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  • Hi Rachel, I am going to Starbucks. Hey Rach, I’m going to Starbucks.

  • What's the difference between these two phrases?

  • In this American English pronunciation video,

  • you're going to learn a little more about the character of American English.

  • Contractions and reductions go a long way in making you sound more American.

  • But sometimes, I have a hard time convincing my students of this.

  • They think, "If I pronounce everything fully and clearly, it will be better."

  • But the problem with that is, it can end up sounding very formal,

  • sometimes even robotic, not at all natural.

  • You're going to hear the following conversation twice,

  • once with no contractions, no reductions, and only True T pronunciations.

  • It will sound formal and stilted.

  • Then, you'll hear the conversation as Americans would speak.

  • I hope you hear the huge difference that reductions,

  • contractions, and habits like the Flap T can make.

  • Hi Rachel, I am going to Starbucks. Hey Rach, I’m going to Starbucks.

  • HibecomesHey’. Not a reduction, but maybe a more casual greeting.

  • Tom usesRachinstead ofRachel’. A reduction of my name, a common nickname.

  • ‘I ambecomes, ‘I’m’. The wordtois reduced.

  • We have the Flap T and the schwa: going to, going to, going to Starbucks.

  • Hi Rachel, I am going to Starbucks. Hey Rach, I’m going to Starbucks.

  • Hi Rachel, I am going to Starbucks. Hey Rach, I’m going to Starbucks.

  • Do you want to come along? You wanna come along?

  • Do you’: ‘dois reduced so much that we almost don’t hear it. Just a light ‘D’ sound.

  • The vowel inYouisn’t quite a pure OO either.

  • It’s a little more relaxed, heading towards the schwa, d’you, d’you, d’you, do you wanna.

  • Want toreduces towanna’. Do you wanna, do you wanna.

  • Do you want to come along? You wanna come along?

  • Do you want to come along? You wanna come along?

  • No, thank you, Tom. No, thanks.

  • Thank youbecomesthanks’. One less syllable.

  • No, thank you, Tom. No, thanks.

  • No, thank you, Tom. No, thanks.

  • I have got too much I want to get done here. I’ve got too much I wanna get done here.

  • ‘I havebecomes ‘I’ve’. ‘Got to’: just one ‘T’ between those two words, got to, got to.

  • Want tobecomeswanna’, wanna.

  • Get’: we use the Stop T sound here, because the next sound is a consonant,

  • get done’, get done.

  • I have got too much I want to get done here. I’ve got too much I wanna get done here.

  • I have got too much I want to get done here. I’ve got too much I wanna get done here.

  • Okay, I will be back soon. Okay, I’ll be back soon.

  • ‘I willbecomes ‘I’ll’, reduced to I’ll.

  • Okay, I will be back soon. Okay, I’ll be back soon.

  • Okay, I will be back soon. Okay, I’ll be back soon.

  • Oh, I would love a coffee though. Oh, I’d love a coffee though.

  • ‘I wouldbecomes ‘I’d’.

  • Oh, I would love a coffee though. Oh, I’d love a coffee though.

  • Oh, I would love a coffee though. Oh, I’d love a coffee though.

  • Medium? That will be fine.

  • Medium? Thatll be fine.

  • That willbecomesthatll', a two-syllable word with stress on the first syllable.

  • The T at the end ofthatis a Flap T

  • because it comes between two vowels, thatll, thatll.

  • Medium? That will be fine.

  • Medium? Thatll be fine.

  • Medium? That will be fine.

  • Medium? Thatll be fine.

  • Great, see you in a bit. Great, see ya in a bit.

  • Great’, with a Stop T. This is because it’s the end of the sentence.

  • Youis more relaxed here, not an OO vowel but more a schwa, see ya, see ya.

  • And finallybitwith a stop T, bit, bit.

  • Again, because it’s coming at the end of the sentence.

  • Great, see you in a bit. Great, see ya in a bit.

  • Great, see you in a bit. Great, see ya in a bit.

  • So many options for reductions and contractions in such a short conversation.

  • Now let’s listen to the whole conversation, once without these tips, and once with.

  • What is your sense of the overall character?

  • Formal - T: Hi Rachel, I am going to Starbucks. Do you want to come along?

  • R: No, thank you, Tom. I have got too much I want to get done here.

  • T: Okay, I will be back soon. R: Oh, I would love a coffee though.

  • T: Medium? R: That will be fine.

  • T: Great, see you in a bit.

  • Informal - T: Hey Rach, I’m going to Starbucks, you wanna come along?

  • R: No, thanks. I’ve got too much I wanna get done here.

  • T: Okay, I’ll be back soon. R: Oh, I’d love a coffee though.

  • T: Medium? R: Thatll be fine.

  • T: Great, see ya in a bit.

  • To keep going with this, go back and listen to the conversation

  • when it sounded American and natural.

  • Turn it into a Ben Franklin exercise

  • and then practice the conversation with a friend, or by yourself.

  • If you're not sure what a Ben Franklin exercise is, click here or look in the description.

  • That's it, and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

Hi Rachel, I am going to Starbucks. Hey Rach, I’m going to Starbucks.

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B2 中高級 美國腔

Contractversation -- Going to Starbucks -- American English Pronunciation(美式英語發音) (Contractversation -- Going to Starbucks -- American English Pronunciation)

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    呵呵 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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