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  • The Ando family are not unique.

  • You see, Japanese families encourage

  • their children to travel to and from school alone

  • every single day.

  • By Western standards, Japanese culture

  • emphasises independence and self-reliance

  • from an extraodinarily young age.

  • In fact, one of Japan's most loved

  • and longest running TV shows,

  • is called My First Errand,

  • In which young children are given neighbourhood tasks,

  • and secretly filmed as they set about them alone,

  • sometimes even with a younger sibling in tow.

  • My First Errand is appealing

  • because all Japanese people had that experience

  • of having their parents entrust them to do

  • some simple job where they

  • leave the house on their own and they

  • come back to the house on their own.

  • And it's funny.

  • Jake Adelstein was the first Westerner to

  • work a crime beat in Japan.

  • giving him an insight into Japanese crime and justice

  • no other Westerner has.

  • He, like many foreigners,

  • noticed something different about Japan.

  • As I was walking to the station i would see

  • these young kids coming from the station

  • with their little backpacks on,

  • walking towards the school,

  • thiking, where are the adults?

  • Like, who is making sure these kids cross the road

  • and get to school okay?

  • Even my own daughter,

  • when she was about four or five,

  • and she said, I'm going to walk there myself.

  • And she left, and I put down the phone

  • and chased after her, and she ran all the way to school,

  • and of course nothing happened to her.

  • And I was like, you know?

  • Maybe in Japan that's how it works.

  • It's Monday morning on Sydney's affluent North Shore,

  • where the Frasier family are starting the day.

  • My name is Rob Fraser, I'm 47 years of age,

  • there's three of us in the family.

  • There's myself, there's Jane, and Emily, who is 10.

  • There's an apple in your bag Em.

  • Please don't leave the apple in your bag all week.

  • Am i turning lights off again?

  • Yes, you are.

  • All right.

  • Tennis raquet is in the car?

  • No, not yet.

  • Wow.

  • Um... it's cool.

  • i had a conversation with her the other day about

  • what would she like to do, would she like to get the bus to school,

  • would she like to go on her own.

  • She made it very clear that she would like to do that.

  • One thing I'm most looking forward to in high school

  • is walking home from school by myself,

  • And having a key and everything.

  • Give me a kiss?

  • I'll see you later.

  • In fact, studies show kids want to walk to school.

  • It's their parents that won't or can't.

  • The evidence is irrefutable -

  • that children are not safe to cross roads on their own

  • until they're ten.

  • That's why we're so nervous about children

  • being allowed to walk on their own to school,

  • though they might be on the footpath the whole way.

  • But it should be safe.

  • You see, Emily's School, Middle Harbour Public,

  • was the first to trial a 40 km p/h school zone

  • in Australia.

  • It's also a cultural reason.

  • If you look at the way Australians behave

  • when they reach a school zone,

  • I mean, a lot of people have one thing on their minds,

  • and that's themselves.

  • They don't care less about anyone else.

  • Group socialisation is huge in Japan.

  • Having parents pick up and drop off their kids

  • would be bad for Japan incorporated,

  • and that's one of the reasons you probably don't see it.

  • It's also one of the other reasons that Japan

  • and Japanese society is set up to make it safe for kids

  • to commute to school,

  • because if parents have to be responsible

  • for that commute,

  • they're going to have to reorganise

  • the entire workforce and the way companies work.

  • Japan, of course, has an exceptionally low crime rate.

  • They have more than five times our population

  • but less than four times the homocides we have.

  • I've covered very few cases of children being abducted.

  • Maybe one child death in the 12 years

  • I was a reporter.

  • That's the only one I encountered.

  • But to say kids go alone to school

  • because of a low crime rate

  • would miss more subtle and underlying forces.

  • Our society suffers from a paranoia

  • about leaving children on their own.

  • I think some of it is probably ill-perceived.

  • But a lot of it is understood.

  • I don't believe there's any more dangers now,

  • other than traffic,

  • than there were 30, 40 years ago.

  • I think the fact that it's more in the public eye,

  • it's in the press all the time,

  • I think also with the social pressure element

  • of letting go and letting them go and do things

  • at such a young age,

  • I think is actually quite difficult

  • to take on.

  • Kawaii ko literally means cute kid,

  • and tabi o saseyo means put them on a trip,

  • so the meaning is, if you love your kids,

  • or you want your kids to be smarter,

  • send them to do something, send them on a trip.

  • Kids are less independent nowdays.

  • it's just the way it is.

  • You have got me thinking about it.

  • You've got me thinking that maybe

  • I'm being a little bit paranoid.

The Ando family are not unique.

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A2 初級 美國腔

日本的獨立兒童I The Feed (Japan's independent kids I The Feed)

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    Kana kawai 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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