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  • Hello and welcome to 6 Minute English. I'm Alice

    哈囉,歡迎來到六分鐘英文。我是 Alice

  • And I'm Neil.

    我是 Neil

  • Could you lend me some dosh, Neil?

    Neil 你可以借我一些錢嗎?

  • Sure. How much do you need?

    當然。你需要多少?

  • A couple of smackers

    一些一塊錢

  • You're sounding strange today, Alice.

    你今天聽起來怪怪的,Alice

  • Yes, I know, Neil. Slangor informal language used by a particular groupis the subject of today's show,

    是啊,我知道,Neil。俚語-特定族群使用的非正式語言-這是今天節目的主題

  • and I was just demonstrating a couple of slang words that mean 'money'. Dosh is a general term for money and a smacker is a British pound or US dollar.

    我剛只是示範了一些代表「錢」的俚語用詞。Dosh 泛指金錢,而 smacker 則是英鎊或是美元

  • OK, so Cockney Rhyming Slang is a type of slang. It's a coded language invented in the 19th Century

    好的,考克尼同韻俚語也是一種俚語。這是一個由考尼克人在 19 世紀發明的密碼語言

  • by Cockneys so they could speak in front of the police without being understood. And still on the subject of money, I have a question for you, Alice.

    所以他們可以在警察面前講話不會被聽懂。Alice,關於錢這個主題,我還有問題想要問你

  • oh~ OK.

    好喔!

  • What's Cockney Rhyming Slang for 'money'? Is it… a) bread? b) honey? Or c) dough?

    什麼是關於「錢」的考尼克同韻俚語?是 a) 麵包 b)蜂蜜?還是 c)生麵團?

  • I think it's a) bread. I bet you didn't know, Neil, that I'm a Cockney.

    我覺得是 a) 麵包。我賭你不知道,Neil,我可是考尼克人呢!

  • I don't Adam and Eve it, Alice! That's a pork pie!

    我不相信 (Adam and Eve)!你騙人 (pork pie)!

  • 'Adam and Eve' means 'believe' and 'pork pie' means… 'lie'! Actually, you're right. I'm not a Cockney.

    「Adam and Eve」的意思是「相信」,然後「豬肉派」是指....「謊言」!事實上,你是對的。我不是考尼克人。

  • To be considered a Cockney, you need to be born within hearing distance of the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church in what is now the City of London.

    要被認為是一位考尼克人,你需要出生在可以聽到倫敦市聖瑪麗勒波教堂鐘聲的距離內

  • Indeed. Now, slang, as we've said, is colloquialor informallanguage. And it's characteristic of specific social groups

    的確,現在,俚語,就如同我們所說的,是口語的-或者是通俗的-語言。是某特殊族群的特徵

  • We usually use it in informal conversation rather than in writing or more formal situations, like a job interview.

    我們通常是在非正式的對話中使用這些俚語,而不是在寫作或更為正式的場合,像是工作面試之類的

  • We change the way we speak so that what we say is appropriate for a particular situation. So you surprised me earlier, Alice,

    我們會依據情況不同而使用適當的說話方式。所以早先的時候,Alice 你嚇到我了

  • by talking about 'dosh' and 'smackers' because it didn't seem appropriate for presenting the show.

    在討論「dosh」跟「smackers」時,因為他們似乎不太適合在節目上播出。

  • Slang use is often frowned uponor disapproved of. Let's listen to Jonathan Green, a lexicographer of slang, talking about who uses slang and how this has changed.

    俚語的使用通常是不被認真看待的-或是不被贊成的。讓我們來聽聽俚語辭典編纂者 Jonathan Green 談論是誰在使用俚語,以及俚語如何產生了變化

  • Here he is on the Radio 4 programme Word of Mouth.

    以下是他在 Radio 4 的廣播節目 Word of Mouth 的片段

  • Slang does have a bad reputation and I would say this comes from its earliest collection, which was of criminal slang in the 1500s in the 16th century,

    俚語確實有很糟的名聲,我會說是因為它早期的來源是十六世紀的罪犯用語

  • and it was associated with bad people, and inevitably that has lingered. But now in the last 40 or 50 years it's changed

    且跟壞人有些關連,且不可避免的,(壞名聲) 就被留下來了。但在最近的四、五十年間,情況有所改變。

  • The definitions tend to stress 'different' and 'jocular', 'funny', 'humorous', 'inventive', that kind of thing.

    這些定義往往強調「不同」、「詼諧」、「有趣」、「幽默」及「有創造力」等等。

  • So we have records of 16th Century slang in collectionsor dictionaries. Words used by criminals as a code so they could talk without being understood

    所以我們有16世紀的俚語收藏在記錄-或字典中。字詞的使用被罪犯們來說,是一種密碼,以讓他們所講的話不被他人聽懂。

  • And this bad reputation has lingeredor been slow to disappear.

    然後這壞名稱就留下了-或者是很慢才能消失。

  • Alice: But for the last 50 years we've been using slang to be funny and creative as well as to show belonging to a particular group.

    Alice:但是在過去的五十年,我們為了好笑,創意而使用俚語,或是用來表示自己屬於某一群人。

  • And apparently we're very creative when talking about drinking and being drunk. The slang word boozemeaning 'alcohol' – comes from the 13th Century Dutch word, 'būsen'.

    且很顯然地,當我們在談到有關喝酒跟醉酒時,我們會很有創造力。「booze」在俚語中,代表「中,代表「酒精」,源自於十三世紀的德文字「būsen'」

  • Neil: And there are hundreds of slang expressions to talk about drink and being drunk:

    Neil : 有好幾百個俚語的是用在談論有關喝酒跟醉酒的

  • 'on the sauce', 'in your cups', 'half cut', 'hammered', 'squiffy', 'tipsy', 'wasted', 'legless', and many many more that are far too rude to mention in this programme.

    「在醬料中」、「在你的杯子裡」、「切半」、「槌打的」、「爽快的」、「醉酒的」、「浪費的」、「無腿的」,還有很多在這邊提到的話就太粗魯的字。

  • Alice Yes. So, while these terms might not be strictly acceptableor appropriate in formal contexts, they aren't offensive

    Alice :是的。所以,這些名詞可能不太能夠完全被接受-或者不太適用於正式的場合中,,但是它們並不會令人不舒服

  • they are often amusing and help people bond in social groups.

    它們常常娛樂了大家,或是幫助人們與社群連結。

  • Neil: By contrast, swear words or profanitymeans 'rude language that offends or upsets people'.

    Neil :反之,髒話或是穢言-意味著「「冒犯人或使人不悅的粗魯語言」

  • And I'm not going to give any examples because that would be inappropriate and impolite, Alice

    我不會給任何的範例,因為這不太適合並且很無禮,Alice

  • Alice: OK, let's listen now to Jonathan Green and presenter Michael Rosen talking about jargonanother type of in-group language

    Alice:好了。讓我們現在來聽聽 Jonathan Green 以及主持人 Michael Rosen 談談有關行話-另外一種群體的語言。

  • Jargon is what I would call is small 'o' occupational, small 'p' professional. It's closed off environments.

    行話就是我稱之為小 O (職業) 跟小 P (專業)。它只出現在特定環境

  • You get legal jargon, you get naval jargon, I've been reading Patrick O'Brien recently and that's awash with futtock plates and fiddling the decks.

    你有法律的行話、你有海軍的行話,我最近一直在讀 Patrick O'Brien(英國作家及翻譯家,描寫拿破崙時代海戰和海軍生活的怒海爭鋒系列小說聞名。)的作品。這小說不斷提到了桅頂支索固定板和錯綜複雜的甲板

  • MR: This is radio 4 Jonathan, be careful!

    MR:Jonathan 這裡是 Radio 4,小心一點

  • Neil: Jonathan Green in another segment of the BBC Radio 4 programme Word of Mouth.

    Neil:Jonathan Green 在 Radio 4 頻道 Word of Mouth 節目的另一個片段

  • So he says jargon is occupational and professional, meaning people speak it at work, for example, lawyers and sailors.

    所以他來說行話是職業級的、專業的,意味著人們會在工作時說,例如:法律人跟海軍。

  • A futtock plate is, I believe, an iron plate attached to the top of a ship's mast. But I don't know much about this subject.

    我相信,桅頂支索固定板是一種鋼鐵的金屬板加裝在加裝在船桅的頂端。但我不太了解這個主題。

  • Alice: That's the idea, thoughjargon is the technical language belonging to a specific group. And to outsiders this jargon is often hard to understand.

    Alice:就是這個意思,想想-行話是一種技術性的語言,屬於特定族群。對外行人來說,行話常常是難以理解的。

  • Neil: Yes and here in the studio I can use all the radio jargon that I like. Look at my faders here, Alice. Going down and up and up and I'm just testing our levels

    Neil:是的 ,在這個播音室裡我可以大講廣播相關的行話。 看看我這邊的化音器,往下、往上、往上,我只是在測試我們的音量

  • Alice Come on, live the fader alone. It controls the level of sound on a studio deck. Now it's time for the answer to today's quiz question, Neil.

    Alice :好了,別再玩化音器了。 在播音室的控制台上,是用來控制音量大小的。好啦,該是時候來回答今天的小測驗了,Neil

  • Neil: I asked you: What's Cockney Rhyming Slang for money? Is it… a) bread, b) honey or c) dough?

    Neil:讓我問你:什麼是跟錢有關的考克尼押韻俚語?它是... a) 麵包 b) 蜂蜜 或是 c) 生麵團?

  • Alice And I said a) bread.

    Alice:我選 a) 麵包

  • Neil And you were right, Alice! Cockney Rhyming Slang uses just the first word of a phrase that rhymes with the word we're trying to disguise. So 'money' becomes 'bread and honey' but we just say 'bread'.

    Neil:你答對了,Alice!考克尼押韻俚語僅使用我們想要掩飾的字的押韻片語的第一個單字,所以「money」就變成了「bread 跟 honey」,但我們只說「bread」

  • Alice OK, so let's recap on the words we've learned today. They are:

    好了,Alice,讓我們來複習我們今天學到的單字吧。有:

  • slang, dosh, smacker, Cockney Rhyming Slang, colloquial,

    俚語「貨幣」、美元或英鎊,考克尼押韻俚語,口語的

  • frowned upon, lingered, booze, swear, profanity, jargon

    不被看重、留下了、酒精、罵髒話、 不敬的話、行話

  • Neil: Well, that's the end of today's 6 Minute English. Please join us again soon!

    Neil:好了,這就是今天的六分鐘英文的尾聲。快來加入我們吧

  • Both Bye!

    掰掰!

Hello and welcome to 6 Minute English. I'm Alice

哈囉,歡迎來到六分鐘英文。我是 Alice

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B2 中高級 中文 英國腔 俚語 押韻 語言 使用 海軍 麵包

BBC 六分鐘學英語三十六 (BBC Learning English_Slang_BBC 6 minutes English _2016)

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