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  • "We need to find a way forward to make sure that we can stop terrorists while protecting

  • privacy and liberty of innocent Americans."

  • "This is not about giving the state access to the content of people's e-mails or telephone

  • conversations. That requires a warrant and all the proper processes have to be gone through."

  • "The public shouldn't be worried about this. This is about insuring that police and security

  • services can continue to protect the public, continue to catch criminals, and stop terrorists."

  • "We have to find a way to give the President the power he needs to protect us while making

  • sure that he doesn't abuse that power."

  • "An awful lot of misinformation, frankly, has been put about about what's being proposed."

  • So the America and British public have been repeatedly reassured they have nothing to

  • be concerned about over increased surveillance measures. But a recent top secret leak from

  • the NSA has proven that the agency has a massive surveillance program called Boundless Informant.

  • The program analyzes all of the data collected by their intelligence gathering systems and

  • the leak showed that in March 2013 three billion pieces of intelligence were collected from

  • US computer networks and worldwide 97 billion pieces of intelligence were gathered. It's

  • pretty embarrassing for the NSA because they've repeatedly tried to reassure the American

  • public that they had no such capability but let's take a step back for a second. Just

  • who are the NSA? It stands for National Security Agency and they're in charge of collecting

  • cryptologic intelligence on foreign targets i.e. not American people. The American public

  • are protected by the Fourth Amendment which means that no wiretapping can take place without

  • the approval of US Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, the Attorney General of the United

  • States or the Director of the NSA and a whole bunch of other stipulations all there to protect

  • the public. But that didn't stop the Bush administration from expanding the NSA's powers

  • so they could monitor the web activity, including e-mails and telephone calls of US citizens

  • if one end of the communication was outside the US. That caused quite a bit of controversy

  • in the United States way back in 2007 and then in 2011 the controversy stepped up again

  • when James Bamford wrote an article for WIRED claiming that the NSA was involved in a massive

  • data mining operation in Utah. At that time, Chris Inglis the NSA's highest-ranking civilian

  • told reporters, "I can't tell you a lot about what they're going to be doing, because it's

  • highly classified." Congress couldn't ignore all of the noise and they started to ask questions

  • and the NSA kept batting those accusations out of the park.

  • "Does the NSA routinely intercept American citizens e-mails?"

  • "No."

  • "Does the NSA intercept Americans cellphone conversations?"

  • "No."

  • "Google searches?"

  • "No."

  • "Text messages?"

  • "No."

  • "Msn.com orders?"

  • "No."

  • "Bank records?"

  • "No."

  • But the latest leak shows just how far this NSA surveillance program has gone. We now

  • know that the NSA use BoundlessInformant to analyze all of their intelligence. A capability

  • they have repeatedly denied they actually have.

  • "Does the NSA collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of

  • records?"

  • "No sir."

  • "It does not?"

  • "Not wittingly."

  • Boundelessinformant analyzes significant amounts of data and a heat map in the leak showed

  • that Iran and Pakistan were heavily monitored but the program didn't stop there. PRISM is

  • the code name for their program to access data held by tech giants like Facebook, Google,

  • Microsoft, and Skype. Although those companies deny knowing the program exists at all.

  • This slide shows that when each of those services were added to the PRISM program and this slide

  • shows the kinds of data the NSA has access to. Things like your e-mail, your chats, including

  • video and voice chat, your videos, photos, stored data, Skype calls, file transfers,

  • and even your log-ins. The scale of this data access means that almost anybody in any country

  • could have their information accessed. In an interview with the Guardian's Glenn Greenwald

  • and Laura Poitras, the man behind the leak Edward Snowden revealed just how powerful

  • this data is.

  • "I sat at my desk certainly had the authority to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant

  • to a federal judge to even the President if I had a personal e-mail."

  • And so then came the back pedaling from the politicians who reassured the public that

  • there was nothing to worry about. General James Clapper who denied the existence of

  • these programs in Congress called the leaks reprehensible. President Obama said congressional

  • oversight would stop the NSA becoming Big Brother but since he said that it's been revealed

  • that congressional leaders were briefed on it just 13 times in four years so Congress

  • was hardly doing its job of overseeing the agency. Al Gore tweeted that it was obscenely

  • outrageous to have people secretly surveilled and others have said it has broken the United

  • States constitution. Over here the government has refused to confirm or deny whether the

  • UK's GCHQ has had access to information gathered using the NSA's PRISM system and foreign secretary

  • William Hague said that law-abiding citizens have no reason to worry.

  • The argument goes that if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to fear but is this

  • really how privacy works. When people close the curtains in their living rooms at night

  • they do not because they have something to hide but because they're entitled to some

  • privacy. Would you let people peer through your living room window without your knowledge

  • even if you didn't have anything to hide? And if that's the case shouldn't this be the

  • way that digital privacy works as well. Then there's another issue which is yet to be discussed

  • at great length. John Perkins the author of 'Confessions of an Economic Hitman' has highlighted

  • the potential for blackmail. If the NSA can dig up information on anyone it likes, it's

  • possible that dirt can be found on anyone, a presidential candidate, a supreme court

  • judge, academics. It's personal information on their sexuality or previous drug use that

  • they might want to keep private and that information can be used to blackmail people. With access

  • to this kind of data the NSA have the potential to hold a dagger over a huge number of people

  • so should any agency have access to this kind of information?

  • Daniel Elsberg who leaked the Pentagon papers 40 years ago has described Edward Snowden

  • as 'saving America'. He wrote that a digital police state infrastructure had been created

  • in the United States. Elsberg also says that this leak is the most important in the US's

  • history.

  • "The greatest fear that I have regarding the outcome for America of these disclosures is

  • that nothing will change."

  • It will be interesting to see what people in the United States say, it will be very

  • interesting to see how governments respond and as ever we're always interested to hear

  • what you guys think so let us know your thoughts about this story in a comment and if this

  • is the first time you've seen Truthloader hit subscribe and we'll see you guys again

  • next time.

"We need to find a way forward to make sure that we can stop terrorists while protecting

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舉報人愛德華-斯諾登披露的大規模NSA間諜計劃 - Truthloader(真相加載器) (Massive NSA spying program revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden - Truthloader)

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