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  • In this lesson I’m going to talk a little more about consonant intervals, which are thirds and sixths.

  • Weve already talked about how you can notate an interval.

  • Now what I want to do, is I want to add a little more information about this third.

  • So the way I’m going to do that is to count the half steps that are within that third.

  • I’m going to go to the keyboard, and I’m going to look at this third I created.

  • It was a C and an E. But now what I need to do is count.

  • There’s one half step, two, three, and four.

  • So there were four half steps in that third.

  • But let’s look at a different third and see how many half steps we get, like this one.

  • E, F, G, one, two, three, so it’s another third.

  • But this one, were going to count one half step, two, three.

  • So this one only has three half steps. Here’s four, and here’s three.

  • When you have four half steps, you want to say that your third is major.

  • Those are all four half steps, all major thirds. And then minor thirds.

  • They just sound a little bit different but theyre all

  • in the basic same category of consonant intervals and thirds.

  • So were going to look back up on the board now.

  • I’m going to add this information. I’m adding a capital M,

  • and that’s how I write major.

  • So in general, I’m going to use this abbreviation.

  • And when I write minor, it gets kind of confusing with of all the M’s,

  • so I would just write lowercase, and I put this line above it, like that.

  • That’s my abbreviation for minor, and that’s what I’ll do throughout.

  • Then the question is, what do you do if you want to notate one of these two different types of thirds?

  • So let’s try that. Again, it really helps to have

  • a picture of a piano keyboard in your mind.

  • So were going to try doingthis is my minor third, and I’m going to put up.

  • I want to write a minor third above that.

  • So now I’ve got two pieces of information to deal with.

  • I have the number, and then I have this quality right here.

  • So I just start with the number, that’s easier.

  • So I’m just going to count three, and I know it’s up,

  • so one, two, three, so I know it has to be some kind of a B.

  • I don’t know what the accidental is yet though.

  • Then what I want to do is imagine the keyboard in my mind or I can just play it.

  • I’m going to play three half steps up from that G on the piano.

  • So there’s my G, and this would just be a plain old B.

  • One half step, two half steps, so three half steps is actually right there.

  • When I go back to the board, I need to make sure I put a flat in front of this.

  • Now the question would be, we know a little about enharmonic equivalence, B flat is actually the same as A sharp.

  • The problem with this is, if I’m actually trying to write a minor third,

  • G, A, this is actually going to be some kind of a second.

  • So it’s actually not going to be what I want right here.

  • You do have to be careful not to change your letter names all around.

  • And well just do one more of those.

  • Let’s say that you do a bass clef, and you want to try a major third,

  • I’m going to start here with a B flat, and I want to do a major third down.

  • Here’s my B flat right here, and I go down one half step, one, two, three, four.

  • If I want a major third, I’m going to have to flat that G to get that major third.

  • You can think about both pieces of those information when you write your intervals.

  • Now weve talked about thirds, but consonant intervals also include sixths.

  • I’m going to show you a quicker way than counting intervals to get to your sixths.

  • Were going to start with this third, B up to D.

  • What I’m going to do to invert it is take one of those two pitches,

  • and I’m going to wrap it around the other one and change the octave.

  • It needs to cross over where the other note is.

  • Now I’m going to take this away.

  • What I did was I just inverted my third and it turned into something else.

  • I’m going to go back to that same one that I had originally, the same third.

  • I’m just going to invert it the other direction because now I’m going to keep this the same

  • and I’m going to move this one around.

  • I’m going to go like that, bring it up the octave,

  • and I’ll get rid of this one, and I have just inverted that third again.

  • So it was B to D before, and it’s really just those same notes,

  • theyre just in different places. So that’s inversion.

  • Let’s see why that’s important. If we do this, were going to get, in both cases, sixths.

  • Before, we had a minor third, B up to D, so let’s see what we end up getting with this sixth.

  • This one, we know it’s a sixth, so we had a minor third.

  • I’m going to show you what happens on the keyboard here.

  • I have a really easy way of figuring out if it’s a major or minor sixth.

  • What I do, is I go back to my third, and I was pretty sure this was a minor third,

  • but I want to make sure. One, two, three half steps.

  • Well, the sixth is a major sixth.

  • We know that without even needing to count.

  • So if we have major, it’s going to become minor.

  • Then there was something else that we can summarize up here too.

  • This of course is also the opposite way.

  • If we go down here and look at that number, we had a third and it turned into a sixth.

  • So major becomes minor, and minor becomes major

  • when you invert an interval, and the numbers add up to nine.

  • There’s still one more piece of information, that is the half steps.

  • Maybe the half steps add up to something too, and in fact they do.

  • So if you have four half steps in your major third, and then you invert it

  • twelve minus four is eight. So that other interval is going to have eight half steps.

  • If you have an interval with 6 half steps,

  • it’s going to invert and become an interval that also has 6 half steps.

  • Half steps always add up to twelve, the numbers add up to nine, and then these two are going to flip.

  • Going back to this major third, what happens if we have the same C to E,

  • those same two letter names, and we add a little bit of an expansion in there?

  • We could do that, for example, by sharping the E.

  • So when we do this, we now actually have more than four intervals.

  • What happens if it shrinks?

  • Here we have a minor third, what happens if we compress it even more?

  • I’ll compress it, I’m just going to choose to do this by sharping the C.

  • I’ve just shrunk it down, so now if this is three half steps,

  • what I have here is only two half steps, and that’s diminished.

  • There’s a little circle, and that’s your abbreviation for that.

  • Since you already know a little bit about inversion,

  • one more piece to add to that now that we have diminished and augmented here,

  • if you invert a diminished interval, youre going to get an augmented interval,

  • and well look at that on the piano.

  • Here’s my C to E, and we talk about augmenting that by

  • raising the E so it looks just like an F on the piano.

  • That’s you introduction to consonant intervals

In this lesson I’m going to talk a little more about consonant intervals, which are thirds and sixths.

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B1 中級

音樂101:輔音音程 (Music 101: Consonant Intervals)

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    songwen8778 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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