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  • TOMMY: In this video, we're going to give you two disabilities for the price of the one.

  • [swoosh / music plays] TOMMY: Here's a question I've been hearing a lot:

  • "How does a blind person communicate with somebody's who deaf?"

  • Well, today I'd like demonstrate a couple of methods and we can show you how it works.

  • Now I'm joined by deaf YouTuber Rikki Poynter.

  • RIKKI: Yeah, I'm Rikki. I'm a YouTuber who is deaf. I make videos about

  • deaf awareness, closed captioning awareness,

  • and then some social justice issues

  • with the occasional Pokemon thrown in. TOMMY: And what's the cause

  • of your deafness? RIKKI: It's pretty much genetic. The person

  • who I was born from, she was deaf at the age of three and then

  • as my hearing loss gradually came about it just made

  • the most logical sense that it came from her.

  • TOMMY: Oh, just lucky I guess, right? RIKKI: Oh, so lucky.

  • RIKKI: No, no, no, really it's not a bad thing. It's not.

  • TOMMY: The methods we're going to show you today depend on the severity of

  • somebody's hearing or vision loss. So in my case for example,

  • I'm blind since birth so I can't see a thing. RIKKI: I've been deaf

  • since I was 12. My hearing loss

  • really goes by decibels but I don't know that so

  • if we went by percentages... this ear, the hearing

  • is almost extinct, but in my

  • left side it's more of half there

  • still. Somewhere around there.

  • [music plays]

  • TOMMY: One method is talk to directly to Rikki.

  • Because she's got some hearing in her left ear she might be able

  • to hear me, but can you also read lips too?

  • RIKKI: Not really. When it comes to the English language

  • only 30 to 40 percent of the language can be read

  • on the lips easily and that's only under the best conditions.

  • For me, I can get the most common phrases like,

  • "Hi, how are you?

  • "Hi, how are you?" Stuff like that. But really

  • I'm trying to focus on what actual sound

  • is being said rather than

  • trying to read their lips. For me, I kind of hope for the best

  • and then try to use both methods at the same time.

  • [music plays]

  • RIKKI: So another way of communicating is using an interpreter.

  • If you don't know what an interpreter is, it's somebody who knows sign language.

  • So our friend Andrea over here is

  • going to be interpreting what I say to Tommy and

  • she's also going to be interpreting what he says to me.

  • For example... ANDREA: Tommy, how do you edit your videos?

  • TOMMY: I don't edit them. Ben does.

  • RIKKI: Oh, cool. ANDREA: Cool.

  • [music continues]

  • TOMMY: Now if you don't have an interpreter another method you could use

  • is tactile signing. Now what that means is I can put my hand

  • on Rikki's hand and say something to her

  • and she can put her hand back on mine and respond to what I say.

  • So for the sake of this video I just learned a couple things. So let me try one

  • for you. Ready? Here we go.

  • So I said, "how are you?" And she goes, "fine."

  • Pretty cool, right? RIKKI: Right.

  • ANDREA: That was so cute.

  • [music plays] RIKKI: So probably the easiest way of communicating

  • is through technology using a smartphone or a computer.

  • Personally my favorite app is called Make It Big.

  • All you have to do is you can write messages,

  • press done, the text is really big.

  • And you could also speak into the app and it will show the words for you.

  • TOMMY: Now for me, there's a thing on the iPhone called VoiceOver

  • and that's basically a screen reader. So I can dictate and it will say

  • what I've dictated and it will read back what Rikki's written to me.

  • IPHONE: Dictate.

  • TOMMY: Is this video over yet, question mark.

  • IPHONE: Inserted "Is this video over yet?"

  • Done. Done.

  • IPHONE: I hope so. TOMMY: Me too. [chuckles]

  • TOMMY: Hey Rikki, thanks a lot for doing this video with us. It was awesome.

  • I appreciate you. RIKKI: Thank you for having me.

  • TOMMY: No, no problems. And if you want to go check out

  • Rikki, please subscribe to her channel.

  • It's fascinating stuff. And over on Rikki's channel,

  • we did a collab with her as well, so please check

  • that one out too. The link is right on the screen

  • or in the description. Also, I'd like to thank

  • our interpreter, Andrea, for helping us out.

  • You have a YouTube channel as well. What's on that?

  • ANDREA: Yeah, so on my channel I talk about Spina Bifida which is a birth defect

  • that I have and I talk about disability rights and

  • intersectional feminism. So you can probably find

  • that in the description if Tommy likes me well enough to put it there.

  • But it's there. So do your best. Have fun.

  • That's it. That's all I got.

  • [music plays]

  • RIKKI: And in case you're wondering because I do get this a lot

  • in the comments - "But she's understanding everything Tommy's

  • says." We have this outline here that

  • Ben has written up before I got over here and this

  • is a very important piece of material

  • I know what's going on even if I don't understand what he's saying

  • I can get an idea and then we just keep it going, keep it going.

  • TOMMY: I guess your saying print works too.

  • RIKKI: Yeah, pretty much.

  • BEN: [laughs] I love it. That's such a throw away.

  • [beep] TOMMY: I also want to thank Abby who's been with us all day

  • just making us laugh and keeping us smiling for the whole video. Thanks, Abby!

  • ABBY: You're welcome. TOMMY: A little louder. I don't think Rikki heard you.

  • ABBY: You're welcome! TOMMY: [laughs]

TOMMY: In this video, we're going to give you two disabilities for the price of the one.

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A2 初級 美國腔

盲人和聾人如何溝通?(Rikki Poynter) (How Do A Blind Person & A Deaf Person Communicate? (with Rikki Poynter))

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    無常之風 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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