Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Today an increasing number of people who own pets are becoming familiar with the sight

  • of the veterinary nurse in their local practice.

  • Veterinary Nursing is a rewarding career that offers variety and daily contact with animals

  • and their owners.

  • As a qualified Veterinary Nurse you will be responsible for the welfare, comfort and

  • recovery of animals that may have undergone trauma, surgery or are receiving treatment for

  • medical conditions.

  • You will be trained to a high level to enable you to work in all aspects of the veterinary

  • practice from reception through to the operating theatre.

  • The majority of Veterinary Nurses work in small animal practice, which is a practice that

  • predominantly treats cats, dogs and small animals such as rabbits and rodents as well

  • as the occasional reptile.

  • Like their counterpart in the NHS, Veterinary Nurses must be prepared to work long and

  • often unsociable hours when the occasion demands. The work can be physically

  • demanding and Veterinary Nurses must be versatile enough to turn their hands to the

  • many aspects of veterinary practice like the reception work you see here.

  • The receptionist is the first contact the client has with the practice and must make a

  • favourable impression.

  • It’s important to be of smart appearance at all times as well as being cheerful, patient and

  • helpful.

  • Owners can often be in an emotional state when their pets are unwell. And the good

  • Veterinary Nurse must be able to deal with such situations sympathetically. Imagine how

  • you would feel if your own pet had been involved in a road traffic accident for example.

  • The Veterinary Nurse is admitting this patient for an operation, the procedure is discussed

  • with the owner and a consent form signed.

  • Another important role of the Veterinary Nurse is to assist the Veterinary Surgeon in surgery.

  • Here we see two nurses assisting with an operation one is monitoring the level of

  • anaesthetic that is being administered to the patient while the other is scrubbed in and

  • assisting the surgeon as an extra pair of hands.

  • Some operations do not require this type of assistance from the nurse, but in the majority

  • of instances the maintenance of anaesthesia by the nurse is essential and is obviously an

  • extremely responsible job.

  • This area is called the prep room and many of the simple, non-surgical operations are

  • performed here. This cat is having his teeth de-scaled by a Veterinary Nurse, he was first

  • of all anaesthetised by a Vet who also examined his mouth and removed any bad

  • teeth. The Veterinary Nurse continues the procedure by removing the plaque from the

  • remaining teeth whilst one of her colleagues continues to monitor the cat’s anaesthetic.

  • This rabbit has been sedated in order for the Vet to burr its teeth. The Veterinary Nurse is

  • assisting by holding the animal and monitoring its heart rate and breathing.

  • This nurse is assisting the vet in administering chemotherapy to a patient.

  • It’s often necessary to take x-rays, more properly called radiographs, of animals in

  • order to diagnose problems such as broken bones. Most practices have their own x-ray

  • machine, and the Veterinary Nurse is usually responsible for positioning the animal and

  • taking the x-ray. In this, as in all aspects of the job, proper training is essential, not only

  • for good standards of work, but also to comply with health & safety regulations.

  • After undergoing an operation the patient is moved to a recovery area where the nurse will

  • be responsible for monitoring its progress. Nursing of patients is considered by many

  • nurses to be the most rewarding aspect of the job.

  • Most Veterinary Surgeons dispense the necessary drugs for the animals in their care

  • rather than only giving the owner a prescription. This means keeping and

  • managing a large stock of medicines and tablets. The dispensing and ordering of these

  • is often the initial responsibility of the Veterinary Nurse who then reports back to the

  • surgeon.

  • Many practices have computerised ordering systems as well as a computer which stores

  • client records.

  • In addition, the Veterinary Nurse may have to carry out certain laboratory tests.

  • Some Veterinary Nurses choose to train and work for one of the welfare organisations. The

  • role of the nurse here is similar to that in small animal practice except that the animals

  • they care for may not have an owner or the owner may not be able to afford private

  • veterinary medicine. Working in this field may sometimes require great mental fortitude as

  • animals are sometimes presented in a very poor state physically and in some cases

  • euthanasia is the only option. However, the rewards when a patient is successfully treated

  • by the Veterinary Surgeon and nursed back to health by the nurse to be returned to a

  • grateful owner are tremendous.

  • There are occasionally opportunities for the Veterinary Nurse to work in an equine

  • practice, although this type of practice is much less common than the small animal

  • practice which weve just seen.

  • The duties of this nurse in this field may include stable management and assisting with

  • radiography and surgery. Experience with horses is an obvious advantage.

  • Opportunities in large animal practice, which is working with farm animals, are very limited.

  • Most of these practices are known as mixed practices, in other words, they provide a

  • service for both pet owners and farmers.

  • The Veterinary Nurse in these practices will deal with the farmers when they phone up or

  • come in for drugs and will occasionally be required to assist with procedures on a farm

  • animal; these are most commonly performed on the farm.

  • So what about training? The entry requirements are a minimum of 5 GCSE’s at

  • Grade C or above which must include English language, science and mathematics.

  • Alternative qualifications of a comparable or higher standard may be accepted and these

  • would be checked on initial enrolment.

  • There are two different routes to qualifying as a Veterinary Nurse. The Level 3 Diploma in

  • Veterinary Nursing comprises a core and two option pathways, one in small animal nursing

  • and one in equine nursing. Training can be undertaken via an apprenticeship, which

  • means you work as a student VN in practice and attend college part time, or by joining a

  • full time course at college and undertaking clinical placements in veterinary practice.

  • You must complete at least 60 full-time weeks of work experience in veterinary practice

  • alongside completing work based clinical skills using a Nursing Progress Log (NPL).

  • Alternatively, you can undertake a Veterinary Nursing Foundation or BSc Honours Degree

  • at University. Training takes between three and four years depending upon the type of

  • course you choose.

  • You will also undertake a number of different examinations and assessment which will

  • include written and practical examinations, college examinations, assignments and work

  • based assessments.

  • Once qualified, nurses are placed on the register kept by the Royal College of

  • Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS), they are entitled to use the initials RVN (Registered Veterinary

  • Nurse) after their name and can perform all the procedures described in schedule 3 of the

  • Veterinary Surgeons act.

  • After qualification, Veterinary Nurses will find a rewarding career ahead of them. Nurses

  • may choose to develop an interest in different aspects of animal health, such as behaviour,

  • alternative therapy or may choose to further develop their skills by studying the Diploma in

  • Advanced Veterinary Nursing focussing on areas such as anaesthesia, radiography or

  • intensive care nursing.

  • Veterinary Nurses may choose to embark on a career in nursing and work in large veterinary

  • hospitals, universities or specialist referral centres. They may also take on a veterinary

  • practice management role or become a veterinary drugs company representative.

  • Many RVN’s may also elect to follow a career in education and become college tutors and

  • lecturers thus teaching the next generation of veterinary nurses.

  • Many Veterinary Nurses are members of the British Veterinary Nursing Association (BVNA)

  • The BVNA was formed in 1965 and is the only

  • representative body for veterinary nurses in the UK.

  • BVNA’s main objective is to promote animal health and welfare through the on-going

  • development of professional excellence in veterinary nursing.

  • Membership is open to all veterinary nurses, trainees and interested persons.

  • The staff at the head office in Harlow will be only too pleased to help you with any

  • enquiries that you may have.

Today an increasing number of people who own pets are becoming familiar with the sight

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B2 中高級 英國腔

獸醫護理職業 (A Career in Veterinary Nursing)

  • 200 28
    chuantc.cheng 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字