Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • In this American English pronunciation video,

  • we're going to go over

  • linking consonant to consonant.

  • Linking is an important part

  • of American English.

  • If we break between each word,

  • it sounds very choppy.

  • But in American English,

  • we like to link words together

  • for a smooth sound.

  • I've already made videos on linking

  • Vowel to Vowel and Consonant to Vowel.

  • Linking Consonant to Consonant

  • happens all the time in American English.

  • In that sentence right there

  • it happened four times:

  • ng-kk, nt-tt, nt-hh, and ll-th.

  • We can’t cover every example

  • of linking consonant to consonant

  • as there are simply too many combinations

  • for this video,

  • but I will give you some examples.

  • First let's talk about

  • linking the same consonant.

  • Take the example 'gas station'.

  • It's not 'gas station',

  • with two separate S's, it's 'gas station':

  • one S, connecting the two words.

  • I'm going to the gas station.

  • I already used this example

  • last year when I took a road trip.

  • Click here to see that video,

  • or go to the video description.

  • Another example: some might, some might.

  • Again, not some might, but some might,

  • connected with one M. Some might think so.

  • The rule gets a little complicated

  • when we bring in Stop Consonants.

  • The six stop consonants are

  • t, d, p, b, k, and g.

  • When these meet in between two words,

  • like 'hot today',

  • you have to stop the air

  • to signify the first consonant,

  • then release the sound into the next word.

  • So, it's not 'hahtoday',

  • but 'hot today', with a stop.

  • So to make that stop,

  • I'm just holding the air in my throat,

  • for a fraction of a second.

  • Another example, 'bad dog'.

  • It's not 'baadog', but bad dog, with a stop.

  • This is true in general when we're linking

  • a stop consonant to any other consonant.

  • For example, peanut butter

  • stopped T, released B, peanut butter.

  • Not 'peanuh butter', with no stop,

  • but also not 'peanut butter'

  • with a released T, but peanut butter.

  • Flip phone.

  • Here we stop the sound

  • with the lips in position for the P,

  • then go straight into the F consonant

  • without releasing the P.

  • Flip phone, flip phone.

  • It's not 'flip phone', with a full release,

  • and it's not flihphone, with no stop of air.

  • We have to stop the air.

  • Flip phone, flip phone.

  • This way of linking ending stop consonants

  • to words that begin with another consonant

  • is a great trick to add to your English

  • if you haven’t already.

  • Some students have trouble with this,

  • and add an additional schwa sound between

  • words in order to link in these situations.

  • So 'hot sauce' becomes something more like

  • 'hot-uh-sauce'.

  • So remember,

  • don't release that ending stop consonant,

  • just stop the air.

  • For all other cases,

  • you'll just need to isolate

  • the two sounds in question and practice.

  • Let's take for example 'It's a tough one'.

  • Here we're linking the F and W sounds.

  • Practice them separately, ff, ww, ff, ww.

  • Now practice them together,

  • sliding slowly from one sound to the other

  • ff-ww, ff-ww.

  • Really think about what you're moving

  • to transition in-between these two sounds.

  • In this case, my bottom lip was touching

  • the bottom of the top front teeth, ff,

  • and then the lips round out.

  • My tongue doesn't have to move.

  • Ff-ww, ff-ww,

  • tough one, tough one.

  • Tough one. It's a tough one.

  • So, isolate the sounds,

  • practice them separately,

  • practice them together slowly, speed them up

  • and put them back

  • into the context of the words

  • and eventually the sentence.

  • Let's look at one more example.

  • We'll link the N sound to the R sound:

  • On Rachel's desk.

  • Here, my lips and tongue have to move.

  • Nn, rr, nn, rr.

  • Now link them together slowly:

  • nn, rr.

  • You may see my lips are rounding

  • a little bit as I'm making the N,

  • that's in preparation for the R.

  • The tongue goes from having the top part

  • of the front of the tongue

  • at the roof of the mouth here, NN, to having

  • the front part of the tongue touching nothing.

  • As the tongue pulls back for the R

  • So for the R, the middle part of the tongue

  • is touching the roof of the mouth, or maybe

  • the insides of the teeth, about here.

  • Nn-rr. Onn-Rr, Onn-Rrachel's.

  • I'm really feeling the tongue move up

  • and then back,

  • on Rachel's, on Rachel's.

  • On Rachel's desk.

  • Check out the other videos that I've made,

  • that address some

  • consonant to consonant linking.

  • Take any short text and look for words

  • that should link consonant to consonant.

  • For each case,

  • think about what kind of linking it is.

  • Is the consonant the same?

  • Is the first consonant a stop consonant?

  • Practice it slowly.

  • Linking is a crucial part of smoothing out speech,

  • sounding American.

  • Put an example of a simple sentence

  • where you would need to link

  • consonant to consonant below in the comments.

  • Practice with the sentences

  • that everyone else puts!

  • That's it, and thanks so much for using

  • Rachel's English.

In this American English pronunciation video,

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級

輔音與輔音之間的聯繫 -- 美式英語的發音 (Linking Consonant to Consonant -- American English Pronunciation)

  • 211 55
    Hangrui Liu 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字