Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • - [Voiceover] What's up guys.

  • Welcome to TheArtClasses.com.

  • Today we are going to talk about

  • how I use a reference.

  • And the proper way to utilize the reference

  • that we use in the illustration.

  • There are a big difference between

  • using, copying from a photo and using a reference.

  • So a lot of time I'll get a question on the video,

  • did you use a reference?

  • But usually what it does mean is like

  • did you copy from a photo somewhere.

  • And reference use it's very important

  • in making a concept art or illustration.

  • And there are many ways to use reference

  • in your concept art and illustration.

  • When you look at something or analyze something.

  • So I will show you how I use a reference today,

  • just on a few of my, on a couple

  • of my illustration and concept art.

  • Alright, let's get started.

  • So here is a close up version

  • of the illustration of a book cover that I did

  • for some publication in Australia.

  • And in this one, I used a lot of reference

  • to get to, I'll show you the full one here.

  • So we're just going to close this one now.

  • And that is the full cover.

  • Basically.

  • And if you zoom in you see the size

  • of the book cover is probably going to be that,

  • about that big.

  • But, I usually paint about 2-3 times bigger.

  • And if you zoom in you see a bunch of

  • brush stroke, like here you see all this craziness in here.

  • Pretty chaotic, but you zoom out,

  • it will look clean and okay.

  • So first, I'm going to show you this one,

  • and how I get to this point.

  • So basically, you see a lot of my speed painting.

  • This is basically one of them.

  • And most of my speed paintings

  • are basically comps.

  • Where is it?

  • So I start off with here.

  • And it usually not that big,

  • so probably about that big.

  • So this is where I begin,

  • and the reference I use for these is

  • tons of

  • that one is basically the reference for lighting.

  • So there are many way to use the reference.

  • Like you could find one photo and

  • have using lighting as a reference,

  • so you notice even though it doesn't

  • look anything like this one,

  • but you notice the lighting,

  • they are basically the same.

  • So once I establish the lighting from there,

  • then I can thought of how I'm gonna compose my scene,

  • what do I put in there.

  • In the beginning I didn't think of it as much,

  • but then I was like ah maybe I should make them a

  • mech, commando, and then I was like

  • maybe I should keep them a group.

  • So a lot of time I will use lighting from other reference.

  • But usually, it depends on ya know how sometimes

  • I do the lighting style, sometimes I use the

  • reference for something else.

  • Sometime I just come up with the comps on something.

  • Here I add a few solider behind it,

  • really rough.

  • And I wanna see how the comp station turn out.

  • If it turn out that I

  • enjoy the comp scene and

  • the comp scene can be taken further

  • then I would go in and add a bunch

  • more detail in it.

  • But before you go in and add more detail,

  • you want to sketch out,

  • like okay what kind of detail you want for the arms,

  • or is it going to be mech,

  • or are they carrying a gun.

  • So I changed it totally to have him

  • being a sort of mech man as you can see,

  • like a bunch of armor

  • more of a futuristic, and then you see a tank

  • become a tank, and then...

  • You have to have a good understanding of light and shadow

  • to make this happen.

  • Because if you look at this here,

  • only this part, or you see the cut out

  • between light and shadow,

  • that is already going into the shadow zone

  • and when you pin an object into the shadow zone,

  • you have to consider the lighting,

  • okay the lighting coming from the

  • basically the sun come from the back.

  • So this guy gonna get a little bit more light,

  • and all the rest of this guy will just get

  • a touch of light because they are in the shadow zone.

  • And also with the face, I also using the reference

  • by looking at a bunch of hyenas,

  • even though it, I just kinda look at the mouth

  • and how it's gonna go.

  • And I give him a scar face.

  • If you Google hyena's your gonna see

  • tons of hyena's.

  • On the generic term I usually use Google, right.

  • So you can have wider range of option

  • because robot will gather this image for you.

  • And then I will do research on Pinterest

  • for some mech design.

  • So you can just take a look at some mech design

  • on Pinterest, which one would fit your type of mech,

  • because they're so many, there are like Steampunk,

  • futuristic, you want it to be a more rounded shape,

  • or you want it to be more angular.

  • Or you want it to be more Japanime.

  • It's entirely up to your direction

  • of how your gonna design it.

  • So once you gather a bunch of reference

  • you can put them into a,

  • where is it,

  • reference folder, so in here there's a...

  • I couldn't find a reference folder to use for this

  • but here is kinda something similar.

  • It's one of my student make them for his project.

  • Also you have to look at the real reference of,

  • like okay how is the wire how the gun would look

  • and all this part of the tank you can use,

  • all part of mixed with realism and

  • the concept, and the futuristic stuff

  • and you can apply into here,

  • like how and you have to also consider

  • if you're making creatures,

  • then you have to understand how

  • their body and anatomy work.

  • I don't want to just make a humanoid

  • and give him a human anatomy.

  • I want to make him maybe give it a hybrid look

  • so he will still kind of walking on his tippy toe

  • with a little hunch, like a gorilla kind of thing.

  • But he will still have to rely on his forefoot.

  • And walk around backward and be able to still

  • to carry stuff and I would imagine like how they

  • would like live, and sort of evolve

  • into a little bit more human-like with

  • like how when they walk.

  • So you kinda have to mix it with hybrid.

  • So that is the first one that's how I use the reference.

  • So there is a different between gathering a good

  • reference to use for your illustration and

  • just merely copy a photo and paint it.

  • I think a lot of time people misunderstand

  • reference, especially the beginners.

  • It's a good practice to sometimes if you want

  • to paint a photo just to practice your lighting

  • and your accuracy, then that's fine.

  • That's not all when you're gonna use a reference

  • that's not mere copy.

  • So in this illustration I use quite a bit of reference,

  • because I have to design the suit,

  • I have to maybe look at how to curly hair

  • actually work and as you see here,

  • there's a lot of brush stroke that's going in

  • to try to mimic the hair.

  • It's just a matter of preference.

  • Some people when they make illustration,

  • they like to clean line and clean stroke,

  • but I do love the texture of the brush,

  • and it's helped me achieving really some