knew that from the time I left the cancer care unit,

    我把化療安排為 星期一早上的第一件事。

  • I had about four hours before this fog screen would come down

    我知道從我離開癌症照護單位之後,

  • and I would start to be sick.

    我會有大約四小時時間, 接著霧幕就會出現,

  • So I would use that time to clean my inbox and make any urgent calls.

    我就會開始不舒服。

  • The worst of the sickness would be gone within about 48 hours.

    我會用那段時間,清理我的 收件匣並打一些緊急的電話。

  • And then I would log back into work from home.

    最不舒服的狀況會在 48 小時以內就過去。

  • This treatment continued and I knew what to expect.

    接著我會從家中開始工作。

  • I was able to set reasonable expectations with my business partners

    治療繼續下去, 而我知道該預期什麼。

  • about what I could do

    我能夠和我的生意伙伴 設下合理的期望,

  • and the time frames that I could do it in.

    關於我能做些什麼,

  • But I still remember the hesitation in their voices

    以及我要多少時間來完成期望。

  • when it came to asking for things.

    但我還記得,他們帶著 遲疑的聲音來找我,

  • And asking me to do things by a certain time.

    要求我做一些事,

  • And trust me, these were people

    要求我在某個時限內完成事情。

  • that were not afraid of setting a good deadline.

    相信我,這些人都

  • (Laughter)

    不怕設下好的截止期限。

  • I got the impression they didn't want to put any extra pressure on me

    (笑聲)

  • while I was going through treatment.

    我的印象是,他們不想 在我身上增加額外的壓力,

  • And while I appreciated the sentiment,

    因為我一邊要接受治療。

  • I actually needed the deadlines.

    雖然我很感謝那樣的情操,

  • To me, that was something within my control

    我其實是需要截止期限的。

  • and something that could stay in my control

    對我來說,那是我能控制的東西,

  • when there were so many things that couldn't.

    且是我能持續控制的東西,

  • And as I was working from home,

    在這時期有太多我無法控制的了。

  • I was thinking about how employers should be applying this concept

    當我在家工作時,

  • of reasonable adjustments in our current age,

    我在想在我們目前 這個時代,僱主要如何把

  • where one in two Australian men and women

    這合理調整的概念實際應用出來,

  • will be diagnosed with cancer by the age of 85.

    現在,在澳洲,每兩位 男性及女性中就有一位,

  • So, as we continue to work longer and longer into older age,

    會在 85 歲之前被診斷出癌症。

  • the chances of having a serious illness while we're in the workforce

    隨著我們在職場上工作越久, 我們的年齡也在增長,

  • are increasing.

    在職場上工作時 得到嚴重疾病的可能性

  • And with technology enabling us to work anywhere, any time,

    也在增加。

  • reasonable adjustments are no longer contingent upon

    現在科技讓我們可以 在任何地方、任何時間工作,

  • whether or not you can continue to physically make it

    合理調整就不再受限於

  • into the physical office.

    你是否能持續實際去 實體的辦公室工作。

  • Reasonable adjustments are also not about

    合理調整的重點也不在於

  • just offering a longer break or a comfier chair to sit in,

    提供更長的休息時間 和更舒服的座椅,

  • although those things might be good, too.

    不過能有這些也不賴。

  • At the very least,

    最少,

  • we need to be applying the flexibility policies and strategies

    我們必須要能夠實施我們為其他情況

  • we've developed for other scenarios,

    發展出來彈性政策和策略,

  • like for people with family responsibilities.

    比如為了有家庭責任的人所發展的。

  • But how can we ensure that people are even having a conversation

    但我們要如何確保大家有機會進行

  • about what reasonable adjustments might look like for them

    怎樣合理調整才適合的對話,

  • if a manager's first response is to say,

    如果經理的第一個反應就是說:

  • "Oh no, don't come back to work until you're better."

    「喔,不,在你好轉之前 都別回來上班。」

  • And a light went on for me.

    而有一盞燈為我亮了起來。

  • It must be compulsory for managers

    經理和其旗下員工進行

  • to have to have these conversations with their employees.

    這類對談,必須要是強制性的。

  • And lessons from people like me,

    像我這樣子在治療過程中,

  • that have really benefited from working through treatment,

    持續工作而受益的人所學到的教訓,

  • need to be more widely shared.

    需要被廣泛分享出去。

  • And I thought about what could be done to guide these conversations,

    我思考過能怎樣引導這類對談,

  • and then an amazing colleague of mine, Camilla Gunn,

    然後我有一位了不起的同事 卡蜜拉甘恩(Camilla Gunn),

  • developed a "Working with Cancer" toolkit.

    發展出了一套 「帶著癌症工作」工具組。

  • The toolkit provides a framework for those diagnosed,

    這套工具組提供了一架構 給被診斷出癌症的人、

  • their managers, their carers and their coworkers

    他們的經理、他們的照護者, 以及他們的同事,

  • to have conversations about cancer and the work support available.

    讓他們能針對癌症 以及可得的工作支援進行對談。

  • Camilla and I have now been to other organizations

    卡蜜拉和我現在已經去過一些組織,

  • to talk about the toolkit

    去談這套工具組,

  • and how it can help to guide through

    以及它如何能協助引導大家

  • what, quite frankly, are otherwise some pretty awkward conversations.

    進行這些本來勢必會 相當尷尬的對談。

  • And I'm pleased to say that the uptake of the toolkit is increasing.

    我很高興能夠說, 越來越多人在使用這套工具組。

  • So what should be a manager's first response

    經理的第一個反應應該是什麼,

  • when somebody says that they're sick

    當聽到有人說他們生病了,

  • and they don't know how it's going to impact their work?

    且不知道這疾病會 如何影響他們的工作?

  • It must be this:

    經理的反應必須要是這樣的:

  • "To the extent that you are able, and want to,

    「在你能做到且想要做到的範圍內,

  • we would love to work out an arrangement for you

    我們很樂意為你做出安排,

  • to continue to work through treatment."

    讓你能在治療過程中持續工作。」

  • We need to start positively engaging people with serious illness

    我們需要開始積極吸引 患有嚴重疾病的人員,

  • to keep them in the workforce,

    讓他們繼續留在工作崗位上,

  • rather than paternalistically pushing them away.

    而不是採取家長式的態度推開他們。

  • I've told you my story because I want you to know the benefits

    我把我的故事告訴各位, 是因為我希望你們能夠了解

  • that working through treatment brought me.

    在治療期間持續工作帶給我的益處。

  • And I also want to change your perceptions

    我也想要改變各位的看法,

  • if you think that somebody going through treatment

    如果你們覺得在接受治療的人

  • is just bored, frail and vomiting a lot.

    就是感到厭倦、虛弱,和常常嘔吐。

  • And yes, these things were true some of the time,

    是的,的確,就算不是經常,

  • if not a lot of the time,

    至少也有時是這樣沒錯,

  • but I was also determined to push myself at work

    但我也下決心,要在工作上盡全力,

  • as much as I had always done.

    就像我過去一直以來那樣。

  • And I was able to do that because my employer gave me the choice.

    我之所以能夠做到, 是因為我的僱主給我這個選擇。

  • Most importantly, I'm telling you

    最重要的,我跟各位說這個故事,

  • because while it's a seemingly obvious choice to give someone,

    是因為,雖然似乎本來就 應該要給予這個選擇,

  • it's not one that is always offered or encouraged.

    通常,這個選擇卻沒有 被提供或被鼓勵提供。

  • And it must be.

    這是必須要做的。

  • Thank you.

    謝謝。

  • (Applause)

    (掌聲)

It was June 2014.

譯者: Lilian Chiu 審譯者: Yanyan Hong

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A2 初級 中文 美國腔 TED 工作 癌症 僱主 治療 調整

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