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  • Good Morning John At the very first VidCon, I was being interviewed

  • by a television reporter who, at one point, was surprised by something I said, and she

  • said to me "You can make money on YouTube?

  • How does that work?

  • And I was a little tired.

  • And I was also, like, super high on VidCon.

  • Like I was so excited about online video and all the stuff that had come together

  • and so like I did—I did not censor myself well.

  • I said something to the effect ofUm, advertising.

  • My show has more viewers than yours does.”

  • Which I did not intend to be a sick burn!

  • It just came out!

  • Like that was the thing that was true.

  • But the answer to that question is complicated, and since I think about YouTube a lot, and

  • I think that we should all be more open about how all of these things work, let’s do it,

  • let’s talk about how YouTubers make their money.

  • Different kinds of content have to have different kinds of support.

  • Like this right here, very low budget.

  • This is just two guys.

  • We could probably subsist on what we calladsense and merch.”

  • Adsense works for every YouTuber, as long as youre not like philosophically opposed

  • to advertising.

  • You click a little box when you upload your video, YouTube will sell an ad against it,

  • and then it will split the revenue with you, you get 55%.

  • This is kind of wonderful.

  • It is not a common thing among social media sites, though they have started to share some revenue

  • YouTube started doing it way back in like 2007 and 2008.

  • It’s also part of why it’s such an appealing place to make stuff, and also part of why

  • it’s become harder to break in.

  • Because if there’s a way to make money, then people will spend money to make their

  • content look better so that they can compete on the platform.

  • Anyway, YouTube AdSense pretty much stays on the same level, and everybody has access

  • to that, which is really amazing.

  • But at higher levels, you start talking about brand deals, maybe endorsement deals, maybe

  • really good merch stuff.

  • And even eventually getting support from someone else to help realize your vision.

  • Crash Course and SciShow were both funded by grants from YouTube because they wanted

  • more high quality stuff on the site so advertisers would be more likely to advertise.

  • Those systems are really hard to democratize and make available to everybody.

  • Now brand deals are a little bit different.

  • They have started to be available to creators sort of in the middle class.

  • Brand deals, basically, anytime somebody pays you to talk about something in a video, whether

  • that’s like an audible.com callout at the end, or it can be a big elaborate production

  • and your entire video is about the topic that the brand wants you to talk about.

  • YouTube advertising is available to everybody, and it comes in and you don’t have to worry

  • about whether or not it’s gonna come in, but it’s a really low rate.

  • In order to supplement income, a lot of YouTubers, in addition to having, you know regular jobs,

  • also live in Los Angeles, where it’s easier to get gigs acting or hosting and TV commercials or shows.

  • And if you have more social media followers these days, it can be easier to get that kind

  • of work, which is interesting.

  • Some YouTubers also make money by touring, whether theyre comedians or musicians.

  • Sometimes creators will license their content to other platforms.

  • Sometimes videos go on TV and you make some money that way.

  • And then you have some creators like Rooster Teeth, building their own subscription platforms.

  • And then if you don’t want to make people subscribe, you can also ask them to subscribe

  • through services like Patreon, which is extremely important for shows like Sexplanations,

  • for example, that gets really bad YouTube ad rates because

  • advertisers don't want to be next to the word "sex."

  • Without the support of Patreon patrons, that show couldn’t happen at all.

  • The thing to remember is that different kinds of content work better with different kinds

  • of monetization.

  • Unlike what I said to that lady at VidCon 2010, it’s not simple.

  • It’s gotten a lot more difficult to make your way on this platform, and it has become

  • more complicated.

  • Which is one of the reasons why I recently started a thing called the Internet Creators Guild

  • with the goal of being a resource to connect creators together, to give them information,

  • and to let them have a unified voice when talking about when things go wrong, and what

  • they would like to make them happier.

  • To be clear, I started this thing, but I really don’t want to run it.

  • I don’t think that I should run it, and I definitely can’t.

  • Honestly, I think that I’m too biased to be in charge, so I’m looking forward to

  • eventually stepping back after helping Laura Chernikoff, who is one of the most effective

  • people I’ve ever met, get established as the executive director of the organization.

  • There is a lot of value that’s created by online video, and as different systems evolve

  • for capturing at least some of that value, it just gets more complicated.

  • And as those barriers rise, we need to create systems that keep the benefits of this revolution

  • accessible to the most people possible, and I hope that the Internet Creators Guild

  • can play a part in that.

  • Thanks, everybody, for listening to this.

  • Hopefully it wasn’t too inside baseball.

  • John, I’ll see you on Tuesday.

Good Morning John At the very first VidCon, I was being interviewed

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A2 初級

YouTubers如何賺錢? (How do YouTubers Make Money?)

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    哈維 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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