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  • Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. In the next few minutes you're going to master

  • one of the most important verbs in the English language, and that's the verb "to have".

  • Now, not only is it one of the most important verbs because we use it so often for so many different things,

  • it's also, unfortunately, a verb where a lot of students make mistakes, especially at a

  • basic level. And sometimes these basic mistakes can cause problems even down the road when

  • you reach advanced levels. So, whether you're a beginner student, or intermediate, or advanced

  • - please watch and just make sure you know it; and if you're reviewing it, make sure

  • that you review it really, really well. Okay? So, here we go.

  • So, with the verb "to have", one of the reasons it's so important is because we use it not

  • only as a basic verb by itself, but we also use it as a helping verb. All right? When

  • we use it as a basic verb by itself, we can use it to show possession; what somebody has,

  • what somebody owns. For example, you could talk about an object that you have, a thing

  • that you have. You could say: "I have a car." You could talk about somebody's features,

  • or qualities, or characteristics. For example: "She has nice hair." Or you could talk about

  • relationships that people have, for example: "They have children." Okay? You can also use

  • the verb "to have" to talk about actions, and we use this a lot. Like:

  • "I... I have a shower every day. I have dinner at 7 o'clock." Or: "He has a lot of meetings today." Right?

  • So, we use it in so many different ways. And, of course, as I said, we also use it in more

  • advanced ways as a helping verb in our perfect tenses. For example: "I have done my homework."

  • Okay?

  • So, let's begin understanding exactly how this simple verb is structured. All right.

  • So, I've divided the board into three sections: positive, negative, and questions. So, you'll

  • learn exactly how to use it in all three situations, and those are the only situations. Okay? So,

  • first: "I have", "You have", "We have", and "They have".

  • With these four pronouns, we say: "have",

  • and that's our base form of the verb, and that's what we use here.

  • But where does it change, and where do most of the mistakes happen? They happen, here.

  • For: "he", "she", and "it", we don't say "have". We have to say: "has". "He has a car.",

  • "She has a car.", "It has a camera." Okay? Your cellphone, for example. All right? So, make

  • sure that you remember this, because this part is very important. You will see that

  • actually we don't have "has" in any other section of this entire structure, but we do

  • have it here. Okay? I'll come back to it.

  • Now, what happens when we make the sentence negative? So, instead of saying:

  • "I have a camera", you can say: "I don't have a camera."

  • What is "don't"? "Don't" is short for "do not",

  • but when we're speaking, we just shorten it, we contract it, and it becomes "don't".

  • "I don't have a camera, you don't have a camera, we don't have a camera, and they don't have a camera,

  • so we're not going to take any pictures." Okay? All right. "Don't have".

  • Now, what happens when we're saying: "he", "she", or "it"? Now, two things happen. First

  • of all, we have to use a different word, here. We don't say: "do not", we say:

  • "does not".

  • When we shorten it, it becomes: "He doesn't". And then you come back to the base form of

  • the verb, so you say: "He doesn't have". Not: "He doesn't has", which is a mistake that

  • many students make, but you're coming back to the base form of the verb. Look at all

  • the places where we see the base form of the verb. Okay?

  • Here, here, here, here, here.

  • So, where do we not have the base form of the verb? Only with: "he", "she", and "it"

  • in the positive sentence. Okay? So, let's come back: "He doesn't have a car.",

  • "She doesn't have a car.", and "It doesn't have a camera." Okay? That's the negative.

  • Now, if you want to ask a question, then, again, we're going to use the words: "do"

  • and "does". So, here: "Do I have...?", "Do you have...?", "Do we have...?",

  • "Do they have...?" All right? And with: "he", "she", and "it", you have to use the word "does".

  • "Does he have a camera?", "Does she have a cellphone?", "Does it have an air conditioner?"

  • Okay? The... The room. All right? So, what you also have to remember is when you ask

  • a question with a question word, like "who" or "what": "What do we have to do?" then you

  • put that here. "What do we have...?", "Who do we have coming for dinner?",

  • "When do we have to be there?" So whatever the question word is, you can put that at the start of

  • the question, but you still keep this same structure. So whatever you've learned here

  • is true, even if you have a question word before. All right? "When do we have...?",

  • "Where do we have...?", "Who do we have...?", "How much do we have...?" All right?

  • So, you're still going to use the same structure. And the same thing here, except we're using "does":

  • "Does he have time?", "Does she have time?" Right? So... And: "Does it have...?" All right?

  • So, this is your basic structure. It's a good idea if you can sort of, you know, write this

  • down. Don't just look at it. Try to write it down yourself, get an idea of what's going

  • where, so then your brain has something to kind of connect to, it has a structure to

  • put this... All this information into. And then, of course, you have to do a lot of practice,

  • practical practice.

  • Okay, so let's do that. For example, now:

  • "Your brother __________ a cool car."

  • First we'll make it positive, then we'll make it negative, and then we'll make it into a

  • question. Because the way that you will know that you really understand this verb and can

  • use it properly is if you can make a positive sentence, a negative sentence, and then make

  • it into a question. So, let's do that here. "Your brother has a cool car." Make it negative:

  • "Your brother"... Now, your brother is what? It's "he", right? So: "Your brother

  • doesn't have a cool car." Or: "Does your brother have a cool car?" Okay?

  • Now, we're just making this for the sake of the examples, all right?

  • Next: "Mary __________ a new job."

  • Now, what do we say? "have" or "has"? Now, what's Mary? Mary is like "she", so: "Mary..."

  • We can put that, here. Okay? Well, actually, you know what? I'm not going to put it here

  • for now, because later when we change it, then it won't make sense. All right? But you

  • keep it in your mind and you say it aloud with me. All right? So:

  • "Mary has a new job."

  • Correct? Make it negative:

  • "Mary doesn't have a new job." Make it a question:

  • "Does Mary have a new job?"

  • Good. Okay?

  • Next: "The cat __________ a black tail."

  • Now, what's the cat? Which of these pronouns describes the cat? It would be "it". So:

  • "The cat has a black tail." Make it negative: "The cat doesn't have a black tail." Make it a

  • question: "Does the cat have a black tail?" Okay? Are you getting it? There's a kind of

  • rhythm to it, and if you start to say all three, you'll get into the rhythm of it. Because

  • learning to use a language is not just, of course, about learning the grammar. Finally,

  • it's about remembering it, it's about your mouth remembering what to say, it's about

  • your brain knowing what to say, and your ears hearing that: "Yes, that's right" or

  • "No, that doesn't sound right." Okay? So there's a lot of things going on when you're using

  • a new language.

  • Let's continue. Number four: "The children __________ their own rooms."

  • Now, what's the children? Which pronoun is that?

  • "They", okay? "The children

  • have their own rooms." Good. Make it negative:

  • "The children don't have their own rooms." Make it a question:

  • "Do the children have their own rooms?" Good. Very nice.

  • Number five: "Mom and I __________ dinner at 7:00."

  • Now, what's "mom and I"? That's like "we", good. "Mom and I have dinner at 7:00.",

  • "Mom and I don't have dinner at 7:00." Make it a question:

  • "Do mom and I have dinner at 7:00?"

  • I don't remember. Sometimes.

  • Okay, number six: "My laptop __________ a big screen."

  • What's my laptop, which one is that? That's like "it". Right? So:

  • "My laptop has a big screen."

  • Okay. Make it negative: "My laptop doesn't have a big screen." Very good.

  • We're coming back to the base form of the verb, and make it a question: "Does your laptop",

  • shall we say. "Does your laptop have a big screen?" Okay? Very nice. Okay?

  • So, you did these examples and that's great. Of course, you need to do lots of examples

  • so that it comes easily and correctly to you, without too much stress. Okay? You want it

  • to be enjoyable. When you enjoy the language, then it's more fun, and you keep learning

  • and you keep practicing and you feel good. All right? So, to practice some more,

  • go to our website at www.engvid.com. That's one thing you can do. There, you can do a quiz on this.

  • And besides that, come up with some of your own examples. This verb "have" is so common,

  • it's really easy to come up with sentences of your own. So, wherever you are right now,

  • look around, and just say some sentences. You could say, for example: "I have a desk.

  • I have a carpet. I have some paintings on the wall." Okay? And then take those sentences

  • and make them negative, take those sentences and make them questions. Use different pronouns.

  • Say: "I have a desk. He has a desk." Okay? That's a really good exercise to do, too.

  • "I have a desk. He has a desk. I have a carpet. She has a carpet." Okay? Because that's the

  • basic change that you need to make, here. And the same way if it's a negative sentence

  • or if it's a question. All right?

  • You've done a really good job. I know there's a lot going on-okay?-when you're using these

  • sentences. You are connecting the words with the pronouns, and the verb, and the negative,

  • and the positive. But take it one step at a time, take it systematically.

  • If you get confused doing everything, don't do everything. Just do one thing, just do the positive. First,

  • just stay here, get those all right. Okay? You don't have to try to do everything and

  • get confused. Just do a little bit really well. When you feel good and confident about

  • that, do the next part, and go forward one step at a time.

  • In order to do that, you could also subscribe to my YouTube channel where I have lots of videos

  • which I believe could help you along your way. Okay?

  • Thanks very much for watching, and all the best with your English.

  • Bye for now.

Hi. I'm Rebecca from engVid. In the next few minutes you're going to master

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A2 初級

學習英語語法:現在時的 "to have"。 (Learn English Grammar: "to have" in the present tense)

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    jwlee 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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