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  • So it is three thirty PM in Madrid, which means it is lunch time.

  • So we're outside at a little patio right across from our hotel.

  • And we're going to be doing a battle of the soups.

  • We plan on trying two different soups that are from the region ofrdoba, Andalusia

  • in southern Spain.

  • And they are called Gazpacho and Salmorejo.

  • And there is some similarities and some differences between these two cold soups, so we're going

  • to be showing you what those are.

  • So our two soups have arrived.

  • I'm having Gazpacho, Sam is having Salmorejo.

  • And at first glance they do look quite similar.

  • The same color because it is a tomato base but the topping is a little bit different.

  • Now we're going to be actually tasting them and telling you about the ingedients and what

  • sets these two apart.

  • Okay, so time for the first spoonful of Gazpacho.

  • Oh ho ho, baby!

  • Mmmm.

  • That is so good.

  • It is tangy because of the tomato.

  • It is served cold so it is really refreshing.

  • And this one has a lot more ingredients than Salmorejo.

  • So I just put in some chopped bell peppers, green and red peppers.

  • It has also got a bit of onions in there.

  • And it was drizzled with olive oil on top.

  • So a great combination on a hot summer day.

  • I'm just going to keep enjoying this over here.

  • It is so good.

  • So two more things I'll mention about Gazpacho.

  • If you don't want like a full bowl of soup you can actually get it as a drink in a glass

  • and that is cheaper because it is a smaller portion.

  • And also Spanish Gazpacho is really different from Moroccan Gazpacho, which is what I was

  • used to.

  • The Moroccan recipe has chickpeas and beans so don't be surprised if you come to Spain

  • and there are no chickpeas in your Gazpacho.

  • And Gazpacho also comes with a basket of bread on the side.

  • So if you don't want to drink it like a soup you can just dip some bread in there.

  • And almost treat it like a dip.

  • Great either way.

  • And you are having Salmorejo.

  • Tell us what that is like?

  • And that is a little bit different than the Gazpacho.

  • If you look down here you can see that it is a thicker tomato puree.

  • So basically it is thicker.

  • And you'll also notice that there is some egg here.

  • So I'm going to have the first bite to see what it tastes like.

  • You have some egg, ham and olive oil as your toppings.

  • Yeah, it is almost a bit more like a cold stew than a soup.

  • It is definitely thicker.

  • I really like the taste.

  • I like the olive oil drizzled on top too.

  • It just.

  • It is a really awesome dish to have in the summer to cool down.

  • And apparently there is a mystery ingredient here.

  • What is it?

  • Yeah, there is something cool that we discovered upon research.

  • And that is that stale bread is in both of these.

  • In both of these soups.

  • So they soak it in water and then just mix it in with the Gazpacho and the Salmorejo.

  • But you wouldn't be able to tell at first glance.

  • No, you wouldn't.

  • And price point for this meal.

  • So as an appetizer here in Madrid you can pick one up for about five Euros.

  • Or if you want the smaller portion you can get it in a glass for about two to three Euros.

  • Two fifty usually.

  • So it is dinner time in Madrid and today we are here at a local restaurant where we're

  • going to be trying two different dishes.

  • We are planning to eat Paella and something called Fideuà.

  • They are two dishes from the region of Valencia.

  • And there are some similarities and some differences between the two so we'll be showing you those

  • as soon as the plates arrive.

  • The food has arrived.

  • Yes, some I'm going introduce mine first.

  • I am having the Fideua, which is kind of like a noodle Paella, and it is made with Vermicelli

  • noodles which are super thin and mine has mussels, prawns and squid as well as artichoke

  • hearts so let's take a big bite of this.

  • It's hot.

  • That is really nice.

  • Wow.

  • You can really taste the seafood.

  • It is super flavorful.

  • And I also like that the noodles are a little bit overcooked.

  • Like they are nice and soggy, which is how I like them.

  • So I'm quite happy with my meal so far.

  • Okay, so your mixed Paella has arrived.

  • Tell us about it.

  • Yeah, the Paella is finally here.

  • So the mixed Paella has a whole bunch of different things.

  • Let's take a look down at it.

  • So you can see that there is chicken, we've got shrimp, we've got other kinds of seafood,

  • we've got peas and it has got kind of a looks like to be a yellow type of curry sauce.

  • Nice.

  • So let's take the first bite here.

  • This is my favorite Spanish food.

  • The thing I like about it so much is that you have all of these different ingredients

  • and it just has such a flavorful sauce on top of the rice.

  • It is just so good.

  • So if Sam were to try the traditional Paella from Valencia that one would actually have

  • chicken and rabbit because that is what the original recipe calls for.

  • But we're not really used to eating rabbit so that is why we went with the mixed one

  • that has chicken, some seafood and chorizo.

  • So quite a few restaurants in Madrid, and all throughout Spain have Paella on the menu,

  • but the ones that really specialize in it have a special kind of pan.

  • Some come take a look here.

  • And you can see that it is made right in it and brought to your table.

  • And they have the wooden guards on the end that basically probably protect you from getting

  • burnt.

  • Exactly.

  • Well, we certainly polished that off.

  • So now let's talk about the price.

  • Yeah, that was nice and filling.

  • So in terms of price it can vary widely.

  • In more expensive kind of like gourmet restaurants that really specialize in it we've seen it

  • go up to thirty or thirty five Euros.

  • We've never actually ate somewhere like that.

  • The place we went to was eleven Euros.

  • And we thought it was a really good value.

  • We're both really full now.

  • And I've also seen it as an appetizer in some smaller types of restaurants and you can expect

  • maybe to pay seven or eight Euros for that.

  • So it is breakfast time here in Madrid.

  • We've just rolled out of bed at 10 am.

  • Which is a bit unusual.

  • But we're here at a local cafe and we're going to have a traditional Spanish breakfast.

  • So we have ordered a hot chocolate with Churros and Porras.

  • So we're going to show you what those are like in just a few minutes.

  • So this is something that is completely new for me.

  • This is called Porras.

  • And it is basically like a giant sized Churro.

  • Like I've never seen anything like this before.

  • I know, look at that, it's like.

  • It's wider than your shoulders.

  • Hahaha!

  • Alright, so we're going to dip it in the hot chocolate because that is how things are done

  • here.

  • Oh ho ho baby.

  • Mmmmm.

  • That is delicious.

  • It is nice and greasy.

  • And sweet.

  • It is probably not the healthiest way to start the day but 'hey' when in Spain.

  • Hey we're doing it the Spanish way.

  • That is delicious.

  • I'm loving it.

  • What are you having?

  • I'm actually having the proper Churros.

  • This is a deep-fried dough.

  • And what I've found interesting is that when I've had this in Canada it is more of a dessert

  • but over here in Spain it is a breakfast.

  • And it is very popular breakfast item.

  • So let's dip that right in the chocolate.

  • Show us how it is done.

  • Break off a piece here.

  • And that hot chocolate is as thick as it gets.

  • It must have some kind of special ingredients that make it especially thick and rich.

  • It's like mud.

  • It's like chocolate sludge.

  • Wow!

  • Let me just say I could get very used to having this as my normal breakfast.

  • It's that good.

  • So what I find unique about the Spanish Churros is the shape.

  • When we had these in South America they were usually like long little strips.

  • And also there is no filing in these.

  • I still haven't come across any Spanish Churros that have fillings.

  • Whereas in South America they were stuffed with chocolate, vanilla pudding, dulce de

  • leche.

  • So that is another difference.

  • Now let's dip this.