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  • Kit's dead.

  • He, he died.

  • Kit, do you wanna go for a walk?

  • Sorry, that was mean.

  • I'll take you for a walk after this, go back to sleep!

  • Now I feel bad.

  • Hey guys how's it going? My name is Micaela, and today I wanted to make a video addressing

  • a question that was asked in my last video.

  • The last video I did was about why I wasn't choosing to naturalise, or become a Japanese

  • Citizen, and it sparked a lot of really really interesting responses, interesting as in "good",

  • and interesting as in "hurtful and hateful", but overall very interesting, so thank you

  • very much for all of your feedback. It has been a ride.

  • If I don't plan to turn into a Japanese Citizen, then why am I even living in Japan?

  • This answer has several layers, and I'd kinda like to go through them right now.

  • The first layer is the stereotypical TV answer that every foreigner gives when they're interviewed

  • for a TV program:

  • I like Japan because it's a beautiful country, I love the language, the food is delicious,

  • I love nature, it's a very clean country, everyone is very polite, and there are some

  • really brilliant inventions like onigiri wrappers that open like this~! Or sushi trains with

  • automatic touch panels!

  • Japan is a fairly-well functioning country in terms of disease control, low crime rates,

  • cost of living, and people are generally polite on a day-to-day basis, because part of Japanese

  • culture is "preserving the harmony". While on the internet you may read a bunch of really

  • really hateful comments, that's not the way that people are in real life so don't let

  • it scare you away.

  • So that's like, the vanilla TV answer™, but there are actually more dimensions than

  • that.

  • I like Japan, don't get me wrong, I do like Japan and that is where I live right now,

  • but the truth is I also like other countries in Asia too.

  • And luckily because I'm in Fukuoka, Fukuoka Airport has direct flights to neighboring

  • Asian countries, and so it's so so easy to go from Fukuoka to Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore,

  • Thailand, to yes, Korea, and China.

  • Living in Canada, the country next door is America, and I've crossed the border many

  • times and it's like, you don't even really see what the difference is, to be honest,

  • it's, there's nothing that different.. Besides the money.

  • However, being in Japan and say flying an hour to Korea, it's completely different!

  • It's completely different, and it can be a little bit scary and intimidating, but it's

  • also thrilling. It's like, I love that thrill, that adrenaline rush you get from being somewhere

  • where you don't understand anything but you kinda just have to breathe, focus, and figure

  • it out.

  • And living in Fukuoka allows me to do that, I can just go to all these places but at the

  • end of the day, I can come back to Japan where I do feel a little more comfortable. And that's

  • nice!

  • So the third layer, the third layer is actually the most personal..

  • Canada, is a great country in many ways, but like I said, every country has it's flaws,

  • and for me there is just one outstanding flaw that I couldn't agree with, and um, that's

  • ultimately what drove me to want to visit somewhere new.

  • I'm going to sound super uncool and like, grandma-like trying to explain this, I'm explaining

  • it in simple terms because I know that Japanese people watch this video too...

  • I went to high school in a small town, I was born in Vancouver, in Richmond but I grew

  • up in a smaller town away from Vancouver, and um, going to highschool there's not a

  • lot to do and people like to fill their time experimenting with drugs and alcohol, for

  • me that was something that was really really hard because had decided when I was a child?

  • when I was young? I would never do drugs or drink alcohol, because I dunno, I just, it

  • was something that just felt right.

  • I had friends, I had great friends, I love my friends so much, but um, you know going

  • to parties, and stuff, at first I would go anyway, but because I wasn't partaking in

  • any of the activities, it just became really hard to relate to everyone cause like, while

  • they were going on this little journey together, I was kind of like, stepping back and being

  • like "okay this isn't what I want for myself", so I kind of isolated myself on purpose, cause

  • it just wasn't for me.

  • And coming to Japan changed my life, it felt right, and the reason it felt right was because

  • I was suddenly put into a school that was very strict, we had school, 6? no five and

  • a half days a week. Monday to Friday, and then half a day on Saturday.

  • After school everyone went to club activities, they were playing sports, they were healthy,

  • they were engaged, and they were like, motivated?

  • It was completely different from my school experience back in Canada. And I felt like

  • that made more sense to me. And for me, growing up in that environment, like I felt like,

  • the discipline made me a better person. And I felt better about myself, and the type of

  • person I was becoming.

  • And even growing up in Japan, so like from, what? 18, 19, 20, it was really nice that,

  • you know, when people hang out, they go to Karaoke, they go to the game centre, they

  • take purikura, they eat cake at a cute little cafe and they talk, and they go shopping...

  • We love starbucks and sakura lattes, and like that is our excitement for the day, that's

  • what fulfills us.

  • I felt like that lifestyle suited me, and the kind of person that I wanted to be, and

  • the kind of lifestyle I wanted to have, a lot better than what I was getting living

  • in a small town in Canada.

  • And if you're going through a hard time I just want you to know, that you can use that

  • energy, you can focus it into building yourself into the person that you wanna be.

  • Once you're in a place that feels right, like, everything changes.

  • Now that I'm older, I go back to Canada and I visit my friends, cause I do love my friends,

  • I visit them and a lot of them have grown out of that, I love going back and I love

  • seeing them and hanging out with them NOW, I just think that it was really hard growing

  • up like that, and for me, if I had grown up like that I don't know if I would have been

  • happy with who I was, so, I'm really glad that I took this opportunity, I am thankful

  • to Japan. Like, I'm thankful, to Japan for raising me, but why am I still in Japan? Even

  • if I don't want to renounce my Canadian citizenship? It's because I'm comfortable here! I feel

  • comfortable here, and I'm happy here, and I just like, I can live here without becoming

  • a Japanese citizen, legally, that's fine, it's not an issue, it doesn't mean I don't

  • like Japan. I'm very thankful for Japan, but...

  • Yeah.

  • I gotta go. Bye,

Kit's dead.

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A2 初級 美國腔

那你是在日本嗎? (SO THEN Y R U IN JAPAN THEN?)

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    むなかた じゅん 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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