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  • (suspenseful music)

  • (electrical buzzing)

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  • (peaceful music)

  • - [Kris] Hey, what's up, guys?

  • This is Kris Truini for Kriscoart Productions,

  • and welcome to this tutorial which will cover

  • the basics of After Effects.

  • I know it's not the most exciting tutorial

  • that you've ever seen,

  • but in order to get to the fun stuff,

  • we need to get the basics out of the way.

  • Now, I know that this interface looks pretty intimidating,

  • but once you get the basic mechanism of it

  • and you know where everything is,

  • everything else builds upon that basic knowledge.

  • In other words, this tutorial will try to include

  • all the basic needs to get you started into one video.

  • All right, enough talking about the tutorial.

  • Let's actually jump into it.

  • So the first thing that we see in this interface

  • is that it's divided into panels.

  • You have your Project panel over here,

  • which also shares the Effects Controls panel.

  • The Project panel is where all your media,

  • which can be footage, audio, images,

  • anything like that will be stored here.

  • Anything that you use will be imported in the Project panel.

  • Right next to it, there's a Composition panel.

  • This is pretty much your monitor.

  • This is where everything

  • that you do in your timeline will appear.

  • Before we start exploring the rest of these panels,

  • let's actually import some footage

  • so that we can get a better understanding

  • of what everything does with an actual example.

  • So to import your footage,

  • you can either double click into this Project panel area,

  • and this will open up this Import File window,

  • or you can import files through File, Import,

  • File, or Multiple Files.

  • So you see they'll pretty much give you the same thing.

  • Or, if you have a folder open already

  • with the footage that you need,

  • you can simply just drag it over onto this box

  • or into the Project panel area.

  • Okay, so we now have some footage imported,

  • and you can see that there is some basic information here.

  • It gives you the resolution, the frame rate,

  • the amount of colors, and the type of compression

  • that this video has.

  • So, moving on from here,

  • what you wanna do is create a new composition.

  • There are a couple of ways of doing this.

  • You can either drag the footage onto this little icon here,

  • which will create a composition

  • based on the settings of the footage.

  • So it'll have the same frame rate, the same resolution.

  • Now, another way to do this

  • is to go under Composition, New Composition.

  • You can notice that the shortcut for that is Command + N.

  • For PC users, I'm pretty sure it's Control + N.

  • Okay, so now that we have a composition created,

  • let's look at other ways to import files onto your timeline.

  • So what I have here is a simple picture

  • that I'm gonna import.

  • So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna create for this example

  • a small logo overlay in the lower third of this video.

  • So there are two different ways to bring this image

  • into our timeline and see it in our Composition panel.

  • One way is to actually select it

  • and drag it over the composition panel.

  • And you can see that this little box appears,

  • and what that is is pretty much the size of the image.

  • So we can see that up here it's 900 by 900,

  • and that's actually what's showing

  • into our Composition panel.

  • And you can pretty much drag it anywhere you would like,

  • and as soon as you let go, it'll place it in that position.

  • Now, the other way is a little bit different,

  • because instead of working on where you wanna place it,

  • it works on when you wanna place it.

  • So you can see that this black line forms

  • soon as we drag it over to the Timeline panel,

  • and that is because you're telling it first

  • if it should be on top of the clip or under the clip.

  • If you place it under the clip, you're not gonna see it

  • because our footage is actually covering it up.

  • But if we bring it up by selecting it,

  • bringing it on top of the clip,

  • you can actually see that it appears over our footage.

  • Now, another important thing of this technique is that,

  • let's say I'm dragging it over,

  • you not only get to choose in what order it is placed,

  • but you also get to choose when in time it is placed.

  • So once again, if you drag it over the Composition panel,

  • you're choosing where your item is placed,

  • but if you drag it over the Timeline panel,

  • you choose when it is placed.

  • Now, if you notice,

  • whenever you drag an element onto the Timeline panel,

  • this secondary timeline indicator knob appears,

  • and that's pretty much telling you

  • where the beginning of that layer will be placed in time.

  • Okay, so again, it's very basic stuff,

  • but we're actually getting somewhere.

  • We're starting to get more comfortable with After Effects.

  • However, if you have a short attention span like me,

  • I think it's probably time for a break.

  • So here's some slow motion stock footage for your enjoyment

  • mixed in with some dubstep.

  • Enjoy.

  • (dubstep music)

  • All right.

  • I feel much better.

  • So, let's get back to work.

  • So once again, what we were trying to do in this example

  • is to create a lower thirds looking logo overlay.

  • Instead of having the logo appear over here,

  • I'm just gonna drag it back to the beginning

  • so that we immediately see it.

  • And the next thing we gotta do is pretty much scale it down

  • and position it down in the bottom.

  • So there's a couple ways to do this,

  • like most things in After Effects.

  • One is to shrink it or resize it or stretch it

  • with these little points on the edges of the picture.

  • Or you can click one of those points and hold Shift,

  • and that will uniformly scale the element.

  • Another way to scale layers is to select them

  • and hit S on your keyboard.

  • That will bring up the scale property of that layer.

  • So over here, you can see that we can click

  • and just drag it in and out.

  • Or, if you want, you can select it

  • and type in the value that you would like.

  • All right, so let's scale it down to what we want,

  • so I'd say that's pretty good.

  • And we wanna position it down here.

  • So all you gotta do is just click the layer

  • and drag it over.

  • Now let's say you have

  • many layers and elements in your composition

  • and you can't really click them.

  • Well, just how we brought up the scale over here,

  • you can select it and hit P,

  • and that will bring up the position of the layer.

  • And then you have the X and Y coordinates

  • and you can drag

  • and position the layer

  • where you want it to be.

  • Now, while we're here,

  • let me just mention a few other things.

  • You now know that with hitting S, you bring up scale,

  • hitting P, you bring up position.

  • Well, here's a couple other ones.

  • If you hit R, it brings up rotation,

  • and you can actually rotate your layers.

  • If you hit T, it'll bring up the opacity.

  • And opacity is pretty much how transparent your layer is.

  • So if you bring that down,

  • you can see that we start seeing more of what's behind it.

  • Another cool keyboard shortcut is

  • instead of seeing them individually,

  • if you hold Shift, you can actually bring more than one up.

  • Okay, so before we move on

  • to animating some of these properties,

  • let's actually see a couple other keyboard shortcuts

  • that can help you import things quicker

  • and work with your timeline a little bit faster.

  • So let's say you wanna import something

  • down in the middle of your composition.