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  • That style of music.

  • That energy.

  • It’s about feeling

  • like youre flying.

  • People go out to dance, they want to have a good time.

  • Symbolized by...

  • Fist in the air, just pumping.

  • It’s music for me. It’s my life.

  • I practice it. I sleep it. It means everything to me.

  • I consider this the music of today.

  • The new dance style, it is a big part, no question.

  • It just stems from, I guess, the first feeling.

  • People have to respect what dance music is about.

  • Doesn’t matter if you make rap, if you make hip-hop,

  • if you make house music,

  • we all share the same passion.

  • To your left please.

  • Something

  • I’ve been working on during the holidays.

  • So I’m really excited I can play tonight for the first time.

  • It’s a really exciting night,

  • cos I love Glasgow.

  • I don’t know why,

  • I always had kind of a special relationship with people here.

  • This tour is really important to me,

  • because it’s my first serious UK tour.

  • Of course I’ve played many, many times in the UK,

  • but this time it’s like, every day in a concert hall,

  • only me headlining,

  • so it’s important.

  • Do you have a name for this track?

  • No, it’s not the final name. Right now it’s called Midas Touch.

  • Very often,

  • we kind of pick random names at the beginning

  • and turn it into something.

  • Like I have a sort of track called like,

  • Budapest,

  • London,

  • like the place where I am, where I make the track.

  • You alright?

  • Are you ready? That’s the question.

  • I’m always ready.

  • Part of the history of house music,

  • there was this moment when they were burning the disco records

  • in stadiums.

  • And it was the end of disco,

  • but it was also a very racist act.

  • They were, in a way, burning black music.

  • And then, a few guys started

  • to sample old disco records,

  • especially B-sides,

  • and create their own disco records, because there was no more productions.

  • It was just poor black kids

  • with no money

  • who discovered all these electronic machines,

  • and they would make this weird, strange music.

  • Strange, dark,

  • sparse, minimal stuff.

  • So the DJs that wanted to keep on making this music

  • would program drum machines

  • and add little pieces of records

  • that they would loop.

  • And this is how, actually, house music was born,

  • by recycling disco into something new.

  • There’s something really special here.

  • When the party’s good,

  • the cheer, and it go like,

  • here we, here we,

  • here we f***ing go!’

  • And at the beginning of that,

  • the whole room was singing this, and I was like, what?

  • Especially with the accent.

  • And then I understood,

  • so let’s see if tonight they go

  • here we f***ing go.’

  • That’s a good sign when they do this.

  • What David Guetta symbolises is like,

  • translation.

  • To people that might not know house culture, or dance music culture,

  • David Guetta translates it to those other people.

  • What he’s done is bring awareness

  • to dance music in a big way.

  • I’m not really sure exactly

  • what motivates David,

  • but I would say his passion

  • for the music,

  • his love of the music and the power that music has to transform your life,

  • and your energy, and your spirit.

  • I mean you can put a song on a radio,

  • and you come to a club and you may be down,

  • and you get immersed in this music,

  • in the beat, and your life is changed.

  • And this beat that I just finished today,

  • youre the first people on the planet to hear it.

  • And I promise you something.

  • When I’m going to put out this record,

  • the name of the record

  • will be

  • Glasgow!

  • Dance music in America,

  • is kind of came with the rave sound in the early nineties.

  • But that kind of came in

  • with a witch hunt,

  • so it got squashed.

  • So it never really took off, electronic music.

  • And then what happened was

  • all the guys that were making electronic music,

  • like house music from Chicago, house music from New York,

  • techno from Detroit,

  • everybody kind of picked up and went to where we were appreciated.

  • It was England where it really first took grip,

  • and you had that kind of whole idea of

  • rave culture, club culture, and people living for the weekend,

  • and that whole scenario,

  • and tribes, and clubs, and following the DJ. That really kicked off in England.

  • That was fun.

  • And I love that new beat, it’s cool, huh?

  • The last beat I played, like the new beat?

  • I have to call it Glasgow now.

  • I said it.

  • Now it’s got to be called Glasgow.

  • In the early days

  • it was very, very different to how it is now,

  • in some respects. In many respects it’s exactly the same.

  • It still is going from A to B,

  • sleeping in a hotel,

  • getting up,

  • traveling to somewhere else the next day.

  • But what was different then

  • is we did gigs for no money.

  • It was about the quality of the show.

  • Who did David want to alight himself with?

  • Which DJs did he want to perform

  • alongside?

  • But at this time he was bottom of the bill.

  • We have got David Guetta coming in the studio

  • Can you please

  • call Akon and see if he could do those vocals?

  • Everything

  • sounds just crazy. Everything sounds the same.

  • It’s just unbelievable.

  • Please welcome to the show multi-Grammy award winning,

  • world’s best DJ, world’s best producer, David Guetta!

  • How are you finding time to be here? Cos youre like the busiest man in the world!

  • Yeah, but I’m happy to be here.

  • - Youve got a smile on your face, - Of course!

  • I’ve looked at the iTunes charts, it’s put me in such a good mood.

  • Number one on Sunday?

  • Number one everywhere in the world.

  • Almost, there’s a few country where I’m only number two.

  • All my life I wanted

  • this music to be as respected as hip-hop,

  • and rock and pop.

  • But it wasn’t.

  • We were like, the remixes, you know? It was like, not even the music itself.

  • For so many years, weve been a *** child of the business.

  • And finally now everybody wants a dance record.

  • It’s not only on the internet, you can hear it everywhere,

  • and get commercials and ads,

  • and it’s unbelievable how it’s kind of crossed from being one thing into this,

  • big pop monster.

  • Tonight, I’m playing the Brixton Academy.

  • It’s a big deal.

  • It makes me very nervous, it makes my heart beat.

  • Which doesn’t happen so much time, with experience you get confident.

  • But every time there is something really new

  • then I feel like I’m 17 again

  • and it’s my first gig in a club.

  • And that’s how I feel tonight.

  • I discovered house

  • because I was working in a gay club.

  • Not that I was gay, but the only job I found

  • was in that club, and I so wanted to be a DJ,

  • I was obsessed.

  • And it was like, it was like a drug.

  • I was working in a gay club, so I started to study

  • what was going on in the gay clubs in the US

  • and in the UK.

  • It was like, 87,

  • I heard what was going on in Chicago,

  • in the black gay clubs,

  • and in New York.

  • I discovered, followed Jackmaster Funk, these kind of records,

  • and they totally blew my mind,

  • I spoke to the owner of the club,

  • I told him,

  • "this music is crazy, this is going to change the world."

  • It’s acid house.

  • Best f***ing

  • World class DJ. World class beats.

  • I need to understand if Chris Willis

  • is supposed to play during my set,

  • or if he has his own set and he wants me to stay on stage?

  • There he is.

  • Do you know what’s happening?

  • I think I’m playing during your set.

  • In 2001, I met

  • a guy called Chris Willis

  • and it changed my life. He was a gospel singer.

  • He had nothing to do with dance music,

  • he knew nothing about this world.

  • And I was explaining to him

  • what house music was about,

  • And he was like, ‘yeah, but you know, I’m a gospel singer,

  • I might go to hell for this!

  • I’m like,

  • man, just see this as a church.

  • Youre just preaching to different kind of people.’

  • The record for me that changed things

  • was probably Love Don’t Let Me Go.

  • This was very much an eighties-esque kind of inspiration,

  • and actually a hybrid version was created later

  • that featured a group called The Egg.

  • And that was a breakthrough in the UK market

  • and that really pushed things open.

  • UK was the reference, you know?

  • When it comes to this kind of music.

  • So for me to have a successful record there,

  • that was definitely the beginning.

  • What many people don’t know

  • is that David is not just some fly by night DJ

  • that just arrived on the scene out of nowhere.

  • Not at all.

  • David and Cathy had both been dedicated to the scene

  • for many, many years.

  • David and I,

  • our passion is people,

  • music,

  • and nightlife.

  • David one day ask me,

  • Cathy, you need to start our own club now.

  • You need to find a location

  • to do some parties,

  • and I was afraid.

  • And he take my hand and he saywe try to do,

  • and we see after, you know?’

  • But it was hard work.

  • And he was really running a couple of amazing parties in Paris

  • that everyone wanted to play,

  • and he was also very ahead

  • in inviting guest DJs and stuff like that,

  • which was really new to everyone at the time. at the time.

  • People like DJ Pierre

  • and Little Louie Vega,

  • David Morales, Frankie Knuckles,

  • all those guys.

  • It was like a gift

  • to my clientele,

  • so they understand what this music was about.

  • And it was a gift to myself,

  • because for me it was an opportunity to understand how they were doing it.

  • I didn’t even know what making music was

  • until I heard house music.

  • And that sort of, totally, took me to, like, a different level.

  • Just love the feeling

  • of just forgetting everything, being on the dancefloor

  • with hands up in the air.

  • The feeling of being able to take on the whole world.

  • This record is really special for me.

  • It was the first single of my previous album, O