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  • A Practical Strategy for Communicating RBE Concepts by Jen Wilding

  • Hi. OK.

  • By a quick show of hands, how many people in this room have introduced

  • somebody to the concept of a resource-based economic model

  • and as a result

  • you received a response of sincere gratitude from the person?

  • You were told "Thank you for sharing this with me."

  • OK, good.

  • I don't know how many of you have actually shared.

  • How many of you have shared this with other people?

  • OK, so not everyone has received that response.

  • Hopefully I'm going to help you out with that.

  • How many people may have received feedback at all

  • similar to this note of gratitude I'm going to read to you:

  • "I just want to thank you for posting the facebook status:

  • 'WAKE UP YOU IGNORANT SHEEPLES BEFORE WE ALL DIE'

  • followed by eleven exclamation points

  • because if you hadn't done that, myself, my wife and two children

  • might not had watched the 14 YouTube links

  • you posted in the two hours following that

  • and thus discovered this new resource-based economic paradigm

  • information that has been life-changing for us.

  • I shudder to think that if your status

  • had been typed in lower case letters instead of all caps

  • we might still be in the dark today about solutions

  • that offer encouraging possibilities to all mankind."

  • I don't think any of you identify with that, fortunately.

  • This is not a real post but

  • unfortunately it was modeled after some people's real posts

  • (no one here, I'm sure).

  • I bring this up as an extreme example

  • of how our strategy for communicating information

  • has a direct impact on whether or not someone is open to considering

  • the information you have to offer.

  • I bring this up as an extreme example

  • to illustrate that in particular.

  • And what's... even though this is nothing new

  • (that the way you communicate makes a difference)

  • as a US coordinator one of the most frequent questions

  • I'm asked by people is "How do I communicate this information

  • in a way that my friends, relatives and coworkers

  • will be more likely to receive it?"

  • I've been invited to offer some advice

  • to perhaps optimize your communication strategy

  • which I offer to you in six parts.

  • Part 1: Adjusting Your Expectations

  • When trying to contribute to an evolution

  • you have to consider a major component that has been prevalent

  • in our own existing evolution up until now

  • and that is a component

  • that humans have a history of exhibiting symptoms of

  • and that is

  • neophobia.

  • Actually not this kind, a different kind.

  • By that I mean the fear of new things or experiences.

  • As a related condition, there is a related condition also

  • called the 'status quo bias' which is very similar to that.

  • I'm sure you have experience with people who

  • are exhibiting both neophobia and perhaps the status quo bias.

  • Neophobia: the fear of new things or experiences;

  • Status Quo Bias: a cognitive bias for the status quo;

  • in other words, people tend not to change

  • an already established behavior.

  • They tend to go with default programming

  • and traditionally this fear of new things

  • is somewhat indigenous to our human limbic system

  • which is related to our emotion and memory mind

  • and has been helpful in keeping us in an evolutionary sense

  • from an early demise as a result of eating unfamiliar berries

  • that might be poisonous.

  • Yet, as we are discovering

  • it has been decidedly unhelpful

  • when needing to update crippled socio-economic systems.

  • And

  • here are some potential causes of neophobia and status quo bias:

  • risk aversion, regret avoidance, transactional costs

  • and psychological commitment or learning curve.

  • Here's an example of neophobia at its finest in history.

  • It is from an article called 'Enhancing Humanity'

  • written by a professor Raymond Tallis:

  • "In Victorian times, it was anticipated that

  • going through a dark tunnel in a train at high speed

  • (30 mph or 48km/h)

  • would be such a shocking experience that

  • people would come out the other side irreversibly damaged."

  • This was an actual fear of travel by rail.

  • This is what you're working with

  • and so when I say adjust your expectations

  • just know that it's a natural part of humans

  • a part of our evolution even

  • to be skeptical of new things

  • because they may not be good for us.

  • Knowing this challenge, how can we enhance

  • our communication strategy to be more effective?

  • To answer this question we can look to other information

  • about human behavior for clues

  • so I'm going to ask you this:

  • Can you guess the most addictive human behavior?

  • No, it's not cigarette smoking.

  • It's not eating sweets.

  • Although breathing is a good one I don't think it made the list.

  • Drinking coffee, no.

  • - [from audience] Sex.

  • - It came close.

  • [laughing]

  • We know Shar's vote.

  • Being right! ... being right.

  • OK, so there was no formal study per se.

  • It was more an informal survey of a few close friends

  • but I think the results have merit in this conversation

  • and I'll actually dare you to prove me wrong.

  • Stay with me because this is leading us into part two

  • which is...

  • Part 2: Adopt the Quality of 'Brilliant'.

  • Didn't you know you could do this?

  • As many of you know, this is something that is desirable:

  • adopting the quality of 'brilliant'.

  • Let's think about what that's actually comprised of.

  • Maybe this is something you've heard or perhaps said about someone

  • an author or speaker that you have thought was brilliant:

  • "This guy (or gal) is saying some of the same things

  • I've been telling people for years!

  • He (or she) puts it all together so well;

  • he (or she) is therefore brilliant!"

  • Do you see the connection? Right?

  • If you were to go to that in your mind

  • you might had even said that about Peter Joseph

  • as I know many of you are perhaps here

  • as a result of watching his movies.

  • I hear this said about him all the time.

  • I had this thought about him at the time.

  • Basically it comes down to this: It really feels good to be right

  • and we tend to listen to people who make us right

  • basically who validate an aspect of our existing view of the world.

  • I want to talk about belief systems, our view of the world:

  • belief systems as a worldview.

  • This is sort of a map and note:

  • "The map is not the territory" ... famously [Korzybski].

  • Since we are born, we begin developing our worldview:

  • how the world works, what our relationship to the world is.

  • In order for us to first learn something new

  • we need to have some orientation of the new idea

  • to our current worldview or reference.

  • A wise friend once told me that he'd heard

  • that the ultimate sign of intelligence in a person

  • was having the ability to honestly try on another person's worldview

  • a different opposing view, temporarily, without any fear

  • of an obligation to take it on as his own

  • just trying it on and seeing how that person thinks.

  • I want you to imagine how the effort of trying on

  • the worldview of others can contribute to your communication.

  • How can you adopt this quality of 'brilliant'?

  • You can set out to make someone 'right'

  • instead of make them 'wrong'

  • and try to start out with agreement.

  • You do this by finding and acknowledging shared values

  • within their existing worldview.

  • Why does this work?

  • Because it gives us those good feelings.

  • It gives that person a sense of "Wow, this person

  • does have some good points on this particular aspect."

  • Some keys to natural 'brilliance' are

  • that you really need to be a good listener

  • in a conversation with someone

  • so that you can learn what their worldview is;

  • find out what's important to them.

  • You want to find areas of authentic agreement

  • and then contribute authentic agreement to the conversation.

  • Basically it means that 'authentic' piece of 'it's important'

  • because I know when someone is being fake with me