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  • - I had a good year last year, but am I successful?

  • And the answer, is no.

  • I don't feel I am,

  • because I am trying to build a world that doesn't exist yet.

  • When you're driving in your car,

  • and you get a text, and your phone goes beep,

  • we hate email, true.

  • We love the beep, the buzz, the ding.

  • - Have you gone and talked to

  • a company that's been in trouble,

  • and then spoken to their team,

  • and then checked in on them

  • after you've spoke to their leadership team,

  • and what did that look like?

  • Did you notice a noticeable change?

  • - You mean, does my (audio cuts out) work?

  • (audience laughing)

  • - Hello, Believe Nation!

  • I'm Evan Carmichael, my one word is believe,

  • and I believe that entrepreneurs are going to solve

  • all of the world's major problems.

  • So, to help you on your journey,

  • today, we're going to learn from

  • author and speaker, Simon Sinek,

  • and my take on his top 10 rules for success, volume two.

  • Rule number five is my personal favorite,

  • and I'd love to know which one you guys like the best.

  • And as always, as you're listening,

  • if something really resonates with you,

  • there's a message that really holds true to you,

  • please leave it down in the comments below

  • and put it in quotes

  • so that other people can be inspired.

  • And when you write it down,

  • it's much more likely to stick with yourself as well.

  • Enjoy.

  • (loud whoosh)

  • (dramatic orchestral music)

  • - People are always talking about

  • visions and missions and all this stuff.

  • And, when people ask me,

  • "What example should I look to, what company?"

  • I'm like, here's an organization with a vision, a cause.

  • It was founded with a cause.

  • It's an entrepreneurial venture.

  • America is an experiment.

  • It's an entrepreneurial venture

  • where a bunch of people got together and decided

  • we needed to start our own country

  • because there were certain obstacles

  • that were getting in the way of the vision that we had

  • of a better kind of country, a kind of company, right?

  • And they stated it right out of the beginning,

  • "All men are created equal,"

  • endowed with these inalienable rights,

  • amongst which include life, liberty,

  • and the pursuit of happiness.

  • And it's not just a competitive statement,

  • like, "To be the best.

  • "To be the most respected."

  • That's not what it was.

  • And I'm amazed how many companies

  • start their visions or missions with those,

  • that terribly egocentric language.

  • It was an ideal.

  • And the amazing thing is

  • we've been good at it and bad at it in our history,

  • but it's endured for 240 plus years

  • because we fundamentally believe

  • that we are at our best when we're pursuing that.

  • But it is an ideal.

  • We will never achieve all people are equal,

  • but we will die trying, and that's the point.

  • And it's the same for a company,

  • which is true vision inside a company

  • is something that has nothing to do with your product.

  • It is an ideal to which you will

  • attempt to build and advance that ideal

  • through your company with your product.

  • You will never achieve the ideal but you'll die trying.

  • And this is what gives our work meaning.

  • This is what gives our lives purpose.

  • The difference between a vision and a goal

  • is the finish line.

  • A goal is 26.2 miles.

  • You can simply count the metrics

  • and know when you completed your goal.

  • A vision is having a crystal clear sense

  • of what the finish line looks like

  • but no idea of how far away it is.

  • And the reality is, you will spend your entire life

  • never actually crossing the finish line,

  • but the joy that every marathon you complete

  • you feel like you're getting closer

  • and every milestone that you accomplish

  • makes you feel like you're getting

  • closer and closer to the ideal,

  • and this is what gives our life and our work meaning.

  • Success is an elusive thing, right?

  • What is it?

  • And I think it's very interesting

  • that if most people kind of define success,

  • "Well, it means you've made X amount of dollars,"

  • but if you make X amount of dollars but you spend more,

  • are you successful?

  • Or, "Well, it means you come home happy every day."

  • Okay, how do you know when you're happy?

  • So I think success is a funny thing,

  • which is we all seem to pursue it,

  • but we don't know how to measure it

  • or actually how to define it.

  • So how do you pursue something that you can't measure?

  • Fascinating.

  • So when people say to me, "How do you measure success?"

  • the question we all have to ask ourselves, am I successful?

  • I don't know.

  • I had a good year last year.

  • And what does that mean?

  • Does it mean I made a lot of money?

  • Does it mean I was really happy?

  • Well, I'll let you decide.

  • Maybe neither, maybe both.

  • I had a good year last year, but am I successful?

  • And the answer, is no.

  • I don't feel I am,

  • because I am trying to build a world that doesn't exist yet.

  • I'm trying to build a world in which

  • 90% of people go home at the end of the day

  • feeling fulfilled by the work that they do.

  • So I definitely took a big step forward towards that goal,

  • but I'm still so far away.

  • So somebody said to me,

  • "How do you know if you're successful?"

  • And the answer is if it can go by itself.

  • And so what is more interesting to me

  • as a measurement of success is not the markers per se.

  • It's not the financial goal

  • or the size of the house that you want to buy.

  • Those are nice things.

  • Go for it.

  • But those are not measurements of success.

  • Those are just nice things to collect along the way.

  • For me, it's momentum.

  • I want to measure momentum, which is,

  • when something is moving

  • and you start to see it lose momentum,

  • you're like, "Uh-oh, give it a push,"

  • because if you don't give it a push it's going to stop,

  • and an object in stasis is much harder to get going.

  • It requires a lot more energy to get something started

  • than it does to keep it going, right?

  • And so if you don't let it stop and you can keep it going,

  • it still might slow down down there,

  • but you can get it going again much easier.

  • And for me, the opportunity is to get the ball rolling

  • faster and faster and faster and faster and faster

  • and bigger and bigger and bigger.

  • It's like a snowball.

  • And my responsibility is,

  • because it's not rolling downhill yet,

  • it's not on automatic yet,

  • I need to still keep it going and find that critical mass

  • where it can go (imitates explosion)

  • And at the point it can go by itself without me,

  • then I will find something else to do.

  • And that may not happen in my lifetime.

  • I think we must all stop measuring

  • promotions, salaries, and these things,

  • but rather measure the momentum of your career.

  • Does my career have momentum?

  • Can I see it moving in the right direction?

  • Can I see it gathering mass?

  • Can I see that it's becoming

  • easier for me to keep the momentum,

  • it's becoming easier for me to grow the size of this thing,

  • it's requiring less effort?

  • That's the thing we need to measure.

  • That's the thing that we need to be cognizant of,

  • which is the momentum of our careers,

  • not just the markers that we think define our success.

  • I did a little experiment with a homeless person.

  • Not like on them.

  • It's not like electrodes.

  • (audience laughs)

  • With them, voluntarily helped me.

  • Because the whole idea of giving, right?

  • You've all walked down the street

  • and you've all seen someone begging,

  • and you either have or haven't

  • thrown a few pennies in their cup.

  • When you do, you feel good.

  • You bought that feeling.

  • That is a legitimate commercial transaction.

  • Commercial transactions are defined as

  • the exchange of consideration.

  • There was an exchange of consideration here.

  • You gave money.

  • You got the feeling of goodwill.

  • You paid for that feeling.

  • If you didn't give money,

  • you either feel nothing or you feel bad.

  • You can't feel good by not giving.

  • You pay for that feeling.

  • So now the question is,

  • how is that person encouraging us to give?

  • The joke is, they act like every corporation in the world.

  • They talk about themselves.

  • "Me, me, me, me, me, me, me."

  • Right?

  • They sit there with their little outdoor advertising,

  • little sign, right?

  • And it says, "I'm homeless.

  • "I'm hungry.

  • "I've got 12 kids.

  • "I'm a veteran.

  • "God bless."

  • They got it all in there, trying to appeal to somebody,

  • the religious vote, the veteran vote, child sympathizers,

  • surround yourself with lots of pets, go for that one, too.

  • Right?

  • All in an attempt to get something from someone.

  • Takers, not givers, right?

  • All about me.

  • Well, what do corporations do?

  • "We've added more RAM.

  • "We've added more ROM.

  • "We've added more speed.

  • "This one is number one.

  • "We're the biggest. We're the best.

  • "We've been around since 1969.

  • "We're better than them.

  • "We're faster than them.

  • "We're more efficient than that one.

  • "Me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me, me."

  • And so even if we buy their product, guess what?

  • We don't really feel much.

  • So I did this little experiment.

  • I found a nice homeless lady on the streets of New York

  • who was willing to help out.

  • And I learned that with her sign, which was pretty typical,

  • "I'm homeless, I'm hungry, blah, blah, blah,"

  • she makes between 20 and 30 dollars a day

  • for a day's worth of work,

  • eight to 10 hours of sitting there selling goodwill.

  • Eight to 10 hours, she'll make 20 to 30 dollars.

  • 30 dollars is considered a good day.

  • I changed her sign,

  • and the new sign made her 40 dollars in two hours.

  • And then she left.

  • (audience laughs)

  • It's one of the reasons she's homeless,

  • is 'cause she's decided that she only needs

  • 20 to 30 dollars a day to live.

  • If she'd stayed, she would've made $150.

  • The point is, she made 40 bucks in two hours.

  • What did the sign say?

  • The sign said, "If you only give once a month,

  • "please think of me next time."