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  • Hello! I'm Emma from mmmEnglish and in

  • this lesson, I found an American all the

  • way down here in Australia and I thought

  • that I'd use him to show you some of

  • the pronunciation differences between

  • Australian English and American English.

  • You don't mind if I use you, Allan?

  • Use away!

  • How long have you been in Australia Allan?

  • Two weeks now.

  • Two weeks! And what do you think of it so far?

  • It's beautiful. Yeah. Actually this is our

  • first rainy day but for most days it's been

  • really, really nice out here in the west side.

  • Rainy days are good for filming actually!

  • Oh! That's good, perfect day.

  • Hey, what's one weird thing that

  • Australians say? Australians say a lot of

  • weird things with slang words. What kinds

  • of things have you heard that have kind

  • of just weirded you out?

  • Maybe if someone said, you know, "Go to the

  • boot and get some bush chooks and

  • we'll crack a tinnie." And you're like, "I have no

  • idea what you're talking about!"

  • Nobody knows what you're talking about!

  • What he actually said was can you go to the car,

  • the back of the car, open it, get out a

  • can of beer and open the beer. Drink it.

  • And drink the beer. So we can drink beer.

  • Boot is actually not that weird, that's just

  • you know, you have a different name in America, right?

  • We just call it a trunk.

  • A trunk. The back of the car in America is called a

  • trunk but here in Australia and in

  • the UK too it's boot. Yes. You also say some

  • really weird things actually, this

  • morning you said to me "I'm going to go

  • and pet that horse out there." and I

  • was like "what?" because pet is just like an animal in

  • Australia, like a dog or a cat. Right, right.

  • But you're using it as a verb like you

  • would - like we say pat, pat the

  • animal and you say pet. Yeah, yeah pet.

  • Yeah. Pet the animal.

  • But my point is that even native English

  • speakers have, you know, sometimes we have

  • words or even pronunciation that we

  • don't quite understand about each other

  • and you have to sort of piece the puzzle

  • together and that's definitely what

  • we've been doing the last few days, right?

  • Since I met you. Definitely. Piecing it

  • together. Yeah right, piecing it together.

  • Figuring it out. I'm going to, I've got

  • some words actually written down here

  • that I want to, I want to test your

  • pronunciation on because I think that

  • the way that you say these words is

  • quite different to the way that we say

  • them here in Australia. So I want to test

  • that out and I want to demonstrate to

  • you guys what that actually, what it

  • looks like or what it sounds like. The

  • different - the difference between the

  • American accent and the Australian

  • accent. So the first one is this one, Allan.

  • How do you say this? That's hot.

  • Hot. Hot. OK, so we would say hot. So

  • more like oh rather than ah. Yeah so it's a

  • little bit different - that's an easy one

  • to start with. What about this one?

  • Going to be very different. We say car. This one,

  • Car. Car. Car. So the main difference there

  • is that Allan pronounces the 'r' at the

  • end of this word. You say car. We use

  • the 'r', yes. And we just dropped that 'r'

  • sound, it's kind of silent. It's just ah. Car.

  • Yeah! That's like, that's proper Australian

  • accent. Car. All right, what about

  • this one? Bottle. Bottle. Bottle. Now the

  • way that I say bottle is - with T's. Yeah

  • but it's not, actually, lots of

  • Australians have the same pronunciation

  • of these two T's like, like you do and

  • often I say bottle as well. So you

  • instead of pronouncing that T, it's like

  • a 'd' sound, like a lazy D sound. Bottle.

  • Bottle. Yeah. Bottle. Bottle. Yeah that's

  • pretty good, it's pretty close. But that's one

  • similarity between the Australian accent

  • and the American accent - is this double T or

  • even just a single T in the middle of

  • words like a bottle of water. A bottle of

  • water. Yeah, like someone from the UK

  • would say a bottle of water - in a better

  • accent than me.

  • OK, how about this one? Burger.

  • I think the way he says this is hilarious!

  • We say burger but you pronounce this 'u'

  • in a different way. Burger. Yes. Bur- Burger.

  • Burger. And I just say burger. OK!

  • Sometimes we'd drop the 'a' there, we'll say

  • garage. Garage? Oh, like that's

  • really, really soft. Yeah, sometimes it's

  • garage or sometimes it's just garage. So

  • the main difference between the American

  • and the Australian or the UK British

  • accent pronunciation of this word is

  • that we would put the stress on the

  • first syllable

  • and we would say ga-rage, garage.

  • And you would say garage so the stress

  • pattern is different for this word.

  • Garage. Garage.

  • OK. Bought. That is not

  • how you say that! Bought. Yes. Bought. It's pretty

  • similar! Bought. Bought. Yeah it's pretty similar.

  • Bought. What about this one, then? Daughter.

  • Daughter. Daughter.

  • Daughter or daughter. That's another good

  • example of that 't'. Daughter.

  • How about this one?

  • Aunt. Or aunt. But it's mostly, I think you

  • hear people say aunt more. Aunt.

  • We say aunt. Aunt. My auntie. Do you say auntie?

  • No, we just say aunt. We don't really use

  • auntie as much. OK so that's quite

  • different! Aunt and aunt. How about this one?

  • Entreprenuer. OK so the main difference

  • there is in this last couple of

  • syllables. We say entrepreneur. Oh really?

  • Entrepreneur. Yeah. Now I don't even know

  • how to say it! Entrepreneur. So you

  • kind of do two syllables at

  • the end here, where we just go entrepreneur or

  • entrepreneur. Entrepreneur.

  • Entrepreneur. That's a weird word. Entrepreneur. What

  • about.. this is kind of related, this word.

  • Yeah. There's niche or niche. What do you say?

  • I say niche but maybe I've been saying

  • it wrong for a while but I think people say

  • niche though. It's your niche. Everyone, lots of

  • people in America say niche but everyone

  • outside of America says niche.

  • Is that true? Did you have to look that up? No that's true!

  • I want to make sure I'm not the only one here.

  • It's not just you! Lots of Americans say

  • niche and add a 't' sound in there

  • but the rest of the world, the rest of

  • the English-speaking world, says niche.

  • Find your niche. Interesting, very interesting. OK.

  • Caramel. Sorry what?

  • Caramel. We'll say caramel, caramel apple!

  • Caramel, caramel apple! Yeah.

  • Caramel. Yes it's very different. Caramel. And I

  • don't know why it's caramel, but it's

  • caramel or people will say it both ways.

  • It's caramel or caramel. Yeah and even then,

  • - caramel - if you say caramel, you put

  • like a stronger stress on this third

  • syllable, don't you? Caramel. Yeah -mel.

  • Caramel. OK this one.

  • Mobile.

  • Mobile. Mobile. Mobile.

  • Very different. It's quite different. But this is like -

  • - you say it correctly. You would normally, you

  • would normally say just cell phone, right?

  • Yeah, we say cell phone. When

  • do you use this word? Like a mobile home, like