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  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • I was going to try to...

  • A shoe and a book joke, but I didn't think it would go well.

  • But Mr. E is saying to me: "I gotta hand it to you." Right?

  • "You tried."

  • Yeah, I did try.

  • Unfortunately I failed.

  • Today I want to teach you about body parts as verbs, and how certain parts of our body,

  • from our hands to our mouths, to our heads can be used as verbs and have a meaning.

  • Now, before I go any further, I want to say two things.

  • Thank you to Baz and Tomo.

  • Thanks, guys, you made this lesson possible with some of your suggestions.

  • And if you guys have suggestions for me at all for lessons, please, don't hesitate.

  • Go to engVid, www.engvid.com, and just say, you know: "Can you teach this, this, and this?"

  • or "Could you help us with...?" and you might get your name on the board.

  • Now, I'm going to move on to our lesson, but just to point out because you grammar heads

  • out there will say: "He wrote 'gotta', and that's not a word in English."

  • You're right, this is slang.

  • But I'm saying: "You gotta hand it to me", because I'm using one of these body parts

  • as a verb right there: "hand it", it means have got to.

  • "I have got to hand it to you."

  • But in English, we say: "gotta" because it's faster and simpler. Right?

  • So: "I have got to hand it to you" is very formal, "I gotta hand it to you" is very natural.

  • Keep that in mind.

  • If you're writing, write: "I have got to", but if you're speaking, you could say to a

  • Canadian: "I gotta get going now", and they'll understand you have to go.

  • Cool? All right. Moving on.

  • First things we want to talk about, and I tried to do this in order with your body so

  • you will remember the order.

  • "Head", I have a head.

  • I cannot walk like this, it doesn't make sense.

  • I turn my head in the direction I'm going.

  • So, when somebody says: "Where are you heading?" they're saying: "I see your head is going

  • in this direction.

  • To where are you going?"

  • So: "heading" means direction.

  • "He was heading to his house", that means the direction he was going of his house.

  • "She was heading to the store", she was going in the direction of the store.

  • Number one: "heading".

  • Number two: "eyeball".

  • "To eyeball somebody" is to look at them.

  • Usually used in a negative sense.

  • If someone says to you: "Are you eyeballing me?"

  • It means: "Are you staring at me or looking at me?

  • Because I don't like how you look at me, okay?

  • Stop doing it." Okay?

  • So: "to eyeball someone".

  • Maybe you, you know...

  • Sometimes you've seen women look at other women, and they look them up and down, like:

  • "Look at her."

  • They're eyeballing, because you can see their eyes moving and checking them out.

  • Or guys eyeball each other, like: "Yeah, he thinks he's tough", and they eyeball you.

  • Okay?

  • Number two: "to eyeball".

  • Number three: "neck".

  • I'm not a vampire, I don't...

  • I don't want to bite you and get your blood, but "necking" isn't when two people put their

  • necks together, but "necking" is kissing, but long-time kissing, so it's like you're

  • with your partner: "[Kisses]".

  • "Necking", okay?

  • So that's why I have two lips, because they're kissing and that's why the two people are

  • happy because messing...

  • Messing.

  • [Laughs] Kissing means...

  • "Necking" means long-term kissing or long-time kissing and passionate kissing.

  • Okay?

  • Number four: "mouth off".

  • You can see the mouth is jumping off of a box.

  • Let me finish that box, it doesn't look like a full box, there.

  • So it's jumping off a box.

  • "Mouth off" is to say things, like: "Get out of here.

  • I don't care."

  • It's being rude.

  • Being rude, maybe sometimes using slang towards someone.

  • So, for example, if your dad were to say: "Hey, could you pick up the box?"

  • And you go: "Yo, old man, why don't you pick up the box?

  • You're bigger than me, you should pick up..."

  • You're mouthing off.

  • I would say: "Stop mouthing off.

  • Stop being rude."

  • Okay?

  • Or: "...talking back to me like that".

  • "Mouthing off".

  • "Shoulder", "shoulder a burden", that's just one example, but when you shoulder something,

  • like a responsibility, it means you carry it with you.

  • You carry it with you.

  • So if you're shouldering many responsibilities, maybe you are a student, maybe you're trying

  • to learn English, maybe you have a job, maybe you have a fam-...

  • That's a lot of things to put on your shoulders.

  • Because shoulders are used to carry, so you're carrying a lot of these things on your shoulder.

  • Okay?

  • Next one, number six: "armed".

  • Dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh.

  • "Arm", this is your arm.

  • We say: "armed" to mean have a weapon, like a gun.

  • "Pewng."

  • That's a phaser, by the way, from Star Trek.

  • "Pewng, pewng, pewng, plewng."

  • Or a sword.

  • "Ta-ching, ching."

  • Even a knife.

  • You can use a pen as a weapon.

  • In fact, to be honest, if you're armed, you could use words as weapons.

  • It's anything that can hurt someone, we say they were armed.

  • Right?

  • So if you're not very smart, you might not be well-armed in an argument.

  • Sorry, it's funny.

  • Really, it is.

  • But think of "armed" being a weapon, like a gun, or a knife, or a sword.

  • Okay?

  • So, are the...

  • Were the people armed?

  • Did they have weapons?

  • "Elbow", that's this part of your arm, the elbow.

  • See that part?

  • That's your elbow.

  • Okay?

  • Now, I don't know where you are in the world, but Canadians will know this one and Americans,

  • but if you elbow somebody in hockey it means to hit them with your elbow.

  • So: "elbowing" usually means to either hit somebody with this part of your body, or to

  • push your way into a situation.

  • And it means there's physical contact or a little bit of violence, because if I elbow

  • into the room, it means I'm going: "Excuse me.

  • Excuse me.

  • Excuse me", and I use these to get room.

  • Or if I elbow past you, you're standing there and I go: "Excuse me, got to go", and I will

  • hit you with my elbow to make you move.

  • All right?

  • But if you watch hockey, elbows happen all the time.

  • Okay?

  • So: "elbow someone".

  • Now, because this is YouTube I'm going to give you the finger, but it's not this finger,

  • it's another finger.

  • This finger here, but I'm not allowed to show it on network TV, or kids...

  • The kids' channel.

  • So: "give someone the finger" is not this finger...

  • Okay, don't use this finger, don't use this finger, don't use this finger, don't use this

  • finger, use this one.

  • But I have to illustrate it like that.

  • It means to tell someone to go away in a very strong way.

  • In fact, you might say it's the F-word.

  • You can go find it out for yourself.

  • But if you go like this: "Hey, you", and I give you the finger, I probably will have

  • to run away because you're going to probably want to hit me back.

  • Okay?

  • So, go figure out what "the finger" is.

  • Number nine: "butt in line".

  • Okay, I don't know if you can see my butt - that's my bum-bum, but you can't see it.

  • So, hang on a second.

  • The things I do for engVid.

  • Okay.

  • Dunh-dunh-dunh.

  • Okay, so, that is my butt.

  • Get a good look.

  • Okay?

  • "To butt in line" means to take this thing and to push your way in line.

  • What do I mean?

  • I mean there is a line...

  • Sorry, give me a second.

  • Told you, all the stuff I do for engVid.

  • There is a line and everyone's lined up nicely, and you're like...

  • Remember "elbow"?

  • You go: "Excuse me", and people go: -"You can't butt in line.

  • Your butt has to go back with everyone else at the end."

  • -"Damn it."

  • Because if you butt in line, you try to get in line when you shouldn't.

  • Don't try that in England - the queue is everything.

  • You do that England, they'll all say: "Excuse me?

  • Right, you can't butt in line."