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  • Mike Basich was a snowboarding pioneer. But after hundreds of competitions that brought

  • money and fame, he went in search of something different.

  • [ROCK MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Welcome.

  • Thank you. It's such a rush just to get up here.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • When did you first get into snowboarding?

  • My mom was always looking for something different and fun for us to try out, so that's how we

  • discovered it. And the sport had no rules. And that's where-- that kept us in it, because

  • no one was telling us what to do.

  • Oh! Ouch!

  • From 7 to about 14 years old, I had epilepsy. And so being different than everyone else,

  • you felt at home. That's something my parents drove into me every day, saying it's OK to

  • be different. I just tackle things that way.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Well, welcome.

  • Wow.

  • This is the inside.

  • It's beautiful. How long did it take for you to build this place?

  • It took me five years-- two and a half years to do all the rock work. I think I moved about

  • 175 ton of rock. Every piece of cement was hand mixed, and gathered the water for it

  • by hand, as well.

  • God, it's such a labor of love.

  • You get to do fun things. This is actually a shower here. And it's a seat in the daytime.

  • But you get to use-- it's a bit camping style. No shower curtain, just out in the open. Pouring

  • water, sitting down.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • I've got a little oven, which the door's from the junkyard. And bought a nice little fireplace,

  • which is my cooking, heating water, warming the place. So that's the central attention

  • for the utilities.

  • Yeah. This is it.

  • Where are you getting your water?

  • Yeah, this is creek water, which I have two creeks on the property.

  • Mike, where do you sleep?

  • I've got the loft as my bedroom-- very different than anywhere else I've lived. I go to bed

  • with the sun, and I wake up with it. I don't feel like I'm trying to race time. In a city,

  • you always feel like you're on a rat race. And here, it feels like you're in sync with

  • what's actually happening.

  • So this was your dream. Since you were a little boy, you've been wanting to do this.

  • This is my dream and reality, 40 acres to do whatever I want with. It's really fun.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Tell me when you first started getting into that competitive circuit.

  • Competitive circuit was right off the start. The World Cup, traveled the world a bunch--

  • I'd be in a different country almost every weekend. Worked my body hard.

  • I was making about $170,000 a year. Played it pretty smart. I bought my first house,

  • 4,000 square-foot house-- huge-- because I went for the American dream. I bought the

  • big house and had a fancy car. It didn't do anything different for me. It just took up

  • time.

  • We started getting sponsors that didn't have anything to do with snowboarding. You started

  • dealing with people that didn't really care about your imagination. I let go of the competition

  • 15 years ago, at least. I do a lot through photography through snowboarding, so that's

  • been my outlet versus the competition. And that's how I end up in the back country.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Where did the decision come from to build this place off the grid?

  • Nature inspires me, and that's why I choose this kind of environment. I want to learn

  • how to live off the grid, have appreciation for nature, and how to keep the rain off my

  • head, stay warm.

  • Wow. This is breathtaking.

  • This glass is definitely a heating tool for me. It faces south, so it's a great space

  • to have that much glass.

  • Not a bad view.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • Not a bad way to wake up.

  • This is the great outdoors.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • I got a chairlift over here that's super fun to ride.

  • You built that?

  • Yeah, it took me about eight months with some friends. You get to ride all this terrain

  • here, which is super fun.

  • This is your giant playground right here.

  • Yeah, this is my own private resort. There's a water source on this pillar, water falls

  • into the hot tub.

  • So you don't have a toilet in your house, but you have a hot tub.

  • Yep.

  • [LAUGHTER]

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • How did you come up with the design for the home?

  • The design's built on the golden ratio. Building under that law of nature is supposed to make

  • the space feel more fit to the body. This one is a pentagon, which if you connect all

  • those dots, you get a star.

  • And that's what the star you saw on the window represents. It casts a shadow on the floor,

  • which is another smaller pentagon. And they all meet at 3:02 on my birthday. That was

  • how it all came down to a personal building for me.

  • I've ended up here off the road, off the beaten trail, and loving it. I like to think of it

  • as getting back to the basics of humanity. I like feeling connected to the Earth more

  • than I could with a 4,000 square-foot house. So it gave me the strength of doing everything

  • myself, and the lessons, and a childhood dream that I wanted to fulfill. And that's what

  • this project of this house was about, was to fulfill a childhood dream.

  • In the next episode of "Going Off Grid," we meet a family that left everything behind.

  • We carry water for the shower, just like we carry everything, in a basin. And we heat

  • up water on the propane torch, mix that together with cold water until we have the temperature

  • right. And then that mix , we'll run through a hose downhill to the shower.

  • "Going Off Grid" is a part of "Seeker Stories." To see all the stories we post here, be sure

  • to subscribe. Thanks for watching.

Mike Basich was a snowboarding pioneer. But after hundreds of competitions that brought

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一個滑雪者的不可思議的小房子。 (A Snowboarder's Unbelievable Tiny House)

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    大菲鴨阿 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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